Restaurant Management Online Course

  • Restaurant Management Online Course Introduction

    This course will emphasize the principles of planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling the management of a variety of food service operations. The course will provide insight into the operation of a well-run restaurant. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Restaurant Management is one of 12 courses in the Human Services career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Modifications for the Special Education and English Language Proficient Students
    Many links provided in this course can also be translated into Spanish or other languages for your ELPS students so they may understand the information. An auditory symbol may be visible and can be used for your Special Education students so that they can hear the information as they read it.

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and seven modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. 12 pre-assessment multiple choice statements can be found at the end of the Introduction. Each module ends with five multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to the Introductory Lesson: Restaurant Management for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-restaurant-management/

    Restaurant Management: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Which of the following is not a casual-dining establishment?

    • a. quick-service restaurants
    • b. family-style restaurants
    • c. vending machines
    • d. buffet restaurants

    2. This type of dining caters to people who like to eat out , but are not interested in a formal atmosphere or high prices. They enjoy a relaxed environment and mid-range prices.

    • a. fine dining
    • b. theme
    • c. casual dining
    • d. quick service

    3. Food service-specific bachelor’s degrees offer students

    • a. food management skills.
    • b. hands-on training in food preparation techniques.
    • c. guaranteed apprenticeships.
    • d. guaranteed entry-level jobs

    4. Slips, trips, and falls can best be avoided when spills are cleaned:

    • a. before you leave work.
    • b. immediately.
    • c. after the customers leave.
    • d. before the lunch or dinner rush.

    5. The term restaurant is derived from the the French word restaurer which means to

    • a. restore one’s appetite.
    • b. rest and relax.
    • c. restore one’s health.
    • d. be served food.

    6. The Federal Minimum Wage is

    • a. $4.25 per hour.
    • b. $6.50 per hour.
    • c. $7.25 per hour.
    • d. $7.45 per hour.

    7. Servers in restaurants may get paid $ __________ per hour because tips are considered part of their wages.

    • a. $2.13
    • b. $3.13
    • c. $7.25
    • d. $5.45

    8. Restaurant trends are not influenced by

    • a. society.
    • b. children.
    • c. the economy.
    • d. culture.

    9. Which employment law states that only U.S. citizens and people who are authorized to work in the United States may be legally hired?

    • a. Equal Employment Opportunities Act
    • b. Immigration Reform and Control Act
    • c. Immigration and Nationality Act
    • d. Federal Employment Compensation Act

    10. Who determines the hourly minimum wage that employers can pay employees?

    • a. Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    • b. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    • c. Individual business owners
    • d. the federal government

    11. Teen workers may be more susceptible to work injuries because of

    • a. lack of experience.
    • b. feelings of invulnerability.
    • c. enthusiasm to learn.
    • d. doing tasks for which they are either unprepared or incapable of performing safely.

    12. The most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States, and the most common cause of foodborne deaths is.

    • a. salmonella.
    • b. E.coli 0157:H7.
    • c. campylobacter.
    • d. staphylococcus aureus.

  • I. Restaurant Industry Overview

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry.

    • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (D) infer how scientific principles are used in the restaurant industry

    (4) The student uses information technology tools specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (E) evaluate internet resources for information

    (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the restaurant industry.

    • (C) differentiate between various styles of restaurant services such as table, buffet, and fast food
    • (D) illustrate various place settings using proper placement of dining utensils
    • (E) demonstrate the proper service techniques in food service operations

    (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depend on personal effort.

    • (E) follow directions and procedures independently

    Module Content

    Restaurant Industry Overview is the first unit of study in the Restaurant Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. History of Restaurants
    • B. Types of Restaurants
    • C. Restaurant Trends

    Refer to lesson Math + Science = Quality Food for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/math-science-quality-food

    Module One Handouts

    History of Restaurants

    The term restaurant is derived from the the French word restaurer which means to restore one’s health and dates back to ancient times with vendors and cooks selling food in the streets and later travelers stopping to eat at inns, taverns, monestaries and hostelries during their travels.

    According to the current edition of Larousse Gastronomque (p. 194-5), the first cafe (generally defined as places selling drinks and snacks) was established in Constantinople in 1550. It was a coffee house, hence the word “cafe.” Cafes were places educated people went to share ideas and new discoveries. Patrons spent several hours in these establishments in one “sitting.” This trend caught on in Europe in the 17th century. When cafes opened in France, they also sold brandy, sweetened wines and liqueurs in addition to coffee. The first modern-type cafe was the Cafe Procope which opened in 1696.

    The French Revolution launched the modern restaurant industry. It relaxed the legal rights of guilds that [since the Middle Ages] were licensed by the king to control specific foods [eg. the Patissiers, Rotisseurs, Charcutiers] and created a hungry, middle-class customer base who relished the ideals of egalitarianism (as in, anyone who could pay the price could get the same meal). Entrepreneurial French chefs were quick to capitalize on this market. Menus, offering dishes individually portioned, priced and prepared to order, were introduced to the public for the first time.

    Who started the first restaurant?

    There are (at least) three theories:

    • Boulanger, 1765
      “In about 1765, a Parisian ‘bouillon seller’ named Boulanger wrote on his sign: ‘Boulanger sells restoratives fit for the gods’…This was the first restaurant in the modern sense of the term.”
      —-Larousse Gastronomiqe, completely revised and updated [Clarkson Potter:New York] 1999 (p. 978)
    • Mathurin Roze de Chantoiseau in Paris, 1766
      “According to Spang, the forgotten inventor was Mathurin Roze de Chantoiseau, a figure so perfectly emblematic of his time that he almost seems like an invention himself. The son of a landowner and merchant, Roze moved to Paris in the early 1760s and began floating a variety of schemes he believed would enrich him and his country at the same time.”
      http://dir.salon.com/books/review/2000/03/24/spang/index.html
    • Beauvilliers, 1782
      “However, the first Parisian restaurant worthy of the name was the one founded by Beauvilliers in 1782 in the Rue de Richelieu, called the Grande Taverne de Londres. He introduced the novelty of listing the dishes available on a menu and serving them at small individual tables during fixed hours.”
      —-Larousse Gastronomique, (p. 978)

    Fine dining

    Types of Restaurants

    Different types of dining appeal to different customers. The following are the five most common types of dining and differ in menu prices, decor, food served, and the way food is served.

    • Fine Dining
      Has an environment with excellent food, elegant decor, and superior services and customers are willing to pay top prices for their meals.
    • Theme
      Often try to recreate another place or time. Customers enjoy seeing sports memorabilia or an indoor waterfall and are moderately priced.
    • Casual-Dining
      Attracts people who like to eat out, but are not interested in a formal atmosphere or high prices. They enjoy a relaxed environment and mid-range prices.
      • Family-Style
        Menu is limited, traditional, and child friendly. Prices are mid-range.
      • Neighborhood establishment
        Lunch counters and coffee shops are popular. Food is simple, inexpensive and served in generous portions.
      • Grills and buffets
        • Offer self-service meals at budget prices. Buffets often offer all-you-can-eat specials.
        • Trayline service
          Customers going through a food line and placing items on their own trays.
      • Customer service
        Consists of customers sitting at a counter.
      • Vending machines
        Offer a wide variety of of foods and beverages and operate 24 hours a day.
    • Quick-Service Restaurants
      Also known as fast food, these make up the largest section of the foodservice industry. It has limited menus, low prices, and speedy service. Food is prepared using exact standards and factory-like production.
      • Food court
        Gives shoppers convenient access to a variety of quick meals, snacks, and beverages at malls and shopping centers.
    • Catering Services
      Are a growing segment of the foodservice industry. A caterer purchases, receives, stores, prepares, cooks, delivers, and serves food to a customer in another location. Catered meals vary in size.
      • Contract Foodservice
        For a management fee, a foodservice contractor will provide food and beverage service for organizations such as schools, businesses, hospitals, and nursing homes.
      • Airline Meals
        Food catered for an airline is limited by storage needs and transportation. Meals are prepared in a commissary and maybe full meals or just snacks and beverages.
      • Hotel and motel restaurants
        Offer longer service hours and offer three meals a day, seven days a week.
        • Room service
          Involves servers bringing specially ordered meals to a customer’s room.
      • Cruise ship dining
        Excellent food is a highlight of cruise ships as there is no limit on the amount of food and the cost is included in the price of the cruise.

    Refer to the lesson Setting Tables with Service and Style to practice service skills, table setting knowldege and learn to create beautiful, intricate napkin folds.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/setting-tables-with-service-and-style/

    Restaurant Trends

    May be influenced by society, culture, ethnic diversity, population changes, or the economy. The foodservice industry has changed as the needs and wants of its customers has changed.
    Trends in foodservice include restaurants that offer:

    • themes
    • a family friendly atmosphere
    • ethnic foods
    • operations in sport facilities
    • special events and private parties
    • more healthful food options and are environmentally friendly
    • prepared and packaged ready-to-eat meals

    View short YouTube videos on the latest trends in the food industry.

    • What’s Hot in 2012
      The National Restaurant Association surveyed nearly 1,800 professional chefs – members of the American Culinary Federation – on hot trends on restaurant menus in 2012. Local sourcing and children’s nutrition are among the hottest trends.
      http://youtu.be/cUSJcp2Jd-8
    • Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011
      The Food Channel® presents its Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011. The list is based on research conducted by The Food Channel in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International.
      http://youtu.be/vHg6IGISCPM
    • Top Ten Food Trends for 2012
      The Food Channel has released our 2012 Trends Forecast — the top ten food trends we see for the coming year. This report is put together in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International. Here’s a look at what we see happening in the world of food for 2012.
      http://youtu.be/ES7zw1SL2Cc

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module One Handouts

    • Dining Today
    • Rubric for Napkin Folds, Table Setting, and Service
    • Tableware Identification

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Discuss current trends in the restaurant industry by asking your students what new items, specials, fads are happening with food.
    • Become familiar with Glogster EDU before assigning a poster to your students. It is easy and your students will enjoy making a virtual poster.
    • Assign students different foods to find the history of on the food timeline and write and design a poster using http://edu.glogster.com. Students may add a video if there is one available.
    • Assign graphic organizer Types of Dining and have students document the names of local eating establishments for each type.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.

    Websites:

    • The food timeline
      Food history presents a fascinating buffet of popular lore and contradictory facts. Some experts say it’s impossible to express this topic in exact timeline format. They are correct. Most foods are not invented; they evolve.
      http://foodtimeline.org/

    YouTube:

    • What’s Hot in 2012
      The National Restaurant Association surveyed nearly 1,800 professional chefs – members of the American Culinary Federation – on hot trends on restaurant menus in 2012. Local sourcing and children’s nutrition are among the hottest trends.
      http://youtu.be/cUSJcp2Jd-8
    • Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011
      The Food Channel® presents its Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011. The list is based on research conducted by The Food Channel in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International.
      http://youtu.be/vHg6IGISCPM
    • Top Ten Food Trends for 2012
      The Food Channel has released our 2012 Trends Forecast — the top ten food trends we see for the coming year. This report is put together in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International. Here’s a look at what we see happening in the world of food for 2012.
      http://youtu.be/ES7zw1SL2Cc

    Restaurant Management Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. According to The food timeline website, what year was the first restaurant started? http://foodtimeline.org/restaurants.html#restaurants

    • a. 1765
    • b. 1766
    • c. 1782
    • d. 1785

    2. This type of restaurant often tries to recreate another place or time. Customers enjoy seeing sports memorabilia or an indoor waterfall and are moderately priced.

    • a. fine dining
    • b. quick-service
    • c. family style
    • d. theme

    3. Also known as fast food, this type of dining makes up the largest section of the foodservice industry. It has limited menus, low prices, and speedy service. Food is prepared using exact standards and factory-like production.

    • a. fine dining
    • b. quick-service
    • c. family style
    • d. theme

    4. Restaurant trends are influenced by

    • a. society
    • b. culture
    • c. economy
    • d. all of the above

    5. Catering services are NOT part of the foodservice industry.

    • a. true
    • b. false

  • II. Employability and Career Development

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry.

    • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations
    • (D) infer how scientific principles are used in the restaurant industry

    (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees.

    • (A) develop, deliver, and critique presentation
    • (C) demonstrate proper techniques for answering restaurant phones
    • (D) interpret verbal and nonverbal cues to enhance communication with coworkers, employers, customers, and clients
    • (E) apply active listening skills to obtain and clarify information

    (7) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives.

    • (A) apply team-building skills
    • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (C) determine leadership and teamwork qualities to aid in creating a pleasant working atmosphere
    • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills

    (4) The student uses information technology tools specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (E) evaluate internet resources for information

    (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort.

    • (A) demonstrate a proactive understanding of self-responsibility and self-management
    • (B) identify behaviors needed to be employable and maintain employment such as positive work ethics and positive personal qualities
    • (C) analyze the effects of health and wellness on employee performance
    • (D) implement stress-management techniques
    • (E) follow directions for procedures independently

    (10) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing

    • (B) analyze various steps in the career decision-making process
    • (C) discuss the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities

    (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation, and maintenance of technological systems.

    • (A) define job-specific technical vocabulary

    (11) The student knows and understands the importance of employability skills.

    • (A) demonstrate skills related to seeking employment in the restaurant industry
    • (B) identify the required training and educational requirements that lead toward an appropriate industry certification
    • (C) select educational and work highlights to include in a career portfolio
    • (D) update a personal career portfolio
    • (E) complete required employment forms such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licensures to meet employment requirements
    • (F) research the local and regional labor workforce market to determine opportunities for advancement
    • (G) investigate professional development training opportunities to keep current on relevant trends and information within the industry
    • (H) explore entrepreneurship opportunities

    Module Content

    Employability and Career Development is the second unit of study in the Restaurant Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Career Opportunities
    • B. Education and Training
    • C. Employability Skills


    Refer to lesson Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-the-restaurant-industry-connecting-education-and-employment

    Refer to Front of the House: Leadership and Teamwork for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/front-of-the-house-leadership-and-teamwork

    Refer to lesson Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills for additional activities, ideas and resources. http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/get-that-job-resumes-portfolios-and-interview-skills-2/

    Refer to lesson Back to the Future – An Introduction to Sustainability in Food Service for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/back-to-the-future-an-introduction-to-sustainability-in-food-service

    Refer to lesson Math + Science = Quality Food for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/math-science-quality-food

    Module IIa Handouts

    Module IIb Handouts

    Career ladder

    Career Opportunities
    Refer to lesson Careers in the Restaurant Industry: Connecting Education and Employment for slide presentation, handouts, graphic organizer, and federal employment forms.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-the-restaurant-industry-connecting-education-and-employment/

    The foodservice industry is about people. It continues to change and grow to meet the needs of its customers. Two types of foodservice jobs are dealing directly with customers and the other does the actual food preparation.

    Service Staff

    Sometimes called front-of-the-house staff because they work outside of the kitchen. They included:

    • Host – greets the customers
    • Server
      • represents the foodservice operation
      • sells the menu
      • serves menu items skillfully
      • receives the correct payment from the customer
    • Busser – maintains tables and service station
    • Cashier – correctly reads the amount of the bill, processes the payment, and makes change.

    Kitchen Brigade

    Divides the responsibilities for the preparation of food. Can include:

    • Line Cook/Station Cook – work on the food production line
    • Sous Chef – “under” chef supervises and sometimes assists other chefs in the kitchen.
    • Pastry Chef – responsible for making baked items.
    • Prep Cook – prepares ingredients to be used by the line cooks.
    • Garde Manager – or “pantry” chef is responsible for preparing cold food items.

    Management Opportunities

    Offered to people who have the right work experience, training, and education. Can include:

    • Executive Chef – manages all kitchen operations
    • Research Chef – works closely with food scientists to produce new food products
    • Culinary Scientist – combines culinary arts and food science to set new standards in food technology
    • Foodservice Director – manages the banquet operations of hotels, banquet facilities, hospitals, and universities
    • Catering Director – coordinates food for special events and functions
    • Kitchen Manager – orders ingredients for menu dishes and makes sure they are prepared correctly
    • Dining Room Supervisor – coordinates and assigns duties to the serving staff such as hosts, servers, and bussers
    • Restaurant Manager – oversees the entire restaurant

    View the short videos about working in restaurants.

    • Gordon Ramsay’s Restaurant Tips
      Gordon gives us his top five tips for running a restaurant.
      http://youtu.be/n3jHA8sH-N0
    • 2012 Faces of Diversity – Bahjat Shariff
      The National Restaurant Association’s Faces of Diversity awards program celebrates restaurants and industry professionals who contribute to and embrace the diversity that makes the restaurant industry so successful. Meet Bahjat Shariff, Senior Vice President of Operations and Operating Partner for Panera Bread/Howley Bread Group in Cumberland, R.I. – winner of the 2012 Faces of Diversity American Dream Award.
      http://youtu.be/C_vhnG10AfU

    The graphic organizer Restaurant Industry Jobs/Careers may be distributed to students to outline employment opportunities.

    Education and Training

    Begin preparing for a career in the food service industry in high school and continue through various programs such as:

    • Culinary classroom learning
      Enrolling in Culinary Arts and Restaurant Management while still in high school can begin a foodservice career.
      Continuing your education in the food industry can include:
    • Certification Programs
      These programs require work experience, coursework, and a test. Certification is proof that you are an expert in a specific topic.
    • Associate’s Degree Programs
      Usually take two years to complete and offer classroom based instruction as well as hands-on practice.
    • Bachelor’s Degree Programs
      These programs prepare you for management jobs in the foodservice industry and usually take four years to complete and give an in-depth training in one or more areas of study.

    Training can include entry-level part-time employment that does not require higher level education or experience but can lead to other positions. Other training opportunities can include:

    • Apprenticeships – work under the guidance of a skilled worker to learn the skills of a particular trade or art.
    • Corporate Training Programs – offer special training programs for their employees
      • McDonald’s Hamburger University
        At McDonald’s, our training mission is to be the best talent developer of people with the most committed individuals to Quality, Service, Cleanliness & Value. That was true in 1961 and is still true today. Learn about Hamburger University, one of the world’s first corporate universities.
        http://youtu.be/p0iEM6UT9Vc
    • Military Training Programs – the branches of the military can provide foodservice training
    • On-the-Job Training Programs – learn while working in the field
      • job rotation – entry-level employees are rotated through a series of jobs
      • internship – paid or unpaid, advanced students work at foodservice businesses to get hands-on training

    Employability Skills
    The skills students need to find a job in food service are the same skills needed to find and keep a job in any other field. Those will include:

    • Math Skills – calculating numbers; adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing
      • Weighing and Measuring – ingredients must be accurately weighed and measured for recipes
      • Working with Percentages – in recipes and in sales tax
      • Making Change – to count back the correct amount of change to a customer

    Refer to the Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Math Assessment Problems in our website for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/classroom-essentials/best-practices/

    • Listening and Speaking Skills
      • Active Listening – the skill of paying attention and interacting with the speaker
      • Speaking Skills – be sure to pronounce words clearly and correctly, do not use slang, speak at a medium pace and regulate your volume
      • Telephone Skills – speak calmly, clearly, and at a medium volume and be polite and helpful
      • Body Language – how you physically respond in the way you sit, stand, move your hands, look, and smile or frown, send a clear message as you speak to customers, coworkers, and supervisors.
    • Writing Skills – will need to use every day for business letters, work orders, menus, and more.

    Refer to the Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Writing Prompts on our website for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/classroom-essentials/best-practices/

    • Reading Skills – understanding ingredient labels, recipes, equipment instructions, menus, workplace policies and manuals

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module IIa Handouts

    Module IIb Handouts

    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Are You A Teen Worker
    • Back to the Future Consensogram Template
    • Back to the Future Notes
    • Back to the Future Notes (Key)
    • Basic Information for Writing a Résumé (half sheet)
    • Career Portfolio Sections
    • Career Portfolio Sections (Key)
    • Conflicts in the Worplace – Scenarios
    • Education and Training in the Restaurant Industry
    • Employment Application
    • FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet
    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Food Industry Careers
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Front of the House – Leadership and Teamwork Notes
    • Front of the House – Leadership and Teamwork Notes (Key)
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes (Key)
    • Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems
    • My Employability Skills Checklist
    • Occupational Outlook Handbook Flashcards
    • Pros and Cons of Employment Opportunities
    • Restaurant Industry Jobs/Careers
    • Restaurant Industry Jobs/Careers (Key)
    • Restaurant Management Writing Prompts
    • Restaurant Safety Quizzes
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz (Key)
    • Rubric for Career Portfolio
    • Rubric for Community Leadership and Teamwork Experience
    • Rubric for Community Leadership and Teamwork Experience2
    • Rubric for Multimedia Prezi™ Presentation
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation
    • Sample Career Portfolio Checklist
    • Sample Résumé Template
    • Service Learning Log
    • Sustainability in Food Service – Where We Stand Today E-zine Article Review
    • Sustainability in Food Service – Where We Stand Today E-zine Article Review (Key)
    • Sustainability Vocabulary Quiz
    • Sustainability Vocabulary Quiz (Key)
    • Sustainable Food Service Webquest
    • Sustainable Food Service Webquest (Key)
    • Steps to Resolve Conflicts
    • W-4 (2014)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Practice telephone answering skills with your students. Make up different scenarios for them to use.
    • Assign the Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems.
    • Assign the Hospitality and Tourism Restaurant Management Writing Prompts.
    • Invite community business people to speak to your class about their careers in the food industry. Can include:
      • restaurant managers
      • food service directors
      • catering directors
      • executive chefs

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.

    YouTube:

    • Gordon Ramsey’s Restaurant Tips
      Gordon gives us his top five tips for running a restaurant.
      http://youtu.be/n3jHA8sH-N0
    • 2012 Faces of Diversity – Bahjat Shariff
      The National Restaurant Association’s Faces of Diversity awards program celebrates restaurants and industry professionals who contribute to and embrace the diversity that makes the restaurant industry so successful. Meet Bahjat Shariff, Senior Vice President of Operations and Operating Partner for Panera Bread/Howley Bread Group in Cumberland, R.I. – winner of the 2012 Faces of Diversity American Dream Award.
      http://youtu.be/C_vhnG10AfU
    • McDonald’s Hamburger University
      At McDonald’s, our training mission is to be the best talent developer of people with the most committed individuals to Quality, Service, Cleanliness & Value. That was true in 1961 and is still true today. Learn about Hamburger University, one of the world’s first corporate universities.
      http://youtu.be/p0iEM6UT9Vc

    Restaurant Management Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. In management opportunities, who is the person that orders the ingredients for the menu items and makes sure they are prepared correctly?

    • a. the restaurant manager
    • b. the food service director
    • c. the kitchen manager
    • d. the sous chef

    2. In Gordon Ramsey’s Restaurant Tips video, what does he say is the number one tip for running a restaurant?

    • a. leadership
    • b. passion
    • c. commitment
    • d. competition

    3. What is the first thing a student still in high school interested in the foodservice industry should do?

    • a. enroll in a culinary arts or restaurant management class
    • b. enroll in a business class
    • c. enroll in an internship program
    • d. join the military

    4. The ____________ represents the foodservice operation, sells the menu, serves menu items skillfully, and receives the correct payment from the customer.

    • a. host
    • b. cook
    • c. busser
    • d. server

    5. The purpose of this form is to document that each new employee (both citizen and noncitizen) hired after Novermber 6, 1986, is authorized to work in the United States.

    • a. work visa
    • b. social security card
    • c. W-4
    • d. I-9

  • III. Human Resource Operations

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student used information technology tools specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (E) evaluate internet resources for information

    (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the restaurant industry.

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) investigate quality-control standards and practices

    (8) The student knows and understands the importance of professional ethics and legal responsibilities within the restaurant industry.

    • (A) demonstrate ethical reasoning in a variety of workplace situations in order to make decisions
    • (B) interpret and explain written organizational policies and procedures to help employees perform their jobs
    • (C) develop guidelines for professional conduct

    Module Content

    Human Resources Operations is the third unit of study in the Restaurant Management course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Laws and Regulations of Human Resources
    • B. Employee Relations
    • C. Personnel Management Process
    • D. Liability and Damages

    Refer to lesson Math + Science = Quality Food for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/math-science-quality-food

    Module Three Handouts

    Laws and Regulations of Human Resources

    Equal Employment Opportunities

    Laws protect different groups of people from discrimination and make sure that workers are treated fairly.

    • Affirmative Action – employers created programs to locate, hire, train, and promote women and minorities
    • Age Discrimination – protects people age 40 and older from being discriminated against in hiring, promotion, and wages
    • Sexual Harassment – unwelcome advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of sexual nature
    • Americans with Disabilities – makes it illegal to put a person with a disability in a lower-paying job only because of the disability

    safety first

    Employee Protection Laws

    • Wage and Labor Laws
      Federal child labor laws protect teens ages 14 and 15 from working too long, too late,
      or too early. Some state laws also limit the hours 16- and 17-year-olds can work. When
      you turn 18, child labor laws no longer protect you.
      For more information, refer to the Are You A Teen Worker? guide by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
      http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2012-130/pdfs/2012-130.pdf

    Allow students to practice filling in a generic Employment Application to gather needed information.

    Before students can be employed, they must answer two federal documents: the I-9 and W-4 forms. Take a look at these documents to become familiar with them.

    Teen workers also have rights at their place of employment. Share the handout Are You a Teen Worker? from the Department of Health and Human Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

    • View the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Young Worker Safety in Restaurants ETool. Explain to the students that restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many young workers’ first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help young workers in the restaurant industry be safe and healthy on the job. The eTool describes common hazards and potential safety solutions for teen workers and employers in the restaurant industry.
      http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/index.html

    Quizzes – Puzzle Game

    After students have read all of the restaurant modules, they are ready to take the quizzes and play the Restaurant Safety Puzzle Game!
    They will receive a puzzle piece for each quiz finished correctly. If they finish all the quizzes, the puzzle will be complete and they may print a completion certificate. If you close the puzzle board, you will lose your puzzle pieces and will need to start over.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    • Immigration Laws
      • The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986 states that only U.S. citizens and people who are authorized to work in the United States may be legally hired.
      • Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) of 1952 states that employers must fill out an Employment Eligibility Verification Form, or I-9, for each person they hire. Refer to I-9 handout for more details.
    • Workers’ Compensation
      Makes sure that injured or disabled workers can still have an income while they are unable to work.
    • Workplace Injuries and Deaths
      The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) mission is to ensure employee safety and health by setting and enforcing standards, providing training and education, and working with employers to improve workplace safety and health.

    Employee Relations

    Work Ethic

    A personal commitment to doing your very best as part of the team.

    • Responsibility – your ability to be aware of what a particular situation demands of you
    • Flexibility – the ability to adapt willingly to changing circumstances
    • Honesty – being truthful and loyal in words and actions
    • Reliability – other people can count on what you say and will do
    • Teamwork – effectively communicate, resolve conflicts, and develop negotiation skills
    • Commitment – the dedication that you show to doing something

    Ethical behavior means doing what is right. Making sure your decisions comply with the law and are fair.
    Mistakes will be made, but employees should take responsibility and admit the action. Responsible employees learn from their mistakes and will make better choices next time.

    The graphic organizer Work Ethics may be used with your students to emphasize the characteristics of positive employee/employer expectations. Allow students to give examples of each trait.

    Personnel Management Process

    Many foodservice businesses have their own management structure but most managers generally start as an employee of the business. With hard work and passion for the business, they may be promoted to oversee the cleaning staff and hosts. Depending on the size of the establishment, other management opportunities may include a Front of the House (FOH) and Back of the House (BOH) manager overseeing employees in those areas. Larger restaurants may divide duties as follows:

    • service managers – oversee the servers
    • bar managers – oversee beer, wine, and alcohol
    • kitchen managers – oversee cooks, food costs, and ordering
    • general managers – oversee the whole restaurant and make major decisions about sales, personnel and finances

    Effective managers are skilled in:

    • communication
      • employees
      • customers
    • time management
    • resource management
    • leadership

    Liability and Damages
    Accidents can easily occur in a busy kitchen. The government has written laws and codes to help protect workers on the job but it is also the personal responsibility of each worker to practice safety at all times. Government agencies such as The Occupational Safety and Health Administration the The Environmental Protection Agency help keep the workplace safe.

    The Cost of Foodborne Illnesses

    The National Restaurant Association figures show that one foodborne-illness outbreak can cost an operation thousands of dollars each year in the following areas:

    • loss of customers and sales
    • loss of reputation
    • negative media exposure
    • lowered staff morale
    • lawsuits and legal fees
    • staff missing work
    • increased insurance premiums
    • staff retraining

    Victims of foodborne illnesses may experience:

    • lost work
    • medical costs and long-term disability
    • death

    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety/video.html

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module Three Handouts

    • Are You a Teen Worker?
    • Employment Application
    • I-9
    • Restaurant Safety Quizzes
    • W-4 form
    • Work Ethics
    • Youth Minimum Wage

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Review the employment forms with your students such as the I-9 and W-2 forms before they begin to work.
    • Remind students that they have rights at their place of employment.
    • Allow students to fill out a sample employment application completely. Explain that some companies will not even look at applications that have blank spaces. They should provide you with references and phone numbers as well. Remind them that even babysitting, cutting lawns, taking care of elderly grandparents, etc. will provide them with valuable skills.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.

    Restaurant Management Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Which employment law prevents employers from hiring immigrants for low-skill, low-paying jobs without providing them with pension or insurance benefits?

    • a. Equal Employment Opportunities Act
    • b. Immigration Reform and Control Act
    • c. Immigration and Nationality Act
    • d. Federal Employment Compensation Act

    2. Which law makes it illegal to put a person with a disability in a lower-paying job only because of the disability?

    • a. Civil Rights Act
    • b. Americans with Disabilities Act
    • c. Equal Employment Opportunities Act
    • d. Federal Employment Compensation Act

    3. Who determines the hourly minimum wage that employers can pay employees?

    • a. Occupational Safety and Health Administration
    • b. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    • c. Individual business owners
    • d. The federal government

    4. Young people age 14 and under can work at which job?

    • a. babysitting
    • b. delivering newspapers
    • c. as an actor performer
    • d. all of the above

    5. Unwelcome advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of sexual nature is

    • a. age discrimination.
    • b. affirmative action.
    • c. sexual harassment
    • d. worker’s compensation

  • IV. Food Safety and Sanitation

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student uses information technology tool specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (E) evaluate internet resources for information

    (6) The student understands the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organizational performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) assess workplace conditions with regard to safety and health
    • (B) analyze potential effects caused by common chemicals and hazardous materials
    • (C) demonstrate first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills
    • (D) apply safety and sanitation standards common to the workplace
    • (E) research sources of food-borne illness and determine ways to prevent them
    • (F) determine professional attire and personal hygiene for restaurant employees

    (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort.

    • (E) follow directions and procedures independently

    Module Content

    Food Safety and Sanitation is the fourth unit of study in the Restaurant Management course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Managing Safety and Sanitation
    • B. Prevention of Food-borne Illness
    • C. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)

    Module Four Handouts

    Managing Safety and Sanitation

    Accidents can easily occur in a busy kitchen. This interactive module, Young Worker Safety in Restaurants from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, will teach the students to be safe in:

    • Serving
    • Clean-up
    • Drive-thru
    • Cooking
    • Food Preparation
    • Delivery
    • General
    • Resources

    Restaurants and other eating and drinking businesses employ 11.6 million people in the United States. Nearly 30% of these employees are under 20 years of age. Many young workers’ first work experience is in the restaurant industry. OSHA is providing this eTool to help young workers in the restaurant industry be safe and healthy on the job. After all the puzzle pieces are completed successfully, students may access a Teen Worker Safety Certificate of Achievement.
    http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/youth/restaurant/index.html

    Fight Bac!

    Prevention of Food-borne Illness

    Microorganisms can grow in and on food when it is not handled properly. Other conditions that can lead to foodborne illness outbreaks are:

    • cross-contamination
    • poor personal hygiene
    • food handler illness

    Tiny, single-celled microorganisms are called bacteria. Symptoms can include:

    • nausea
    • abdominal pain
    • vomiting
    • dizziness
    • chills
    • headache

    Visit the Partnership for Food Safety Education’s Fight BAC!® website for more information.

    • Least Wanted Foodborne Pathogens
      The U.S. Public Health Service has identified the following microorganisms as being the biggest culprits of foodborne illness, either because of the severity of the sickness or the number of cases of illness they cause. Beware of these pathogens: Fight BAC
      http://www.fightbac.org/about-foodborne-illness/least-wanted-pathogens

    Hazard analysis and critical control point (HACCP)
    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point is based on identifying significant biological, chemical, or physical hazards at specific points within a product’s flow. Once identified, the hazards can be prevented, eliminated or reduced to safe levels and is based on a written plan.

    The Seven HACCP Principles

    • Conduct a hazard analysis
    • Determine critical control points
    • Establish critical limits
    • Establish monitoring procedures
    • Identify corrective actions
    • Verify that the system works
    • Establish procedures for record keeping and documentation

    Use the graphic organizer The HACCP System with your students so they understand the process.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module Four Handouts

    • The HACCP System

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Food safety is of utmost importance in the Restaurant industry. Look for information to be certified as a food protection manager overseeing your courses. Then apply to be a certified instructor/proctor so that you can instruct and certify your students.
    • ServSafe Manager 6th Edition by the National Restaurant Association is an excellent source to teach your students about food safety. Ask your CTE Director for available funds, to be able to teach this course. The Food Protection Manager Certification is available to your students for a fee.
    • Check with your local health department to obtain local information to teach the Food Handler course. ServSafe also has a short program so that all of your students can obtain the basic two hour certification which will allow them to leave your classroom with employability skills.
    • Become familiar with the Restaurant Safety for Teen Workers eTool before you assign it to your students.
    • Assign the Young Worker Safety in Restaurants eTool by OSHA. After successful completion they will earn a Teen Worker Safety Certificate of Achievement.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.
    • (2012). Servsafe® manager. (6th ed.). Chicago, Illinois: National Restaurant Association.

    Restaurant Management Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What is the leading cause of death among teen workers in retail/service jobs?

    • a. homicides
    • b. automobile collisions
    • c. server burn injuries
    • d. serious cuts/lacertations

    2. Whenever a pot or pan is on a stove, the worker should assume that it is:

    • a. clean
    • b. hot
    • c. dirty
    • d. cool

    3. Teen workers may be more susceptible to work injuries because of:

    • a. lack of experience
    • b. feelings of invulnerability
    • c. enthusiasm to learn
    • d. doing tasks for which they are either unprepared or incapable of performing safely

    4. What is the first step in developing a HACCP plan?

    • a. identify corrective actions
    • b. conduct a hazard analysis
    • c. establish monitoring procedures
    • d. determine critical control points

    5. The most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States, and the most common cause of foodborne deaths.

    • a. salmonella
    • b. E.coli 0157.H7
    • c. campylobacter
    • d. staphylococcus aureus

  • V. Managing Restaurant Operations

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the restaurant industry.

    • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as agendas, menus, presentations and advertisements
    • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and estimations in practical situations
    • (D) infer how scientific principles are used in the restaurant industry
    • (E) use mathematics and science knowledge and skills to produce quality food products

    (2) The student used verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees.

    • ( B) analyze various marketing strategies for a restaurant or food venue

    (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovations and creativity independently and in teams.

    • (A) generate creative ideas to solve problems by brainstorming possible solutions
    • (B) employ critical-thinking and interpersonal skills to resolve conflicts with individuals such as coworkers, customers, clients, and employers
    • (C) use principles of budgeting and forecasting to maximize profit and growth

    (4) The student uses information technology tools specific to restaurant management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (A) use information technology tools to manage and perform work responsibilities
    • (B) use technology applications to perform workplace tasks
    • (C) prepare complex multimedia publications
    • (D) demonstrate knowledge and use of point-of-sale systems
    • (E) evaluate internet resources for information

    (5) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations and the larger environment of the restaurant industry.

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) investigate quality-control standards and practices
    • (C) differentiate between various styles of restaurant services such as table, buffet and fast food
    • (D) illustrate various place settings using proper placement of dining utensils
    • (E) demonstrate the proper service techniques in food service operations

    (9) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort.

    • (E) follow directions and procedures independently

    (10) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing.

    • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
    • (B) analyze various steps in the career decision-making process
    • (C) discuss the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities

    (12) The student understands the use of technical knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in the restaurant industry, including knowledge of design, operation and maintenance of technological systems.

    • (B) analyze customer comments to formulate improvements in services and products and training of staff
    • (C) detail ways to achieve high rates of customer satisfaction
    • (D) use different types of payment options to facilitate customer payments for services
    • (E) demonstrate technical skills used in producing quality food service

    Module Content

    Managing Restaurant Operations is the fifth unit of study in the Restaurant Management course. This section contains six TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Managing Food and Beverage Production
    • B. Purchasing, Receiving, and Storage Procedures
    • C. Managing cost
    • D. Customer Relations
    • E. Financial Analysis
    • F. Marketing Strategies

    Refer to lesson Customer Service – The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/customer-service-the-cornerstone-of-restaurant-operations

    Refer to lesson The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Restaurant Management for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-balancing-act-managing-a-career-and-family-restaurant-management

    Refer to lesson Math + Science = Quality Food for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/math-science-quality-food

    Module V Handouts

    Managing Food and Beverage Production

    Computerized systems now allow managers to look at the three elements that make most of an operation’s cost: food, beverages, and labor.

    Opening and Closing

    Managers are usually responsible for opening and closing a restaurant on a daily basis. A good manager has standard procedures for both.
    Opening a restaurant in the morning might include:

    • unlocking the front door and any storage area
    • turning on the lights and equipment
    • inspecting the facility for cleanliness
    • making sure all work stations are manned

    Closing a restaurant at the end of the day might include:

    • locking the door and storage areas
    • locking the safe
    • supervising the cleaning of the restaurant
    • filling out and filing daily paperwork, guest checks, balancing the cash drawer, writing the bank deposit, and writing equipment and service records
    • setting security measures after employees leave
    • turning off lights and equipment

    Purchasing, Receiving, and Storage Procedures
    Receiving is accepting deliveries of food and supplies. All food products must be carefully inspected for damage.

    Potential problems:

    • Foods that have been thawed and refrozen
    • Foods that have an insect infestation
    • Damaged foods or containers
    • Items that have been repacked or mishandled
    • Foods handled at incorrect temperatures

    Storage
    Follow good storage guidelines for food and nonfood items will help keep them safe and preserve their quality. Make sure they are labeled and dated.

    Storage order in the refrigerator

    • ready-to-eat food
    • seafood
    • whole cuts of beef and pork
    • ground meat and ground fish
    • whole and ground poultry

    Food should only be stored in a designated storage area away from wall and at least six inches off the floor.
    The graphic organizer Refrigerator Storage and Refrigerator Storage (Key) may be used with your students to illustrate proper storage in refrigerators.

    Managing Cost
    Money is needed to purchase food, hire staff, and market the business. This takes careful planning. The actions of every foodservice employee affect an operation’s profitability.

    Managing costs

    Effective Record-Keeping Systems

    Accounting software is available that can help keep track of financial information as well as:

    • Profits
    • Expenses – marketing, advertising, facility costs
    • Purchases, price lists, inventory
    • Reservations
    • Recipes and food costs
    • Work schedules, and employee hours and wages
      • i. Labor cost
        • Direct labor cost – wages paid to employees
        • Indirect labor cost – employee health insurance, taxes and vacations
      • ii. Food cost
        A facility’s food cost percentage is the ratio of the cost of food served to the sales of food served.
      • iii. Portion Control
        Foodservice operations should follow strict portion control guidelines to keep control costs and keep customers happy.
      • iv. Waste Control
        Develop policies to minimize waste:
        • follow strict inventory procedures
        • order only supplies and food needed
        • minimize waste during production
        • train employee to properly prepare food
        • train employee to properly use nonedible supplies

    Customer relations

    All foodservice employees, especially those who talk to customers, must possess the following qualities:

    • A positive attitude
    • A neat and clean appearance
    • Good communication and teamwork skills
    • Knowledge of job
    • Ability to resolve customer complaints positively

    Financial Analysis
    As a manager, you will want to know how money is being spent and how much profit is being made. A profit and loss statement shows exactly how money flows into and out of a business. It lists all the expenses for a specific period of time as well as the total sales.

    Marketing Strategies

    A plan of action that will let you know how your area will respond to your business.
    Marketing affects the location of the foodservice operation, what food products are offered, how items are promoted, and who presents the product.

    • Location
      One of the most important choices to make. Customers want easy, convenient access to their food choices. Think about traffic patterns.
    • Customer Base
      Clientele are the people who will be the business’s main customers. Analyze what type of people you want to attract.
    • Competition
      A competitor is a business that offers customers similar products or services to the ones that you offer.
    • Trends
      Business owners always need to keep the future in mind.

    Assign students the graphic organizer Restaurant Marketing Strategies to create a plan of action for a restaurant in their area.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module V Handouts

    • 12 Stress-Management Techniques
    • 12 Stress-Management Techniques (Key)
    • Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns – Solutions
    • Customer Reviews, Comments and Concerns
    • Customer Service – The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations Notes
    • Customer Service – The Cornerstone of Restaurant Operations Notes (Key)
    • Personal Activities Calendar
    • Refrigerator Storage
    • Refrigerator Storage (Key)
    • Restaurant Marketing Strategies
    • Rubric for Customer Service Demonstration
    • Rubric for Participation in The Balancing Act Activity
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes (Key)
    • The Balancing Act Activity
    • Way to Go Certificate

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Check with your local jurisdiction about regulations for the foodservice employees. Although most cities and counties have similar rules, each may have stricter guidelines or extra fees.
    • Review with your students the ServSafe® Food Manager book to study for certification exam.
    • Invite a local restaurant manager to speak to your class about food and labor costs.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.

    Restaurant Management Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Opening day managers might:

    • a. turn off lights and equipment.
    • b. unlock the front door and storage areas.
    • c. lock the doors and storage areas.
    • d. put away leftover food.

    2. How many inches from the floor should food be stored?

    • a. 1
    • b. 2
    • c. 4
    • d. 6

    3. The three elements that make up most of an operation’s cost are:

    • a. food, facilities, and labor
    • b. food, beverages, and facilities
    • c. beverages, labor, and insurance
    • d. food, beverage, and labor

    4. Direct labor costs are

    • a. wages paid to employees
    • b. employee health insurance, taxes, and vacations
    • c. a facility’s food cost percentage
    • d. marketing, advertising, and facility costs

    5. All foodservice employees, especially those who talk to customers, must possess the following qualities:

    • a. a positive attitude
    • b. a neat and clean appearance
    • c. good communication and teamwork skills
    • d. all of the above

  • VII. References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Guggenmos, K., & McVety, P. (2010). Culinary essentials. Woodland Hills, California: McGraw Hill, Glenco.
    • Anthony, V. (2011). Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts. Chicago, Illinois: Prentis Hall, Pearson.
    • (2012). Servsafe® manager. (6th ed.). Chicago, Illinois: National Restaurant Association.

    Websites:

    • The food timeline
      Food history presents a fascinating buffet of popular lore and contradictory facts. Some experts say it’s impossible to express this topic in exact timeline format. They are correct. Most foods are not invented; they evolve.
      http://foodtimeline.org/

    YouTube™:

    • What’s Hot in 2012
      The National Restaurant Association surveyed nearly 1,800 professional chefs – members of the American Culinary Federation – on hot trends on restaurant menus in 2012. Local sourcing and children’s nutrition are among the hottest trends.
      http://youtu.be/cUSJcp2Jd-8
    • Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011
      The Food Channel® presents its Top Ten Dessert Trends for 2011. The list is based on research conducted by The Food Channel in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International.
      http://youtu.be/vHg6IGISCPM
    • Top Ten Food Trends for 2012
      The Food Channel has released our 2012 Trends Forecast — the top ten food trends we see for the coming year. This report is put together in conjunction with CultureWaves®, the International Food Futurists® and Mintel International. Here’s a look at what we see happening in the world of food for 2012.
      http://youtu.be/ES7zw1SL2Cc
    • Gordon Ramsay’s Restaurant Tips
      Gordon gives us his top five tips for running a restaurant.
      http://youtu.be/n3jHA8sH-N0
    • 2012 Faces of Diversity – Bahjat Shariff
      The National Restaurant Association’s Faces of Diversity awards program celebrates restaurants and industry professionals who contribute to and embrace the diversity that makes the restaurant industry so successful. Meet Bahjat Shariff, Senior Vice President of Operations and Operating Partner for Panera Bread/Howley Bread Group in Cumberland, R.I. – winner of the 2012 Faces of Diversity American Dream Award.
      http://youtu.be/C_vhnG10AfU
    • McDonald’s Hamburger University
      At McDonald’s, our training mission is to be the best talent developer of people with the most committed individuals to Quality, Service, Cleanliness & Value. That was true in 1961 and is still true today. Learn about Hamburger University, one of the world’s first corporate universities.
      http://youtu.be/p0iEM6UT9Vc

  • Quiz

    Restaurant Management Online Course

    Progress:

    1. Which of the following is NOT a casual dining establishment?

    2. This type of dining caters to people who like to eat out, but are not interested in a formal atmosphere or high prices. They enjoy a relaxed environment and mid-range prices.

    3. Foodservice-specific bachelor's degrees offer students

    4. Slips, trips, and falls can best be avoided when spills are cleaned

    5. The term restaurant is derived from the French word "restaurer" which means to

    6. The current Federal Minimum Wage is

    7. Servers in restaurants may get paid ____________ per hour because tips are considered part of their wages.

    8. Restaurant trends are influenced by

    9. Which employment law states that only U.S. citizens and people who are authorized to work in the United States may be legally hired?

    10. Who determines the hourly minimum wage that employers can pay employees?

    11. Teen workers may be more susceptible to work injuries because of

    12. The most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States and the most common cause of foodborne deaths is:

    13. According to The food timeline website, what year was the first restaurant started?http://foodtimeline.org/restaurants.html#restaurants

    14. This type of restaurant often tries to recreate another place or time. Customers enjoy seeing sports memorabilia or an indoor waterfall and are moderately priced.

    15. Also known as fast food, this type of dining makes up the largest section of the foodservice industry. It has limited menus, low prices, and speedy service. Food is prepared using exact standards and factory-like production.

    16. In management opportunities, who is the person that orders the ingredients for the menu items and makes sure they are prepared correctly?

    17. In Gordon Ramsey’s Restaurant Tips video, what does he say is the number one tip for running a restaurant?

    18. The first thing a student still in high school interested in the foodservice industry should do is?

    19. Kim is tripling her world famous chocolate cake recipe. If the recipe originally calls for 12 ounces of dark chocolate to be mixed in, how many pounds of dark chocolate should be added to the new tripled batch?

    20. Which law make it illegal to put a person with a disability in a lower-paying job only because of the disability?

    21. Young people age 14 and under can work at which jobs?

    22. What is the leading cause of death among teen workers in retail/service jobs?

    23. What is the first step in developing a HACCP plan?

    24. Day managers opening the restaurant might

    25. How many inches from the floor should food be stored?

    26. The three elements that make up most of an operation's cost are

    27. Direct labor costs are

    28. All foodservice employees, especially those who talk to customers, must possess the following qualities:

    29. Catering services are NOT part of the foodservice industry.

    30. The ____________ represents the foodservice operation, sells the menu, serves menu items skillfully, and receives the correct payment from the customer.

    31. The purpose of this form is to document that each new employee (both citizen and noncitizen) hired after November 6, 1986, is authorized to work in the United States.

    32. Which law makes it illegal to put a person with a disability in a lower-paying job only because of the disability?

    33. Employees should have which of the following work ethics?

    34. Whenever a pot or pan is on a stove, the worker should assume that it is

    35. Indirect labor costs may include health insurance, taxes, and vacations.

    36. When receiving food products, they must be carefully inspected for damage and potential problems such as

    37. Food stored in the refrigerator should be labeled and dated.

    38. Food cost percentage is the ratio of the cost of food served to the

    39. Every ____ minutes, a U.S. teen gets hurt on the job.

    40. Cafes were places where educated people went to share ideas and new discoveries.

    41. What gives shoppers convenient access to a variety of quick meals, snacks, and beverages at malls and shopping centers?

    42. The foodservice industry is about

    43. Unwelcome advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of sexual nature is

    44. Math skills such as calculating numbers: adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing, are needed in the food service industry for

    45. Restaurant Management is in the

    46. The Restaurant Management course will provide students insight into the operation of a well-run ____________.

    47. CPE stands for Continuing Professional Education.

    48. CTE stands for

    49. There are ____________ Career Clusters.

    50. Career and Technical Education equips students with:

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