The Adventure Starts Here! College and Career Readiness

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  • Lesson Identification and TEKS Addressed

    Cluster : Career Development

    Course : Career Portals: Middle School

  • TEKS Student Expectations

    • (4) The student explores the professional skills needed for college and career success. The student is expected to:
      • (A) articulate the importance of strong academic skills to meet personal academic and career goals
  • Basic Direct Teach Lesson

    Instructional Objectives

    Students will:

    • investigate academic skills needed for academic success
    • explain the importance of having strong academic skills
  • Rationale

    Script:

    Do you know what you want to do after high school? Do you know what preparation you will need to accomplish in middle and high school to get ready for your future?

    In this lesson we will explore various ways you can prepare for your future now!

  • Duration of Lesson

    Three 45 minute class periods

  • Word Wall

    Advanced placement courses (AP): High school courses taught on the level of a college course

    Class ranking: A mathematical summary of a student’s academic record as compared with other students in the class

    College preparatory: High school courses in primary subjects (language arts, math, science, social studies) that are required for college admission or are designed to help students prepare for college. In some high schools, the only college preparatory courses are those that are also considered honors or advanced placement

    Extracurricular activities: Voluntary activities in which students participate, normally after school or during weekend hours. These include athletics, performing arts, community service, student clubs

    Grade point average (GPA): A cumulative, numerical equivalent of your letter grades. In the most common system, A=4, B=3, C=3, D=1, and F=0

    Grants: Money to help pay for college costs, awarded to you by colleges; federal, state, and local governments; and private sources; that you do not have to pay back and is awarded based on financial need

    Letter of recommendation: A letter recommending you for a position, written by someone who has knowledge of your skills and competencies and has an advisory or supervisory role

    Scholarships: Money to help pay for college costs, awarded to you by colleges; federal, state, and local governments; and private sources; that you do not have to pay back. Scholarships are awarded based on merit (such as outstanding academic achievement, demonstrated talent, or athletic ability) or involvement (such as membership in an organization or ethnic group, or employment in a company)

    Transferable skills: Skills that are important in order to succeed in any workplace but that are not specific to any particular job. Instead, these skills can be transferred from one job to another

    Transcript: A written record of your achievement in high school, including the courses you have taken, the grades you have earned, certain standardized test scores, awards or special achievements, and your attendance record

  • Materials/Specialized Equipment Needed

    Equipment:

    • computer with projector for PowerPoint™ presentation
    • presenter/remote
    • copies of handouts (see All Lesson Attachments tab)
  • Anticipatory Set

    The day before this lesson:

    Distribute handout Scavenger Hunt (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and assign for homework. Discuss instructions for activity.

    Before class begins. Arrange desks/chairs into a large conversation circle. —- Begin class by allowing students time to share and discuss their experience interacting with adults and acquiring signatures.

    Ask the following questions:

    • Was anyone surprised by any responses? Why?
    • What information surprised you the most? Why?
    • Share responses with classmates.


    If time permits, allow students to personalize their Adventure Word Cloud (see all Lessons Attachments tab) and place in their class folder/binder as a cover sheet for any other documents related to this lesson this lesson.

  • Direct Instruction with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Introduce objectives, terms, and definitions.
    Distribute graphic organizer, KWHL Chart, (see All Lesson Attachments tab) and have students fill out the first three columns of the chart. Ask students to write down what they already know about career preparation, such as taking similar courses and joining CTSOs. The last column will be completed during lesson closure.
    Distribute handout, Notetaking, and introduce PowerPoint™, The Adventure Starts Here! – How Will You Prepare? (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Students will be expected to take notes while viewing the slide presentation.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing assistance with note-taking
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback

  • Guided Practice with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Distribute handout, Career Research Assignment (see All Lesson Attachments tab). Inform students that assignment may be prepared individually or with a partner. Explain that information will be expected to be retrieved only from reliable sources. Provide due date within 1 class period.

    Students must present summative information in an oral presentation. Analyze rubrics for each oral presentation (see All Lesson Attachments tab) option so that students are aware of assessment procedures.

    Assist students with research and career presentation choice. Allow students to select one topic from the handout, Career Research Assignment, list so that most or all topics are covered. Keep students focused and on task.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
  • Independent Practice/Laboratory Experience with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Students will work independently or with a partner researching and collecting data for their assignment. Students will complete their assignments and begin presentations.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • check for understanding
    • providing extra time for oral response
    • frequent feedback
    • providing peer tutoring
    • reducing length of assignment
    • assisting student in gathering information
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • Lesson Closure

    Review lesson objectives, terms, and definitions.

    Complete graphic organizer, KWHL Chart, to analyze what they have learned about career preparation.

  • Summative/End of Lesson Assessment with Special Education Modifications/Accommodations

    Student oral presentations will be assessed with appropriate Rubric provided during Guided Practice.

    Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for all special education students must be followed. Examples of accommodations may include, but are not limited to:

    • grading according to work done
    • providing praise and encouragement
  • References/Resources

    Websites:

    • Middle Schoolers: Get Ready!
      Strategies for middle school students to prepare for college.
      http://knowhow2go.org/
  • Additional Required Components

    English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) Strategies

    • word wall
    • draw visual representations of terms on word wall
  • College and Career Readiness Connection

    AchieveTexas Career Cluster Crosswalks

    The Career Cluster Crosswalks housed on the AchieveTexas website http://www.achievetexas.org/index.html provide Texas teachers with a direct connection between their CTE course TEKS and the College and Career Readiness Standards (CCRS). Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, and Cross-Disciplinary integration are the focus of the CCRS. These college and career readiness standards are essential in the planning and delivery of CTE lessons. The extent to which the integration occurs is determined by the methods and strategies utilized by each teacher.

    Career Cluster Crosswalks for Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism, and Human Services Career Clusters can be found at:
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Career%20Cluster%20Crosswalks.htm

  • Other Essential Lesson Components

    Enrichment activity

    Design a flyer that explains why academic skills are important to middle school students. Ask your principal if you can hang the fliers in the hallways at school.

  • Family/Community Connection

    Have students talk to their family members about their educational goals while they were in middle and high school and how they related to college. Students should be able to compare and contrast their goals with their families’ goals. Also, have students ask their parents what goals they may have for the student.

  • CTSO connection

    Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
    http://texasfccla.org

    STAR Events:
    • Career Investigation
    • Job Interview

  • Service Learning Projects

    Successful service learning project ideas originate from student concerns and needs. Allow students to brainstorm about service projects pertaining to lesson. For additional information on service learning see http://www.servicelearningtexas.org

    Possible idea:
    Organize a college and career readiness workshop. Include information on skills needed for academic and personal success for career goals. Include the middle and high school counselors for a Q & A session.