Travel and Tourism Management Online Course

  • Travel and Tourism Management Online Course Introduction

    travel2

    This course incorporates management principles and procedures of the travel and tourism industry as well as destination geography, airlines, international travel, cruising, travel by rail, lodging, recreation, amusements, attractions, and resorts. Employment qualifications and opportunities are also included in this course. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Travel and Tourism Management is one of 9 courses in the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Articulated Credit
    This course is also available for the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (1 credit) that gives high school students a chance to receive credit at participating community colleges across Texas for taking certain enhanced technical courses during high school.

    For more information, visit:

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and nine modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with six multiple choice or True/False statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.
    —-
    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Travel and Tourism Management for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-travel-and-tourism-management/

  • I. Principles of Time Management

    Wall Clocks with Various Times

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing.

    • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
    • (B) analyze various steps in the decision-making process
    • (C) discuss the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities

    Module Content

    Principles of Time Management is the first unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Time management
    • B. Decision making


    Refer to The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Travel and Tourism for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-balancing-act-managing-a-career-and-family-travel-and-tourism/

    Module I Handouts

    A. Time Management

    Time management is the act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity.

    Time management refers to a range of:

    • skills
    • tools
    • techniques

    These are used to manage time when accomplishing:

    • specific tasks
    • projects
    • goals

    This set encompasses a wide scope of activities that include:

    • planning
    • allocating
    • setting goals
    • delegation
    • analysis of time spent
    • monitoring
    • organizing
    • scheduling
    • prioritizing

    Initially, time management referred to just business or work activities, but now includes personal activities as well.

    Examples of how to use time management effectively are:

    • delegating tasks to the appropriate people
    • keeping accurate records and lists
    • preparing agendas before meetings
    • focusing on what items deserve top priority

    B. Decision making

    Decision making and problem solving are ongoing processes of:

    • evaluating situations or problems
    • considering alternatives
    • making choices
    • following up with necessary actions

    Introduce your students to The FCCLA Planning Process for Individual and Team Action.
    This is a decision-making tool that supports the organization’s overall philosophy about youth-centered leadership and personal growth. It can be used to determine group action in a chapter or class or to plan individual projects.

    Planning Process:

    • Identify Concerns
      • brainstorm to generate ideas
      • evaluate your list and narrow it down
    • Set A Goal
      • clear mental picture
      • goal is achieved and evaluated
      • consider resources available
    • Form A Plan
      • decide what needs to be done
      • figure out who, what, where, when, and how
      • list other available resources
      • make a workable timetable
      • list possible barriers
      • decide way to recognize accomplishments
    • Act
      • carry out group or individual plan
      • use family and community members when needed
    • Follow Up
      • determine if goal was met
      • list improvements
      • share and publicize efforts
      • recognize members and thank people

    Balancing a Career, Family, and Leisure Activities
    Discuss with students that when they make a career decision, they may want to consider the roles they plan to have. A role is a set of responsibilities and expectations that go with an aspect of your life.

    Examples could include:

    • citizen
    • community member
    • consumer
    • employee
    • family member
    • friend
    • homemaker
    • neighbor
    • spouse and parent
    • student
    • volunteer
    • worker

    They must figure out a way to manage their time to meet these demands.

    One of the benefits of a hospitality career is that many of the jobs have flexible or part-time work hours.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Personal Activities Calendar
    • Rubric for Participation in The Balancing Act Activity
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes (Key)
    • The Balancing Act Activity
    • Way to Go Certificate

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Hold a class discussion on what is time management. Have them write a list of daily activities (from extracurricular, studying, practices, and so forth) and have them rank those activities from most important to least important.
    • Brainstorm examples of decisions that a person might make. Ask them to identify emotional versus logical aspects of decision making. Then write this prompt on the board, “When faced with a spur-of-the-moment decision, why can pausing for a moment make a difference?” Discuss. Then have them create scenarios in groups for the class to react to and answer.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Website:

    • Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
      A nonprofit national career and technical student organization for young men and women in Family and Consumer Sciences education.
      http://www.fcclainc.org/

    Principles of Time Management Module One Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Time management refers to a range of:

    • a. skills
    • b. tools
    • c. techniques
    • d. all of the above

    2. An example of how to use time management effectively is:

    • a. delegating tasks to the appropriate people
    • b. controlling all aspects of the work environment
    • c. missing deadlines
    • d. working after hours

    3. Decision making and problem solving are ongoing processes of:

    • a. evaluating situations or problems
    • b. considering alternatives
    • c. making choices
    • d. following up with necessary actions
    • e. all of the above

    4. The third step in the FCCLA Planning Process is:

    • a. Set a Goal
    • b. Follow Up
    • c. Form a Plan
    • d. Identify Concerns

    5. The last step in the FCCLA Planning Process is Follow Up which means to decide what needs to be done.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • II. Leadership and Teamwork Skills

    Wooden mannequins pushing puzzle pieces into the right place

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives

    • (A) apply team-building skills
    • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (C) apply teamwork and leadership qualities in creating a pleasant work environment
    • (D) determine the impact of cultural diversity on teamwork
    • (E) participate in community service opportunities to enhance professional skills

    Module Content

    Leadership and Teamwork Skills is the second unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Problem solving
    • B. Team building
    • C. Community service

    A. Problem Solving

    Problem solving is the process of working through details of a problem to reach a solution. Problem solving may include mathematical or systematic operations and can be a gauge of an individual’s critical thinking skills.

    Students often respond impulsively and emotionally to problems. Teach them how to slow down and think about the choices and analyze consequences through problem solving.

    There are seven main steps to follow when trying to solve a problem:

    • Define and Identify the Problem
    • Analyze the Problem
    • Identify Possible Solutions
    • Select the Best Solutions
    • Evaluate Solutions
    • Develop an Action Plan
    • Implement the Solution

    B. Team Building

    Students will learn about team building and recognize the lifelong benefits and practice these skills.

    Benefits of teamwork:

    • A team can accomplish more than an individual.
    • Complex problems require integrated thinking (division of labor).
    • Community and workplace structures require team thinking and group consensus.
    • Everyone operates as a member of many teams.
    • Identified “team skills” can be taught, learned, and transferred to others.
    • Morale improves when people identify themselves as a part of a successful team.
    • Team players are more likely to be hired, retained, and promoted.

    Guidelines for Building a Strong Team:

    • Establish a team vision – “What are we capable of accomplishing?” “What are our dreams?”
    • Build trust with others – “People need to know you care before they care what you know.”
    • Believe in your own self worth – “Success comes in cans, failures in cannots.”
    • Practice your leadership skills.
    • Help each other be right – rather than be wrong.
    • Help each other win – and take pride in each other’s accomplishments.
    • Speak positively about each other – and about your organization at every opportunity.
    • Do everything with enthusiasm – it’s contagious!
    • Believe in what you are doing – never give up!
    • Whatever you want – give it away.
    • Have fun – communicate that fun to others.

    C. Community Service

    Community service is donated service or activity that is performed by someone or a group of people for the benefit of the public or its institutions.

    Performing community service is not the same as volunteering, since it is not always done voluntarily. It may be done for a variety or reasons:

    • governments may require it as a part of citizenship requirements, typically in lieu of military service;
    • courts may demand it in lieu of, or in addition to, other criminal justice sanctions;
    • school may mandate it to meet the requirements of a class, such as in the case of service-learning or to meet the requirements of graduation.

    FCCLA Community Service Program
    Guides students to develop, plan, carry out, and evaluate projects that improve the quality of life in their communities.
    Community Service helps young people build skills for family, career, and community roles; provides youth-centered learning experiences related to Family and Consumer Sciences education; and encourages young people to develop the positive character traits of trustworthiness, respect, responsibility, fairness, caring, and citizenship.

    Students can prepare themselves for a future career by volunteering in a chosen field, completing an internship or working with a mentor who can help them network.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Students may work on a team building project for their school to bring awareness to a special cause.
    • Students can reach out to their local Convention & Visitors Bureau responsible for promoting and marketing their community and work on a community project/event.
    • Develop a list of possible guest speakers from your local area in the travel and tourism industry to talk about how Team Work, Problem Solving, and Diversity play a role in their industry.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
      A nonprofit national career and technical student organization for young men and women in Family and Consumer Sciences education.
      http://www.fcclainc.org/

    Leadership and Teamwork Module Two Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Problem solving is the process of:

    • a. finding the problem
    • b. finding a solution to a problem
    • c. finding the consequences of the problem
    • d. team building

    2. The first step to follow when trying to solve a problem is:

    • a. Analyze the Problem
    • b. Evaluate Solutions
    • c. Define and Identify the Problem
    • d. Develop an Action Plan

    3. One of the benefits of teamwork is that it can accomplish more than an individual.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    4. Community service is:

    • a. paid work
    • b. volunteer work
    • c. government mandated
    • d. a donated service or activity

    5. A team player is:

    • a. more likely to get hired
    • b. more likely to have better self-worth
    • c. better at relationships
    • d. all the above

  • III. Management Principles

    Business Team Signing Contract

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organization systems, and the larger environment of the travel and tourism industry.

    • (A) explain the functions and interactions of departments within a travel and tourism business
    • (B) explain the functions and interactions of various travel and tourism businesses
    • (C) implement quality-control systems and practices
    • (D) develop and manage plans to accomplish organizational goals
    • (E) formulate collaboration with other industries to provide an all-inclusive product for the customer

    (11) The student uses technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the travel and tourism industry.

    • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary
    • (I) demonstrate an understanding of tourism sales and distribution systems

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the travel and tourism industry.

    • (D) correctly calculate using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations
    • (E) investigate the elements of geography that affect travel and tourism customer service
    • (F) summarize how to use the state of the economy to plan products and service

    Module Content

    Management Principles is the third unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Numerical concepts
    • B. Products and services
    • C. Industry functions
    • D. Quality control systems

    Refer to lesson Crunching Numbers: Budgeting and Forecasting for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/crunching-numbers-budgeting-and-forecasting

    Refer to lesson Here, There, Everywhere: The Geography of Travel for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/here-there-everywhere-the-geography-of-travel

    A. Numerical Concepts

    Knowing basic math is a is a business skill as the travel industry runs on numbers.

    • How many hotel rooms are available for the holiday season?
    • How much profit was made?
    • How far is destination A to destination B?
    • What percentage of travelers rent cars?
    • What is the price for vacation package that includes air, hotel, meals, recreation activities, and souvenirs?

    For more details on the numerical concepts, see Travel and Tourism Management Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problem written specifically for this course, see:
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Hospitality-and-Tourism-Travel-and-Tourism-Management-Math-Assessment-Problems.pdf

    B. Products and Services

    Product refers to anything a business sells. It includes goods and services.

    A good is an item you can touch.

    A service is an activity that is done for another person.

    The four P’s of marketing goods and services are:

    • product
    • price
    • place
    • promotion

    Quality service meets or exceeds customer expectations.

    Customers compliment these service elements:

    • cleanliness and attractive appearance of facilities and grounds
    • employees who respond quickly to requests
    • employees who anticipate customer needs

    C. Industry Functions

    The travel industry consists of businesses that physically move people from one place to another.

    Modes of travel include:

    • automobile
    • bus
    • train
    • ship
    • airplane

    The tourism industry consists of businesses that organize and promote travel and vacations.

    Tourism industry businesses include:

    • travel agencies
    • tour operators
    • cruise companies
    • meeting and convention planners
    • convention and visitors bureaus
    • local and national tourism bureaus

    Their main function is to plan vacations and tours.
    Another function is to encourage people to travel.

    When people travel, they spend money on:

    • transportation
    • food
    • lodging
    • recreation

    D. Quality Control Systems

    Total Quality Management (TQM) and Quality Control (QC) are two systems used in the travel industry.

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a process that empowers all levels of employees to work in groups to establish guest service expectations and determine the best way to meet or exceed these expectations. It focuses on error prevention.

    Quality control (QC) is generally based on industrial systems and tends to be product oriented rather than service oriented.
    It focuses on error detection.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Have students research the different types of products and services offered in the industry. Have them pick one and do an informative project on their selection.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Management Principles Module Three Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A local high school is planning their senior trip to Thrills ‘n’ Spills Theme Park. The general admission price is $59.99 per person. If the theme park will give a group rate of 20%, how much will it cost for the entire senior class of 352 students to go to Thrill ‘n’ Spills?

    • a. $4,223.30
    • b. $10,343.70
    • c. $16,893.18
    • d. $21,116.48

    2. The tourism industry consists of:

    • a. businesses that organize social events
    • b. businesses that organize and promote travel research
    • c. businesses that organize and promote careers in travel
    • d. businesses that organize and promote travel and vacations

    3. A product refers to anything a business sells. It includes:

    • a. price
    • b. goods and services
    • c. taxes
    • d. tips

    4. The travel industry consists of:

    • a. businesses that physically move people from one place to another
    • b. businesses that sell vacation souvenirs
    • c. businesses that provide goods and services
    • d. businesses that promote the travel industry

    5. Quality Control (QC) is a process that empowers all levels of employees to work in groups to establish guest service expectations and determine the best way to meet or exceed these expectations. It focuses on error prevention.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • IV. Communication Skills

    communication2

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the travel and tourism industry.

    • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as itineraries, thank you letters, presentations, and advertisements
    • (C) deliver different types of presentations such as informative, instructional, persuasive, and decision-making

    (2) The student uses oral and written communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information.

    • (A) employ verbal skills when obtaining and conveying information
    • (B) use verbal and nonverbal communication skills effectively with individuals such as customers, coworkers, and employers to foster positive relationships
    • (C) develop and deliver presentations using appropriate technology to engage and inform audiences

    (11) The student uses technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the travel and tourism industry.

    • (J) demonstrate knowledge of destination and attraction planning and development, including the use of organizations such as convention and visitor’s bureaus and state tourist boards

    Module Content

    Communication Skills is the fourth unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Written composition
    • B. Verbal and nonverbal communication
    • C. Presentation skills

    Refer to lesson Here, There, Everywhere: The Geography of Travel for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/here-there-everywhere-the-geography-of-travel

    A. Written Composition
    Writing is an important skill in the travel industry and a major way to record and transmit information.

    It includes:

    • using a keyboard on a computer to enter information
    • a server taking an order for a customer
    • a housekeeper writing information on a room status
    • a manager writing reports

    Writing Composition would be used for:

    • itineraries
    • thank you letter/notes
    • presentations
    • advertisements
    • announcements
    • planning and development
    • memos
    • business letters
    • emails

    B. Verbal and Nonverbal Communication

    Verbal Communication
    Verbal means using words.

    Two aspects of verbal communication:

    • language you choose to use
    • choice of words in that language

    Language Choice
    Standard English is the language of business communication. It includes all the rules of grammar and spelling.

    In some travel and tourism businesses, a second language may be needed.

    Benefits of speaking a second language:

    • communicating with foreign visitors
    • opportunity work to in foreign companies

    Word Choice is important both in spoken and written language. Words should always convey professionalism and politeness.

    Nonverbal Communication
    Nonverbal means without words. It is communication of information and feelings without using words.

    It includes body language such as:

    • facial expressions
    • posture
    • hand gestures
    • tone of voice

    Nonverbal actions communicate warmth and concern for the customer.

    C. Presentation Skills

    Speaking
    Ranges from formal presentations to informal conversations.. It occurs whenever you say something.

    It includes:

    • words you choose
    • posture
    • tone of voice

    Effective presentations and public speaking skills are important in the travel and tourism management business.

    Presentation skills can:

    • increase sales and selling
    • create effective training, teaching, and lecturing
    • entertain and captivate an audience

    Developing the confidence and capability to give good presentations and to stand up in front of an audience and speak well are also extremely helpful competencies for self-development. It takes a little preparation and practice.

    Presentation formats can include:

    • informational
    • educational or training sessions
    • lectures
    • multimedia
      • PowerPoint™
      • videos
      • audio

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Have students write and send Thank You letters to someone in the travel industry.
    • Students can create a persuasive argument on a topic of choice (you choose) and have a debate. This gives them the opportunity to use different types of communication skills.
    • Role play different scenarios with customer relations.
    • Develop a marketing brochure that shows all the guest services they would offer at an establishment.
    • Play Telephone! Give a few students different messages. Have them whisper it to a classmate, and then that classmate to the next. When every classmate has received the message, have the last one tell the entire class that they heard. Then discuss.
    • Have a class discussion on information that students have received that was misconstrued and how that affected them.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Communication Skills Module Four Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Writing composition in the travel industry can be used for:

    • a. itineraries
    • b. presentations
    • c. business letters
    • d. all of the above

    2. The benefits of speaking a second language in the travel industry are:

    • a. less money and prestige
    • b. more work hours and insurance
    • c. weekends and holidays off
    • d. communication and opportunities

    3. Body language includes:

    • a. facial expressions
    • b. posture
    • c. hand gestures
    • d. all of the above

    4. Presentation formats include:

    • a. formal and informal
    • b. multimedia
    • c. lectures
    • d. all of the above

    5. Presentation skills can create effective training, teaching, and lecturing in the travel industry.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • V. Guest Services

    customer service2

    TEKS Addressed

    (11) The student uses technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the travel and tourism industry.

    • (A) develop job specific technical vocabulary
    • (B) use marketing techniques to sell products and services
    • (C) evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
    • (D) use different types of payment options
    • (E) analyze customer service concepts
    • (F) evaluate customer service scenarios
    • (G) describe how customer service affects a company’s bottom line
    • (H) develop an awareness of cultural diversity to enhance travel planning by exploring differences in social etiquette, dress, and behaviors of different countries
    • (J) demonstrate knowledge of destination and attraction planning and development, including the use of organizations such as convention and visitor’s bureaus and state tourist boards

    Module Content

    Guest Services is the fifth unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Industry vocabulary
    • B. Selling process
    • C. Marketing research
    • D. Cultural diversity

    A. Industry Vocabulary
    The Travel and Tourism Industry has a unique vocabulary in different sections in the industry.

    Some of these sections include:

    • hospitality
    • service
    • lodging
    • front office
    • housekeeping
    • security
    • engineering
    • management
    • human resources
    • marketing and sales
    • accounting
    • workplace safety
    • legal and ethical considerations
    • careers
    • entrepreneurship

    It is important for your students to understand the terminology of the travel industry to be able to work successfully and provide service to the customers.

    Assign vocabulary terms and definitions to students when you cover each section. Assess students with a quiz or test.

    B. Selling Process

    The selling process may include such events as:

    • the initial contact
    • product demonstrations
    • price negotiations
    • signing of contracts
    • delivery of the product or service

    Steps of the Sales Process are:

    • product knowledge
    • prospecting
    • approach
    • needs assessment
    • presentation
    • close
    • follow-up

    Two types of selling occur in the travel and tourism industry:

    • suggestive selling
    • group sales

    Suggestive selling is recommending additional products or services to a customer while that customer is buying something else. This type of selling can increase sales and often guests are pleased with the recommendations.

    Group sales consist of:

    • selling meals
    • lodging
    • facility services

    Groups may include:

    • corporations
    • professional associations
    • charitable groups
    • social groups

    Job titles for people who work in sales include:

    • salesperson
    • sales representative
    • account executive
    • director of catering
    • banquets manager
    • sales agent
    • sales manager

    Sales people must have:

    • good people skills
    • friendly attitudes
    • attention to detail

    C. Marketing Research
    Marketing research is done to learn about the market and potential customers. It is used to decide which market segment to target.

    Marketing research helps when you need to make decisions about:

    • product
    • price
    • place
    • promotion

    Meeting the needs of diverse and large markets is difficult, so the market can be divided into subgroups or segments.
    A marketing segment has similar needs and wants for the product.

    A segment might be based on age and can include:

    • children
    • teens
    • adults
    • senior citizens

    Family size is another market segment and can include:

    • singles
    • couples
    • families with children

    Activity segments may include:

    • business people
    • shoppers
    • sightseers
    • people going to the show

    Income segments might include:

    • low
    • moderate
    • high
    • very high

    A good target market has the four characteristics:

    • it is easy to identify
    • it is large
    • it is able to afford your product
    • it is willing to buy your product

    D. Cultural Diversity
    Diversity is the quality of being different and unique.

    Workplace diversity relates to:

    • gender
    • age
    • language
    • ethnicity
    • cultural background
    • disability
    • sexual orientation
    • religious belief

    The principles of workplace diversity are:

    • Treat each other with respect and dignity
    • Provide a safe, secure and healthy workplace
    • Make decisions genuinely based on equity and fairness
    • Value the diversity of people
    • Take appropriate action to eliminate discrimination
    • Promote awareness of workplace
    • Embrace workplace diversity principles in recruitment/hiring

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Creative Marketing: Divide students into subgroups and create a marketing campaign using different techniques to sell unique products and services. Have students present and vote on what group was the most creative.
    • Students may role-play customer service scenarios. Evaluate each one and discuss how customer service affects the company’s bottom line.
    • Diversity: create awareness by having students create a presentation on cultural attractions by exploring and researching different areas around the world. How are travel, social, etiquette, dress, and behaviors different? How does it affect the travel industry and workplace?
    • Take a field Trip to different types of hotels, compare and contrast the guest services.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
      Established in 1953, the Educational Institute, one of the finest nonprofit member benefits of the American Hotel and Lodging Association, is the premier source for delivering quality hospitality education, training and professional certification that serves the needs of hospitality schools and industries worldwide.
      http://www.ahlei.org
    • ITA Office of Travel & Tourism Industries
      The goal of the Office of Travel and Tourism Industries (OTTI) is to enhance the international competitiveness of the U.S. travel and tourism industry and increase its exports, thereby creating U.S. employment and economic growth.
      http://www.tinet.ita.doc.gov

    Guest Services Module Five Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The selling process does NOT include:

    • a. product demonstrations
    • b. comparing prices with other companies
    • c. price negotiations
    • d. delivery of the product or service

    2. The last step of the sales process is:

    • a. follow up
    • b. close
    • c. needs assessment
    • d. approach

    3. Group sales consists of:

    • a. selling meals
    • b. lodging
    • c. facility services
    • d. all of the above

    4. Marketing segments do NOT include:

    • a. children, teens, adults, senior citizens
    • b. singles, couples, families with children
    • c. product, price, place, promotion
    • d. business people, shoppers, sightseers or people going to the show

    5. Diversity is the quality of being different and unique.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • VI. Industry Research

    travel decisions

    TEKS Addressed

    (3) The student solves problems using critical-thinking skills independently and in teams.

    • (A) generate creative ideas by brainstorming possible solutions
    • (B) guide individuals through the process of making informed travel decisions
    • (C) use principles of budgeting and forecasting to maximize profit and growth for travel and tourism establishments
    • (D) analyze customer comments to formulate improvements in services and products and training of staff

    Module Content

    Industry Research is the sixth unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Critical thinking skills
    • B. Making informed travel decisions
    • C. Budgeting and forecasting
    • D. Improving services and products

    Refer to lesson Travel Adventures for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/travel-adventures

    Refer to lesson Crunching Numbers: Budgeting and Forecasting for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/crunching-numbers-budgeting-and-forecasting

    Module VI Handouts

    A. Critical Thinking Skills

    Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully:

    • conceptualizing
    • applying
    • analyzing
    • synthesizing
    • evaluating information gathered

    It is gathered from, or generated by:

    • observation
    • experience
    • reflection
    • reasoning
    • communication, as a guide to belief and action

    In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions:

    • clarity
    • accuracy
    • precision
    • consistency
    • relevance
    • sound evidence
    • good reasons
    • depth
    • breadth
    • fairness

    Critical thinking is self-guided, self-disciplined thinking which attempts to reason at the highest level of quality in a fair-minded way.

    View YouTube™ video to learn more:

    B. Making Informed Travel Decisions

    Decisions that need to be made when traveling may be:

    • arranging transportation by air, sea, rail, bus, or car rental
    • preparing individual itineraries, personally escorted tours, group tours, and prepared package tours
    • arranging for hotel, motel, and resort accommodations; meals, sightseeing tours; transfers of passengers an luggage between terminals and hotels; and special features such as tickets for music festivals and the theater
    • handling and advise many details involved with travel, such as insurance, foreign currency exchange, documentary requirements, and immunizations
    • arranging reservations for special-interest activities, such as group tours, conventions, business travel, gourmet tours, and sporting trips

    Internet travel services have changed the way we book travel. There are many travel sites to choose from.
    As consumers, we can shop for the best price and most convenient schedules.

    C. Budgeting and Forecasting

    Travel and Tourism will continue to expand faster than the economy as a whole and faster than comparable industries.

    According to the Texas Travel Industry Association:

    • as many as 106,00 businesses depend upon travel as a significant source of revenue
    • travel generates $3.6 billion in federal taxes, $3 billion in state taxes, and $1.1 billion in local taxes
    • job growth in the travel industry is outpacing the overall Texas average
    • jobs supported by the travel industry have an overall annual wage of $31,200
    • travel industry employs more young and female workers and provides significant self-employment opportunities
    • travel industry part-time and seasonal jobs provide many Texans with the flexibility they need to earn income while going to school

    D. Improving Services and Products
    Service is an activity that is done for another person.
    Product is anything that a business sells.

    Improving the quality of products or services involves:

    • making sure you give your customers the level of quality they expect
    • making sure your quality is equal to, or higher than, that offered by your competitors
    • continually monitoring and improving quality

    Students will consider the following:

    • Find out what quality your customers expect and if they would like your business to have a quality award.
    • Check what you currently do to measure and improve quality in the operational, technical and management parts of your business and compare it to what your competitors do.
    • Set or review targets for quality for all parts of your business that take account of your customers’ expectations.
    • Take advice from experts when you need it.
    • Assess the skills and attitudes of any staff to improve quality.
    • Identify any problems in making improvements, and take prompt action to deal with them.
    • Identify new opportunities and threats and change quality plans as necessary.
    • Use the results of monitoring to review the effectiveness of your business.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VI Handouts

    • Customer Comments
    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ or Prezi™ Travel Adventures Presentation
    • Travel Adventures Project
    • Travel Decisions
    • Travel Decisions (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Develop a product or service for the travel industry project. Divide students into subgroups of three or four. Each group develops a product or service for the travel industry using their critical thinking skills.
    • Research on how people make informed travel decisions.
    • Invite a local member of the travel and tourism bureau to talk about budget and forcast.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • The Critical Thinking Community
      The Foundation and Center for Critical Thinking aim to improve education in colleges, universities and primary through secondary schools.
      http://www.criticalthinking.org//
    • The Texas Travel Industry Association (TTIA)
      The umbrella organization and advocate for the travel industry in Texas.
      http://www.ttia.org/
    • The World Travel & Tourism Council (WTTC)
      The forum for business leaders in the Travel & Tourism Industry.
      http://www.wttc.org/

    YouTube™:

    Industry Research Module Six Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully:

    • a. conceptualizing and applying
    • b. analyzing and synthesizing
    • c. evaluating information gathered
    • d. all of the above

    2. Internet travel services have allowed us to:

    • a. book online
    • b. shop for the best price
    • c. choose convenient schedules
    • d. all of the above

    3. Travel and Tourism will continue to expand slower than the economy as a whole and faster than comparable industries.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    4. According to the Texas Travel Industry Association, travel generates billions in federal, state, and local taxes.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. Service is an activity that:

    • a. is physical
    • b. costs money
    • c. is done for another person
    • d. generates money

  • VII. Industry Regulations and Compliance

    claim form

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student understands the importance of health, safety, and environmental systems in the travel and tourism industry and their importance to organizational performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) identify hazards common to workplaces such as safety, health, and environmental hazards
    • (B) use industry standards to implement safety precautions to maintain a safe work site
    • (C) demonstrate first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation
    • (D) describe environmental procedures that ensure a facility is in compliance with health codes
    • (E) describe how to respond to emergency situations
    • (F) analyze potential effects caused by common chemicals and hazardous materials
    • (G) analyze security measures to protect the guests, customers, and staff and to limit liability

    Module Content

    Industry Regulations and Compliance is the seventh unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Safety hazards
    • B. Health codes
    • C. Security measures

    Refer to lesson Safety Guidelines – Travel and Tourism Management for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-travel-and-tourism-management/

    Module VIIa Handouts
    Module VIIb Handouts

    A. Safety Hazards
    A hazard is a situation that could result in an accident or an emergency.
    Safety consists of actions taken to prevent accidents and emergencies.

    Employees should be alert to accidents and potentially dangerous physical conditions.

    Hazard recognition is the first step in the process of establishing and maintaining a safe working environment as it leads to the identification and control of high risk activities which can cause injuries and illness.

    Become familiar with the Occupational Safety and Health Act for Young Workers at:
    http://www.osha.gov/youngworkers/index.html

    Young workers get injured or sick on the job for many reasons, including:

    • Unsafe equipment
    • Inadequate safety training
    • Inadequate supervision
    • Dangerous work that is illegal or inappropriate for youth under 18
    • Pressure to work faster
    • Stressful conditions

    Workplace hazards associated with specific jobs are another major cause of injuries and illnesses.
    Employers must work to reduce or minimize hazards in the workplace and train employees how to work safely on the job.

    Any situations considered to be hazards should be reported to the manager or supervisor.

    OSHA
    With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

    B. Health Codes

    Health codes are a set of standards set forth and enforced by a local government agency for the protection of public safety, health, and so forth, as in:

    • the structural safety of buildings (building code)
    • health requirements for plumbing, ventilation, and more (sanitary or health code)
    • the specifications for fire escapes or exits (fire code)

    Appropriately responding to accidents and injuries also includes proper equipment such as first aid kits, fire extinguishers and smoke detectors as well as first aid and CPR training for employees.

    Health inspections are regularly conducted by the local health department.

    These inspections include:

    • kitchen
    • storage
    • bar
    • restaurant areas

    Inspectors look for compliance with:

    • sanitation
    • standards
    • absences of pests
    • proper care and handling of food
    • proper food storage techniques
    • correct temperature of wash water

    A health inspection certificate may be issued after an inspection.

    Emergency Action Plan
    An employer must have an emergency action plan whenever an OSHA standard in this part requires one. The purpose of an EAP is to facilitate and organize employer and employee actions during workplace emergencies.

    C. Security Measures
    Security consists of actions taken to prevent crime and to protect the safety of people and property. The emphasis is prevention.

    Security Outline

    All employees have a responsibility for security and must be alert to problems and know what to do in emergencies.

    Security responsibilities:

    • Protection
    • Threats
    • Liability
      • limits
      • risk of lawsuits
      • insurance
    • Security staff
    • Maintaining security

    Building Security features:

    • Buildings
    • Guest rooms
    • Technology

    Security Policies:

    • Employee IDs
    • Room keys
    • Entrance doors
    • Lost and found
    • Special procedures

    Surveillance:

    • People
    • Physical Conditions
    • Routine Tasks

    Students will be able to classify the latest developments and events affecting the industry, and how managers within the industry have the responsibility for implementing new regulations and comply to ensure safety for guest and customers.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VIIa Handouts
    Module VIIb Handouts

    • All About OSHA
    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • Job Safety and Health – It’s the Law! Poster
    • OSHA at a Glance
    • Retail Food Establishment Inspection Report
    • Rubric for Group Safety Video
    • Safety Guidelines Notes
    • Safety Guidelines Notes (Key)
    • TFER Handwashing Poster
    • Worker’s Rights

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Invite a guest speakers from the City Department of Heath, Food and Safety, Hotel/Guest Security and a Hospitality lawyer to talk to your class
    • Hold a First Aid/CPR Course by a trained professional
    • Have students choose a profession within the travel and tourism sector that deals with safety hazards, health code, or security and research the importance of the job and how it directly affects: guests, customers, staff and the travel industry. Present to class.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Website:

    • Occupational Safety and Health Administration – Young Workers
      With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.
      http://www.osha.gov/youngworkers/index.html

    Industry Regulations Module Seven Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Any situations considered to be hazardous should be reported to:

    • a. another employee
    • b. a manager
    • c. the janitor
    • d. your friend

    2. OSHA stands for:

    • a. Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    • b. Occupational Sanitation and Health Administration
    • c. Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration
    • d. Occupational Sanitation and Hazard Administration

    3. Health codes are a set of standards set forth and enforced by a:

    • a. state government agency
    • b. national government agency
    • c. government safety agency
    • d. local government agency

    4. An Emergency Action Plan is for:

    • a. personal emergencies
    • b. workplace emergencies
    • c. local and state emergencies
    • d. environmental emergencies

    5. The emphasis of security measures is:

    • a. hazards
    • b. guest safety
    • c. prevention
    • d. emergency procedures

  • VIII. Information Technology

    Instructor Speaking to Students in Computer Class

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student uses information technology tools specific to the travel and tourism industry to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (A) operate electronic mail applications to communicate within a workplace
    • (B) distinguish among the different modes of travel such as airline, cruise line, and rail
    • (C) differentiate among recreation, amusement, attraction, and resort venues
    • (D) use technology applications to perform workplace tasks
    • (E) understand the travel arrangements system used for booking reservations
    • (F) employ computer operations applications to manage work tasks
    • (G) create complex multimedia publications

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the travel and tourism industry.

    • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as itineraries, thank you letters, presentations, and advertisements

    (11) The student uses technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the travel and tourism industry.

    • (C) evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
    • (J) demonstrate knowledge of destination and attraction planning and development, including the use of organizations such as convention and visitor’s bureaus and state tourist boards

    (2) The student uses oral and written communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information.

    • (C) develop and deliver presentations using appropriate technology to engage and inform audiences

    Module Content

    Information Technology is the eighth unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Verbal skills
    • B. Workplace technology

    Refer to lesson Calculating the Cost of a Destination Vacation for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/calculating-the-cost-of-a-destination-vacation/

    Module VIII Handouts

    A. Verbal Skills
    Electronic communication refers to the use of electronic technology for communication.

    Devices for electronic communication includes:

    • computers
    • cell phones
    • two-way radios
    • pagers
    • hand-held computers

    The successful businessperson must know how to use all of these devices.

    E-mail has become an important communication technology and may be used:

    • in place of business letters
    • for internal communications
    • communicate with in-house departments
    • to alert customers to special promotions
    • to order supplies

    B. Workplace Technology
    The Internet has had a large impact on the travel and tourism industry.

    Examples of the use of technology in the industry include:

    • airlines – information on flights, make reservations, purchase tickets
    • restaurants – menu, location, hours, and specials
    • hotels – room rates, location, and information

    Some websites enable you to research several travel and tourism businesses at once.

    Travelocity.com provides information for the following choices:

    • flights
    • lodging
    • cars/rail
    • vacations
    • cruises
    • deals

    Computer Software Systems

    Property Management System in the lodging industry keeps track of:

    • guests
    • employees
    • finances

    Enterprise System combines information from the property management system in each property for businesses that have more than one hotel.

    Point-of-Sales Systems are used in the food and beverage industry with a touch screen to:

    • record orders
    • send orders to the kitchen
    • calculate charges and taxes
    • keep track of items sold
    • take inventory
    • record payments
    • generate customer checks

    Computers also help with sanitation as dish washing machines and laundry machines come equipped with computerized systems. These systems keep track of water temperatures and instruct the machines to use exactly the amount of detergent needed.

    Human Resources Information System (HRIS) is the computer system that human resources departments use for personnel records.

    An HRIS system keeps track of:

    • employee information
      • attendance
      • wage history
      • anniversary of hire date
      • birth date
      • disciplinary records
      • names
      • addresses
      • social security numbers

    A security system is a computerized burglar detection and alarm system.

    Electronic key systems enters a new combination code on a key for the guest room door. When the guest leaves, new combinations are quick and easy to make.

    Table Management Systems are used in restaurants to seat customers in the most efficient way. A pager is used to signal to the customer that a table is available.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VIII Handouts

    • Calculating Costs Worksheet
    • Calculating the Costs of a Destination Vacation Notes
    • Calculating the Costs of a Destination Vacation Notes (Key)
    • Rubric for Oral Presentation of Vacation Costs

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Students can create a brochure that encompasses local attractions and theme parks, public and commercial recreation facilities, resort venues and shopping as attractions. Choose different cities and towns across the USA for each student to research, then present.
      You can do the same for modes of travel, have students design a cruise, road trip, train travel and compare and contract airlines!
    • Create Their own Attraction: Draw a “bird’s eye” view or Create a 3D Model
      1. Select a name and theme
      2. Select your location; explain why that location was chosen (central location in U. S., climate, geographical, etc.)
      4. List ways they would advertise their attraction
      5. List 5 jobs the attraction creates

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Information Technology Module Eight Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Devices for electronic communication includes:

    • a. computers and cell phones
    • b. two-way radios and pagers
    • c. hand-held computers
    • d. all of the above

    2. E-mail in the workplace has become an important communication technology and may be used to:

    • a. communicate with your relatives
    • b. communicate with in-house departments
    • c. communicate with previous employers
    • d. communicate with your friends

    3. Point-of-Sales Systems are used in the food and beverage industry with a touch screen to:

    • a. record orders and send orders to the kitchen
    • b. calculate charges and taxes
    • c. keep track of items sold and take inventory
    • d. all of the above

    4. An HRIS system keeps track of:

    • a. employee information
    • b. guest information
    • c. conference information
    • d. event information

    5. Table Management Systems are used in hotels to book rooms.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • IX. Employability Skills

    your career

    TEKS Addressed

    (9) The student knows and understands the importance of employability skills and is able to explore and effectively plan for managing travel and tourism careers.

    • (A) identify behaviors necessary to be employable and maintain employment such as positive work ethics and positive personal qualities
    • (B) identify the training and education requirements that lead toward an appropriate certification for employment
    • (C) demonstrate skills related to seeking employment in the travel and tourism industry
    • (D) demonstrate proper interview techniques
    • (E) update a career portfolio
    • (I) interpret the effect of stress, fatigue, and anxiety on job performance
    • (J) complete required employment forms such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licensures to meet employment requirements

    Module Content

    Employability Skills is the ninth unit of study in the Travel and Tourism Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Employment skills
    • B. Professional portfolio
    • C. Career performance


    Refer to lesson Careers in Travel and Tourism Management for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-travel-and-tourism-management/

    Refer to lesson Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/get-that-job-resumes-portfolios-and-interview-skills-5/

    Module IX Handouts

    A. Employment Skills
    Students should identify behaviors necessary to be employable and maintain employment such as positive work ethics and positive personal qualities.

    Job qualifications for someone in various positions in the travel and tourism industry include but are not limited to the following:

    • patience
    • high energy level
    • positive attitude
    • ability to juggle several tasks
    • pleasant

    Personal qualities needed:

    • honesty
    • willingness to work hard
    • team player
    • willingness to work long hours
    • ability to deal with stress
    • good decision-making skills
    • good communication skills
    • dedicated to exceptional service
    • desire to exceed guest expectations

    Allow students to explore careers in Travel and Tourism Management that includes but not limited to:

    • Travel Agent
    • Reservation Specialist
    • Tour Specialist
    • Event Planner
    • Activities Director
    • Hotel/Motel desk clerk
    • Restaurant Manager.

    B. Professional Portfolio

    Career portfolios are used to:

    • plan
    • organize
    • document
      • education
      • work samples
      • skills

    People use career portfolios to:

    • apply for jobs
    • apply to college or training programs
    • get a higher salary
    • show transferable skills
    • to track personal development

    They are more in-depth than a resume, which is used to summarize the above in one or two pages.

    Career portfolios serve as proof of one’s:

    • skills
    • abilities
    • potential in the future

    Many school programs will have you create, update, and use a career portfolio before moving on to the next level in life.

    A career portfolio should be personal and contain critical information.

    Items that should be included (but are not limited to) are:

    • personal information
    • evaluations
    • sample work
    • awards and acknowledgments

    Career portfolios are often kept in a simple three-ring binder or online as an electronic portfolio and updated often. In some industries, employers or admission offices commonly request a career portfolio, so it is a wise idea to have an updated one on hand.

    C. Career Performance
    The travel and tourism industry can be be very demanding and has both positive and negatives sides.

    Some challenges to job performance are:

    • hours of work
    • stress
    • working conditions
    • relocation

    Hours
    Many employees in the industry work long hours, nights, weekends, and holidays. Students need to understand that they may be working while their friends are playing. But working long hours may include overtime pay and that would be an advantage.

    Stress

    This is a feeling of tension that can result in:

    • having many tasks to do at the same time
    • not having enough time to complete tasks
    • having many difficult tasks to do
    • having dangerous tasks
    • having unpredictable tasks

    Some physical stress-management techniques are:

    • massage
    • stretching
    • contracting-relaxing
    • physical activity and aerobic exercise

    Some mental/emotional stress-management techniques:

    • active listening
    • time management
    • primal scream
    • talk to a friend
    • assertiveness training
    • breathing
    • guided imagery
    • physical activity and aerobic exercise

    The four R’s of coping with stress:

    • Rethink
    • Reduce
      • Three A’s of Coping
        • abolish
        • avoid
        • alter
    • Relax
    • Release

    Working Conditions
    Some travel and tourism industries have poor working conditions such as poor air conditioning or unsanitary practices. Generally, most companies have good working conditions.

    Relocation
    Advancement in this industry could require relocation. That would mean moving from one place to another for your job. If one chooses not to move, then a career in another section of the travel and tourism industry may be an option.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IX Handouts

    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Are You a Teen Worker
    • Basic Information for Writing a Résumé (half sheet)
    • Career Portfolio Sections
    • Career Portfolio Sections (Key)
    • Education and Training in Travel and Tourism Management
    • Employment Application
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Form W-4 (2013)
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes (Key)
    • Job Opportunities in Travel and Tourism
    • Job Opportunities in Travel and Tourism (Key)
    • Job Performance
    • My Employability Skills Checklist
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz (Key)
    • Rubric for Career Portfolio
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Rubric for Electronic Glogster™ EDU Poster
    • Sample Career Portfolio Checklist
    • Sample Résumé Template
    • Service Learning Log
    • Travel and Tourism Director (PDF)
    • Travel and Tourism Director (Excel)
    • Travel and Tourism Management Careers O*Net Flashcards

    Teaching Strategies/Lessons Ideas

    • Distribute the blank application and Interview Questions for homework a few days before holding mock interviews, allowing students time to complete the application and practice their responses to the interview questions. Encourage students to dress appropriately for the interview and bring their career portfolio, resume, application, and Interview Questions to the interview. Ask students to find a partner. Each will portray an interviewer and interviewee and ask questions from their Interview Questions. Close the lesson by asking for volunteers to be interviewed by you in front of the class. Allow the audience to provide positive feedback and suggestions for improvement.
    • Create a game of Charades and have the students act out different skills needed in the Travel and Tourism industry.
    • Walk students through employment forms such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licenses to meet employment requirements.
    • Help students identify stress: Have students list changes in their life, work, and school that they have felt stress from. Why did or does it stress them, and what can they do to help with the stress?

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Reynolds, J.S. (2010) Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley-Park, Illinois: The Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Walker, K.R. (2010). Introduction to hospitality management. Upper Saddle River, NJ. Pearson Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    • Achieve Texas
      An education initiative designed to prepare students for a lifetime of success
      http://www.achievetexas.org
    • Career Clusters
      Nationwide, Career Technical Education (CTE) programs are changing, evolving and innovating to better serve the country’s needs.
      http://www.careertech.org/career-clusters
    • Labor Market and Career Information
      http://www.lmci.state.tx.us
    • Small Business Administration:
      http://www.sba.gov
    • Texas Workforce Commission: Our mission is to promote and support an effective workforce system that offers employers, individuals and communities the opportunity to achieve and sustain economic prosperity. http://www.twc.state.tx.us
    • U.S. Department of Labor:
      Small business is America’s most powerful engine of opportunity and economic growth.
      http://www.sba.gov
    • U.S. Department of Labor – Occupational Outlook Handbook
      The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor is the principal Federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.
      http://www.bls.gov/oco

    Employability Module Nine Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Personal qualities needed for a career in the travel and tourism industry are:

    • a. willingness to work hard
    • b. team player
    • c. willingness to work long hours
    • d. all of the above

    2. Career portfolios are used to plan, organize, and document:

    • a. education, work samples, and skills
    • b. family pictures
    • c. social media contacts
    • d. cell phone contact information

    3. Stress is a feeling of tension that can result in:

    • a. having many tasks to do at the same time
    • b. not having enough time to complete tasks
    • c. having many difficult tasks to do
    • d. all of the above

    4. A physical stress-management techniques may be:

    • a. working more hours
    • b. crying
    • c. eating
    • d. massage

    5. The four R’s of coping with stress are:

    • a. Rethink, Reduce, Relax, Release
    • b. Recap, Reduce, Relax, Retrain
    • c. Repeat, Release, Reduce, Relax
    • d. Reconnect, Retract, Rejuvenate, Release

  • Quiz

    Travel and Tourism Management Online Course

    Progress:

    1. Time management refers to a range of:

    2. An example of how to use time management effectively is:

    3. Decision making and problem solving are ongoing processes of:

    4. The third step in the FCCLA Planning Process is:

    5. The last step in the FCCLA Planning Process is Follow Up which means to decide what needs to be done.

    6. Problem solving is the process of:

    7.The first step to follow when trying to solve a problem is:

    8. One of the benefits of teamwork is that it can accomplish more than an individual.

    9. Community service is:

    10. A team player is:

    11. A local high school is planning their senior trip to Thrills ‘n’ Spills Theme Park. The general admission price is $59.99 per person. If the theme park will give a group rate of 20%, how much will it cost for the entire senior class of 352 students to go to Thrill ‘n’ Spills?

    12.The tourism industry consists of:

    13. A product refers to anything a business sells. It includes:

    14.The travel industry consists of:

    15. Quality Control (QC) is a process that empowers all levels of employees to work in groups to establish guest service expectations and determine the best way to meet or exceed these expectations. It focuses on error prevention.

    16. Writing composition in the travel industry can be used for:

    17. The benefits of speaking a second language in the travel industry are:

    18. Body language includes:

    19. Presentation formats include:

    20. Presentation skills can create effective training, teaching, and lecturing in the travel industry.

    21. The selling process does NOT include:

    22. The last step of the sales process is:

    23. Group sales consist of:

    24. Marketing segments do NOT include:

    25. Diversity is the quality of being different and unique.

    26. Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully:

    27. Internet travel services have allowed us to:

    28. Travel and Tourism will continue to expand slower than the economy as a whole and faster than comparable industries.

    29. According to the Texas Travel Industry Association, travel generates billions in federal, state, and local taxes.

    30. Service is an activity that:

    31. Any situations considered to be hazardous should be reported to:

    32. OSHA stands for:

    33. Health codes are a set of standards set forth and enforced by a:

    34. An Emergency Action Plan is for:

    35. The emphasis of security measures is:

    36. Devices for electronic communication includes:

    37. E-mail in the workplace has become an important communication technology and may be used to:

    38. Point-of-Sales Systems are used in the food and beverage industry with a touch screen to:

    39. An HRIS system keeps track of:

    40. Table Management Systems are used in hotels to book rooms.

    41. Personal qualities needed for a career in the travel and tourism industry are:

    42. Career portfolios are used to plan, organize, and document:

    43. Stress is a feeling of tension that can result in:

    44. A physical stress-management technique may be:

    45. The four R’s of coping with stress are:

    46. CTE stands for:

    47. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    48. TEKS stands for:

    49. Travel and Tourism Management is part of the ______________ Career Cluster.

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with:

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