Sign Me Up!

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Career Development

    Course : Career Portals: Middle School

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (4) The student explores the professional skills needed for college and career success. The student is expected to:
      • (B) explore the importance of curricular, extracurricular, career preparation, and extended learning experiences
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • discuss various curricular and extracurricular activities
    • examine career preparation provided through curricular and extracurricular activities
    • compare and contrast extended learning experiences
    • explore Career and Technical Student Organizations – FCCLA, TAFE and SkillsUSA
  • Rationale

    Script:

    How many of you belong to a school related curricular or extra-curricular club or organization? What types of activities do you participate in those clubs? Actively participating in these types of organizations and activities help you learn many skills that employers are looking for. These are called transferable skills. Aside from being fun or competitive, curricular and extra-curricular activities are also useful in preparing you for the “real world!”

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Apprenticeship: One bound by indenture to serve another for a prescribed period with a view to learning an art or trade

    Curricular: Activities that are connected to the regular curriculum or program of courses and may carry academic credit

    CTSO: Acronym for Career and Technology Student Organization. Examples of CTSO’s include FCCLA, SkillsUSA and TAFE

    Externship: A training program that is part of a course of study of an educational institution and is taken in private business

    Extra-curricular: Outside the regular curriculum or program of courses and usually carrying no academic credit

    Internship: Any official or formal program to provide practical experience for beginners in an occupation or profession

    Organization: An administrative and functional structure

    Practicum: A course of study designed especially for the preparation of teachers and clinicians that involves the supervised practical application of previously studied theory

    Professional Association: A body of persons engaged in the same profession, formed usually to control entry into the profession, maintain standards, and represent the profession in discussions with other bodies

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for multimedia presentation
    • computer lab with Internet access
    • presenter/remote

    Materials:

    • High school curricular and extra-curricular flyers and brochures
    • Middle school curricular and extra-curricular flyers and brochures

    • copies of handouts ( see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    Before class begins:

    Gather promotional materials for extra-curricular activities available at your campus as well as materials for extra- curricular activities offered at your local high schools including Career and Tecnical Student Organizations (CTSOs) FCCLA, SkillsUSA and TAFE.
    Skills USA brochures can be printed from http://www.skillsusa.org/downloads/PDF/BrochureA.pdf,
    Additional SkillsUSA downloads are available at http://www.skillsusa.org/educators/downloads.shtml
    Post brochure and posters around the classroom for each organization. Arrange desks into four groups and place brochures, pamphlets, pens and other materials in each group so that there is a FCCLA group, SkillsUSA group and TAFE group.

    __

    As class begins, tell the students to pick one group and begin to look over the materials and posters provided. Allow students to rotate groups every 10 minutes.

    Ask the following questions:

    • What extra-curricular activities are offered at our school/in our community?
    • How can students find out about extra-curricular activities?
    • How many of you participate in an extra-curricular activity?
    • Who would like to share why or what they get out of being a part of that group/team?
    • Why do people join organizations?
    • Do adults participate in extra-curricular activities? Why/Why not?


    If time permits, allow students to personalize their CTSOs Word Cloud (see all Lessons Attachments tab) and place in their class folder/binder as a cover sheet for any other documents related to this lesson this lesson.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Distribute graphic organizer, KWL Chart – CTSOs, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first two columns of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about CTSOs and what the want to know about CTSOs. The last column will be completed during lesson closure.

    Distribute handouts, Notetaking – Curricular and Extra-Curricular (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Instruct to take notes while viewing the slide presentation. Introduce PowerPoint™, Sign Me Up! (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Thoroughly discuss the contents of each slide. Allow for student questions, comments and concerns.

    Teacher Note:
    Depending on which career cluster you are focusing on, or whether you exploring Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services, Note-taking CTSOs and individual slide presentations for FCCLA, SkillsUSA and TAFE (see All Lesson Attachments Tab) have been included for your use.

    Dstribute handout, Notetaking – CTSOs, and introduce PowerPoint(s)™, FCCLA, SkillsUSA and TAFE (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Discuss slides in detail. Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Before class begins:
    Cut apart Student Profiles cards (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Addition blank cards have been included in case you have a large class and need to add additional student profiles.

    Divide class into subgroups and distribute one Student Profile card per team. Have team of students discuss contents of card and determine what curricular, extra-curricular or CTSO would meet the need of the profiled individual. More that one answer may be correct. After completing task, have teams share their card and findings with the class. Teams must be able to defend their decisions.

    —-

    Option: Assign student to prepare and deliver a 90 second speech related to lesson. See 90 minute Speech Topics section below and 90 Second Speech Planner (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Presentation of speeches can be given during Lesson Closure.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment

  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce Self-Reflection – CTSOs (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that they will each be responsible for completing an individual reflection regarding their knowledge of extra-curricular activities, including the benefits of joining a CTSO, skills acquired through the organization, building a social network, engaging in new experiences and opportunities to compete.

    Students will work independently completing their self-reflection. Review assignment rubric so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • Lesson Closure

    Review objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Complete graphic organizers, KWL Chart – Curricular and Extra-curricular Activities (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and KWL Chart – CTSOs (see All Lesson Attachments tab) to analyze what they have learned about CTSOs.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student self-reflections will be assessed with appropriate rubric.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement

  • References/Resources

    Websites:

    • Family and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
      This website gives information to advisors and students on how to start a new chapter, meeting dates, and competition rules and procedures.
      http://www.texasfccla.org
    • SkillsUSA
      This website gives information to advisors and students on how to start a new chapter, meeting dates, and competition rules and procedures.
      http://www.skillsusa.org
    • Texas Association of Future Educators
      This website gives information to advisors and students on how to start a new chapter, meeting dates, and competition rules and procedures.
      http://www.tafeonline.org
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

  • College and Career Readiness Connection

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Have students take a field trip to the high school(s) in your district. Before your visit, ask the FCCLA, TAFE and SkillsUSA organizations to meet with the students. If possible, have the groups showcase their organizations through displays, brochures, multimedia and examples of projects.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Invite members of state officer teams for FCCLA, TAFE and SkillsUSA to speak to your class about the importance of student organizations, its benefits and what their organization specifically has to offer.

  • CTSO connection

    Distributive Education Club of America (DECA)
    http://texasdeca.org

    DECA Events:

    • Community Service Project
      The Community Service Project is a chapter project that provides an opportunity for chapter members to develop a better understanding of the role civic activities have in society, to make a contribution to a community service or charity, and to learn and apply the principles of the numerous components of marketing management.
    • Public Relations Project
      The purpose of the Public Relations Project is to provide an opportunity for the chapter members to demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed in planning, organizing, implementing and evaluating a single public relations campaign conducted by the chapter.

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:

    • Chapter Service Project Display
      Chapter Service Project is an individual or team event that recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools, communities and/or family and consumer sciences.
    • Chapter Service Project Manual
      Chapter Service Project Manual is an individual or team event that recognizes chapters that develop and implement an in-depth service project that makes a worthwhile contribution to families, schools,
      communities and/or family and consumer sciences.
    • Chapter Showcase Display
      Chapter Showcase Event is an individual or team event that recognizes chapters that develop and
      implement a well-balanced program of work and promote FCCLA and family and consumer sciences
      and/or related occupational skills to the community.
    • Chapter Showcase Manual
      Chapter Showcase Event is an individual or team event that recognizes chapters that develop and
      implement a well-balanced program of work and promote FCCLA and Family and Consumer Sciences
      and/or related occupational skills to the community.
    • Promote and Publicize FCCLA!
      This event allows students to do exactly what the title states – to promote and publicize FCCLA.

    Skills USA
    http://skillsusa.org

    SkillsUSA Events:

    • Chapter Display
      This event display is built around and articulates a common theme established annually by SkillsUSA.
    • Outstanding Chapter
      The Outstanding Chapter consists of activities members have been involved with during the school year.

    Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE)
    http://tafeonline.org

    TAFE Events:

    • Chapter Yearbook
      This event allows the organization to showcase their group over the course of the school year.
    • Promotional Video/Public Service Announcement (PSA)
      This event allows the student to showcase their talents using technology while promoting TAFE and the teaching profession.
    • Project Visualize
      This event allows students to highlight chapter projects.
    • TAFE Moment
      Students prepare a speech about a TAFE experience that has been a convincing factor in their
      decisions to become educators.
  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.nylc.org/

    Possible idea: Arrange students to host a CTSO fair in which the area high schools showcase their organizations in the areas of Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services.