Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Online Course

  • Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Online Course Introduction

    The hospitality and tourism industry encompasses: lodging, travel, tourism, recreation, amusements, attractions, resorts, restaurants, food and beverage service. The hospitality and tourism industry maintains the largest national employment base in the private sector. Students use knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations as well as other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Principles of Hospitality and Tourism is one of 12 courses in the Human Services career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and eight modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course, you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to lesson Introductory Lesson: Principles of Hospitality and Tourism for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-principles-of-hospitality-and-tourism/

  • I. Course Introduction/Historical Overview

    TEKS Addressed:

    (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:

    • (A) demonstrate a proactive understanding of self-responsibility and self-management
    • (B) explain the characteristics of personal values and principles
    • (C) display positive attitudes and good work habits
    • (D) develop strategies for achieving accuracy and organizational skills

    (4) The student develops principles in time management, decision-making, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:

    • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
    • (B) analyze the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities
    • (C) analyze the various steps in the decision-making process
    • (D) work independently

    Module Content

    Course Introduction/Historical Overview is the first unit of study in the Principles of Hospitality and Tourism course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Personal success
    • B. Personal management


    Module I Handouts

    Refer to lesson The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family for additional resources and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-balancing-act-managing-a-career-and-family-2/

    A. Personal success

    Understanding self-responsibility and self-management

    The definition of hospitality is an act of welcoming strangers and guests. The hospitality and tourism industry is an entire entity built around this guiding principle. The necessary skills of self-management and self-responsibility are paramount in employees within this industry in keeping with this guiding principle.

    Self-management refers to a person’s ability to manage themselves in their work role toward achieving the goals or outcomes of the organization.

    Self-responsibility has the added characteristics of initiative and motivation. Both combine to achieve an important element of what businesses and organizations within hospitality and tourism are looking for in an employee.

    Areas within the work environment needing self-responsibility and self-management are seen in the:

    • financial accounting of funds and items
    • following proper hygiene and sanitation policies
    • ensuring good customer service
    • inventory and supplies
    • advance planning for events
    • legal compliance

    An employee with high self-responsibility not only meets the requirements of the company, but assesses and evaluates their own performance and adjusts accordingly.

    This includes:

    • eliciting feedback from supervisors when necessary
    • seeking out opportunities to grow in their skills
    • a willingness to contribute toward a positive experience by all
    • whether they are fellow employees, clients and guests

    Personal values and principles

    Personal values and principles play a significant role in an individual’s selection of:

    • a career
    • work ethic on the job
    • perceived job satisfaction

    In the process of applying our personal values, people consciously and unconsciously make subjective judgments about a wide array of things in life.

    Through values, we determine whether something is desirable or undesirable.
    Principles are the action of values, related to basic truths and a standard to guide by.
    The hospitality industry is all about treating customers and clients like guests. With this in mind, a guiding principle for this field would be one of exemplary customer service.

    Positive attitudes and good work habits
    People enjoy positive people. Working with or interacting with a positive person makes anything more enjoyable. In an industry dependent upon customers and tourists, having a positive attitude on the job is paramount.
    Positive attitudes promote good work habits.

    They can improve relations with:

    • fellow employees
    • promote teamwork
    • help in decision-making
    • overcoming problems

    It lessens stress on the job:

    • reducing sick days
    • increasing productivity
    • can ultimately help an employee with advancement and career success

    The hospitality area is a labor intensive industry. A positive attitude usually means a good work ethic.

    A person can ask the following questions to determine their own work ethic:

    • Do you value your job?
    • Do you take pride in how well you perform your job?
    • Do you look for ways to be more efficient?
    • Do you avoid taking the easy way out?
    • Do you sometimes work later if necessary?

    Answering yes to these questions usually means an employee has a good work ethic.

    In addition, businesses need their employees to:

    • work professionally
    • keep their personal lives private
    • conserve resources
    • not steal

    Achieving accuracy and organizational skills

    Work productivity is affected negatively by disorganization. Developing good organizational skills on the job is important for career success and maintaining your sanity at work. Although positions within the hospitality and tourism industry are varied, one aspect they have in common are the need for good organizational skills.

    Most jobs have more responsibilities than time to do them. Developing good work habits and organizing your day ensures productivity and a feeling of accomplishment.

    Areas at work that can benefit from organization are:

    • planning ahead
    • prioritizing
    • delegating
    • keeping the work environment free of clutter

    B. Personal management

    Managing time and energy effectively

    The largest organizations within the hospitality industry are within the:

    • food
    • beverage
    • lodging areas

    To make sure the business runs smoothly, general managers are in charge of an entire operation, such as a resort hotel. Under the general manager are directors and supervisors of different divisions and responsibilities that go along with each specific area.

    This can include:

    • rooms
    • food and beverage
    • sales and marketing
    • accounting
    • human resources

    Whatever level of management, one of the primary skills needed is the ability to delegate. A good manager knows how to delegate responsibility for the specific work that is needed in their area. Efficient managers see what needs to be done, whether it’s a small job or a large one, and assigns the right people to complete the work economically to the standards the company has set.

    Balancing career, family and leisure activities
    Companies want happy employees, and the hospitality industry in no different. Organizations realize that to keep their business running as productively as possible, they must focus on retention and turnover.
    Employee retention occurs when a company makes an effort to keep good employees.
    Turnover occurs when a worker resigns and the business must hire another to take their place, which can be very expensive for businesses. The human resources department or division within organizations plays an important role in keeping employee satisfaction high.

    QWL is a concept which stands for Quality of Work Life. It is an idea that addresses how employees feel about their work environment and the direct impact it can have in their individual and family life.

    QWL programs within organizations address issues such as:

    • stress management
    • financial planning
    • health and wellness
    • other issues related to balancing work and family

    These types of programs are especially important within an industry which works while others are on vacation. The work is not typically nine to five, Monday through Friday, but includes evenings, weekends, twenty-four hours a day. Human Resource’s dedication to providing QWL programs for its employees helps balance work, family and leisure time.

    Working independently

    In the fast-paced world of hospitality and tourism, companies need to rely on their employees to be self-directed. Even if a person is a part of a team, they must have some sense of managing oneself on the job.

    Skills an employee must have to work independently are:

    • good organizational abilities
    • multitasking
    • discipline
    • good communication
    • adaptability
    • flexibility

    Multitasking is the ability to carry out two or more things at the same time by one person. In the world of hospitality this could be seen in a waiter responsible for several tables at one time perhaps due to a shortage of wait staff.
    An employee must also show discipline and self-control in busy, stressful situations especially when dealing directly with customers. In addition, they must have the ability to monitor what is needed at the moment, and the flexibility to adapt their work performance accordingly.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • Personal Activities Calendar
    • Rubric for Participation in the Balancing Act Activity
    • The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family Notes
    • The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family Notes (Key)
    • The Balancing Act Activity
    • Way To Go Certificate

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Recognize students for their positive work habits by presenting them with certificates of excellence, achievement, participation, teamwork, and leadership skills. These can be added to a portfolio of all their achievements.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Module I: Course Introduction/Historical Overview Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The definition of hospitality is to:

    • a. welcome strangers and guests
    • b. provide medicinal and medical benefits
    • c. provide a good experience with food
    • d. promote unkindness and be unfriendly

    2. QWL programs help employees:

    • a. to learn the decision-making process
    • b. to balance work, family and leisure activities
    • c. to meet customer needs
    • d. to earn pay advances

    3. Judging whether something is desirable or undesirable is a part of our personal _______ system.

    • a. health
    • b. financial
    • c. career
    • d. value

    4. The head of a hospitality organization such as a resort, would most likely be:

    • a. the wait staff supervisor
    • b. the head chef
    • c. the general manager
    • d. the food and beverage director

    5. Multitasking is the ability to carry out two or more things at the same time by one person.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    6. Skills an employee must have to work independently are:

    • a. good organizational abilities and being able to multitask
    • b. being disciplined and flexible
    • c. have good communication and be able to adapt
    • d. all of the above

  • II. Leadership Development

    TEKS Addressed:

    (7) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop team-building skills
    • (B) develop decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (C) conduct and participate in meetings to accomplish tasks
    • (D) determine leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant working atmosphere
    • (E) participate in community service activities

    (5) The student researches, analyzes, and explores lifestyle and career goals. The student is expected to:

    • (C) examine related community service opportunities

    Refer to lesson Service Learning With a Smile: Hospitality and Tourism for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-hospitality-and-tourism/

    Module Content

    Leadership is the second unit of study in the Principles of Hospitality and Tourism course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Leadership
    • B. Citizenship
    • C. Teamwork
    • D. Community services

    Module II Handouts

    A. Leadership
    The definition of leadership is a person who exemplifies qualities needed to guide or direct people to perform certain tasks.

    In the hospitality industry, most managers and supervisors are the leaders of teams, whether these are in restaurant venues, resort hotels, or entertainment arenas just to name a few.

    Regular staff meetings are used to:

    • ensure all are on the same page
    • set goals
    • deliver new information
    • respond to feedback

    To make sure departments are productive and efficient, regular staff meetings are required. It is important for someone who aspires to a management position to know how to effectively conduct and participate in business meetings.

    View eHow video:

    Leadership and teamwork qualities in a pleasant work environment
    In the hospitality industry, the leader of most organizations is the general manager. Under this position are directors who oversee departments run by managers and supervisors.

    Even within a leadership position, an employee will be a part of the management team running the company. Good leadership qualities and being a good team member are necessary.

    Managers:

    • set goals for their department
    • oversee customer satisfaction
    • set budgets and schedules
    • monitor purchasing, receiving and inventories
    • hire and train employees
    • monitor and evaluate their staff

    Managers that are adept in their departments will often be called upon to extend those responsibilities to additional departments; therefore, gathering experience that could help with advancement opportunities.

    To be both an effective leader and team member within an organization requires:

    • good character
    • honesty
    • integrity
    • a sense of fairness
    • commitment to the organizational goals
    • communication and being responsive
    • confidence in both himself/herself and their team
    • dedication to excellence

    B. Citizenship
    Citizenship are the qualities that a person is expected to have as a responsible member of a team.

    Qualities may include:

    • positive attitude
    • friendly
    • self-motivated
    • cooperative
    • adaptable
    • commitment
    • positive work habits

    Your role as a citizen requires that you be informed about current issues and vote.

    C. Teamwork
    Developing team-building, decision-making and problem-solving skills
    There are unlimited opportunities for advancement and promotion for good employees within the hospitality industry.

    Critical characteristics desired in workers that carry over into management positions are:

    • team-building qualities
    • good decision-making
    • problem-solving skills

    Within this industry, these qualities can be seen in areas such as:

    • financial management
    • customer service
    • communication
    • training
    • inventory procedures

    Even at a beginning level of employment, a hospitality worker can:

    • balance their register
    • keep accurate records of sales and refunds
    • show patience and understanding when dealing with difficult customers
    • help train and supervise junior staff
    • ensure timely delivery of meals and beverages
    • order and manage supplies
    • communicate appropriately with management

    D. Community services
    Community Service helps young people build skills for family, career, and community roles; provides youth-centered learning experiences.

    It encourages young people to develop the positive character traits of:

    • trustworthiness
    • respect
    • responsibility
    • fairness
    • caring
    • citizenship

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module II Handouts

    • Compare and Contrast SL Articles
    • How People Communicate With Each Other
    • Read About Service Learning Leaders
    • Rubric for Service Learning Experience
    • Service Learning in Action
    • Service Learning KWL Chart
    • Service Learning Log2
    • Service Learning Quotes
    • The Perfect Service Learning
    • Venn Diagram – Compare and Contrast Neighborhood vs. School Community

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Begin discussion with your students on the importance of employability skills, attitudes, and work ethics.
    • Emphasize team building skills by allowing students to work in groups, sub-groups of 2 to 4, and partners. Students should learn to work with other people other than their friends so allow them to choose their team by randomly picking numbers or names from a “hat.”
    • Student involvement with community service opportunities should come through the FCCLA student organization. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) is a non-profit student organization within the Hospitality and Tourism, Human Services, Education and Training pathways of Career and Technical Education. Here, students have the opportunity to learn leadership and team building skills by participating in community involvement and competing at regional and state STAR events.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Modules II: Leadership Development Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The definition of leadership is a person who exemplifies qualities needed to guide or ______ people to perform certain tasks.

    • a. control
    • b. force
    • c. direct
    • d. manipulate

    2. Regular staff meetings are used to:

    • a. socialize
    • b. handout paychecks
    • c. criticize customers
    • d. ensure all are on the same page

    3. A document used to run an effective meeting is called a(an):

    • a. meeting authorization
    • b. agenda
    • c. accounting document
    • d. meeting minutes

    4. FCCLA stands for:

    • a. Future and Caring Communities, Leadership Association
    • b. Friends, Community, Careers Leadership Association
    • c. Families of Career Communities and Labor Agency
    • d. Family, Career and Community Leaders of America

    5. Qualities desirable in an effective leader include:

    • a. honesty and integrity
    • b. tardiness and incompetence
    • c. good looks and polish
    • d. being unreliable

    6. Critical characteristics desired in workers that carry over into management positions are:

    • a. team-building qualities
    • b. good decision-making
    • c. problem-solving skills
    • d. all of the above

  • III. Communication Skills

    TEKS Addressed:

    (1) The student applies academic skills for the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) write effectively using standard English and correct grammar
    • (B) comprehend a variety of texts
    • (C) create and proofread appropriate professional documents

    (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication to provide a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop and analyze formal and informal presentations
    • (B) practice customer service skills

    (5) The student researches, analyzes, and explores lifestyle and career goals. The student is expected to:

    • (D) create a career portfolio

    (7) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:

    • (B) develop decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (C) conduct and participate in meetings to accomplish tasks
    • (D) determine leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant working atmosphere

    (10) The student demonstrates research skills applicable to the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (B) use travel information to design a customized product for travelers

    Module Content

    A. Academic skills
    B. Verbal communication
    C. Nonverbal communication
    D. Leadership

    Refer to lesson Building Teamwork: Food Truck Design Project to learn more about communication skills.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/building-teamwork-food-truck-design-project/

    Refer to lesson 21st Century Employability Skills – Principles of Hospitality and Tourism for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/21st-century-employability-skills-principles-of-hospitality-and-tourism/

    Module III Handouts

    A. Academic skills
    Writing effectively, comprehending a variety of texts, creating professional documents related to the hospitality and tourism industry

    Today’s business world requires a different set of writing skills than previous generations.

    Advancements in technology have changed much of the way we communicate and transmit information from one party to another. However, all employees at every level should have good basic verbal and writing skills that include spelling and grammar. Beyond this, today’s corporate climates, including hospitality and tourism organizations, require their employees to be able to communicate effectively via the worldwide web.

    Since the hospitality and tourism field is global, much business is conducted through computer websites. A person living in Indiana can log onto a hotel’s website in Paris, make reservations and request a room suitable for someone in a wheelchair. On the receiving end, employees need to know how to access necessary information and communicate effectively in return through emails.

    Designing customized travel information for travelers
    A big part of the hospitality industry is in marketing.

    Technology has made a drastic change in the travel industry, and nowhere is it seen more prevalent than in travel packages. Although travel agents have put travel packages together for tourists for years, now individuals can use the internet to customize their travel plans often without the aid of a travel expert.

    Knowing this, those whose lives and businesses depend upon tourist dollars, network and combine what they have to offer with others into appealing travel packages. It may be as simple as a Bed and Breakfast in Alaska networking with fly fishing experts to offer tourist lessons, to all-inclusive vacations complete with air, lodging, food and activities combined.

    Students should realize that travel packages are sets of individual products that are combined under one price, and can be purchased by the traveler in one transaction.

    Effective writing skills are a must to make:

    • flyers
    • brochures
    • business cards
    • signage
    • booklets
    • reports

    Management positions need to be able to design:

    • presentations
    • proposals
    • year-end reports
    • financial documents
    • employee evaluations

    B. Verbal communication
    Verbal means using words.

    Verbal communication includes:

    • tone of voice
    • the way you speak
    • proper grammar
    • no profanity

    Language is the first aspect of verbal communication. In some hospitality businesses, a second language is needed as many hospitality companies are international. Knowing a second language can be a real benefit and an opportunity to work and advance in a foreign country.

    Word choice is the second aspect of verbal communication and is important both in spoken and written language. They should always convey professionalism and politeness.

    Creating a career portfolio

    Career portfolios are created by students to organize and document their:

    • education
    • work experience
    • work samples
    • skills toward the profession they desire

    There are several formats that can be used for designing career portfolios.

    The basic parts include:

    • a letter of introduction
    • a resume
    • samples of work
    • achievements
    • letters of recommendation
    • high school transcript
    • personal interests

    Today, many organizations require students to submit their career portfolio online, and this has brought about the popularity of electronic portfolios, or e-portfolio.

    It is a collection of electronic evidence through inputted:

    • text
    • electronic files
    • images
    • multimedia files
    • blog entries
    • hyperlinks

    View YouTube™ video detailing e-portfolios:

    C. Nonverbal communication
    Nonverbal means without words.

    The message you present with your body language that includes:

    • facial expression
    • hand gestures
    • posture
    • eye contact
    • tone of voice

    As an employee in the hospitality industry, make sure your nonverbal actions communicate warmth and concern for your customers.

    D. Leadership

    Leadership is the ability to influence others and to inspire excellence. It is a critical skill for people who want to start their own business or get promoted to upper management jobs.

    People often develop leadership skills by volunteering to lead projects at work. Encourage your students to volunteer to lead a charity event, fundraiser, or an officer in a CTSO. Student career and technical organizations provide many opportunities for professional and leadership development.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module III Handouts

    • 21st Century Employability Skills Notes
    • 21st Century Employability Skills Notes (Key)
    • Basic Information for Writing a Résumé (half sheet)
    • Career Portfolio Sections
    • Career Portfolio Sections (Key)
    • Certificate of Excellence
    • Food Truck Design Plan
    • Food Truck Project Rubric
    • Food Truck Timeline
    • Food Truck Timeline (Key)
    • Hospitality and Tourism – Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems
    • KWL – Portfolios
    • My Employability Skills Checklist
    • Rubric for Career Portfolio
    • Sample Résumé Template
    • Service Learning Log

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas:

    • Assign the Building Teamwork: Food Truck Design Project lesson to the students so they may interact as a team.
      View PBS video:
    • Encourage students to run for an office in FCCLA to practice their leadership skills.
    • Allow students to create an all inclusive travel package to a destination of their choice.

    References and Resources:

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Module III: Communication Skills Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A necessary communication skill for the workplace in today’s technologically driven world is:

    • a. notetaking
    • b. mail
    • c. emails
    • d. staff meetings

    2. Good spelling and grammar are necessary skills for anyone producing:

    • a. phone calls
    • b. post-it note messages
    • c. business flyers and brochures
    • d. texts to multiple recipients

    3. Effective writing skills are a must to make:

    • a. flyers and brochures
    • b. business cards and signs
    • c. booklets and reports
    • d. all of the above

    4. A collection of electronic evidence such as a resume, letter of introduction, and transcripts using multimedia, texts, and images would be called (a)an:

    • a. career portfolio
    • b. leadership portfolio
    • c. development notebook
    • d. e-portfolio

    5. A set of individual travel products, such as airfare, hotel, car rental, that are combined under one price is called a:

    • a. travel package
    • b. combined package
    • c. special deal
    • d. set rate bundle

    6. Nonverbal communication means without:

    • a. eye contact
    • b. words
    • c. hand gestures
    • d. facial expression

  • IV. Business of Hospitality and Tourism

    TEKS Addressed:

    (9) The student explores and explains the roles within each department of the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) examine the duties and responsibilities required within operational departments
    • (B) research the job qualifications for various positions to facilitate selection of career choices

    (10) The student demonstrates research skills applicable to the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop technical vocabulary to enhance customer service
    • (C) examine elements of a dining experience expected to satisfy guests at varied facilities such as a boardwalk vendor, cruise ship, chain restaurant, and five-star dining facility
    • (D) identify local and regional tourism issues

    (11) The student understands the importance of customer service. The student is expected to:

    • (C) plan a cost effective trip or itinerary to meet customer needs
    • (D) examine different types of food service

    (1) The student applies academic skills for the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (D) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentages and reasonable estimations
    • (E) infer how scientific principles are used in the hospitality and tourism industry

    Refer to lesson What is a Food Venue for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-is-a-food-venue/

    Module Content

    A. Industry pathways
    B. Numerical concepts
    C. Scientific principles
    D. Decision making
    E. Department roles
    F. Research skills

    Module IV Handouts

    A. Industry pathways
    Introduce the Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster and AchieveTexas Programs of Study Models.

    This cluster includes four different career pathways:

    • restaurants and food and beverage service
    • lodging
    • travel and tourism
    • recreation, amusements, and attractions

    Begin by explaining each cluster and the roles within each department.

    Restaurants and Food and Beverage Service
    A food and beverage business prepares, packages, serves, sells, or provides food for people to eat.

    Types of Food Service Businesses

    • Commercial
      • Quick Service
        • Fast food restaurants
        • Cafeterias
        • Buffets
        • Carryout
      • Full Service
        • Fine dining
        • Casual
          • Single item
          • Ethnic
          • Family
      • Catering
        • On-premises
        • Off-premises
      • Hotel and Club
    • Institutional
      • School
      • Health Care
      • Business and Industry
      • Institutional Food Contractors
    • Foodservice Within a Consumer Business
      • Reacreation
      • Retail
      • Transportation
        • On the transportation
        • In the station

    Lodging
    The lodging industry consists of all businesses that provide overnight accommodations. Each lodging business is unique, yet each one has to perform the same functions.

    Functions in a Lodging Businesses:

    • Front Office
    • Housekeeping
    • Purchasing and Receiving
    • Management
    • Marketing and Sales
    • Human Resources
    • Accounting
    • Security
    • Safety and Emergency Procedure
    • Engineering

    Travel and Tourism
    The travel industry consists of businesses that physically move people from one place to another. The tourism industry consists of businesses that organize and promote travel and vacations.

    Recreations, Amusements, and Attractions
    The recreation industry consists of businesses that provide activities for rest, relaxation, and employment.

    B. Numerical concepts
    The business world runs on numbers, more specifically, on profits. A keen sense of arithmetic and mathematics is necessary to ensure a business grows and prospers.

    Mathematical skills also are needed for use of technology; cash registers, calculators and computers are all tools used on a regular basis within the hospitality industry.

    For more details on the numerical concepts, see Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems written specifically for this course.

    C. Scientific principles
    Many scientific advancements have been made which impacted the foodservice and hospitality industries.

    • Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), developed a process called pasteurization which made milk safer to drink by heating it to a certain temperature to destroy harmful bacteria.
    • Nicolas Appert (1749-1841), discovered a way to can food to keep it fresh and safe to eat. He is known as the father of canning.
    • Nurse Florence Nightingale (1820-1910), argued that health was dependent on appropriate diet, surroundings, activity, and hygiene.

    Can you think of other scientists that have impacted the hospitality industry?

    D. Decision making

    Decision making and problem solving are ongoing processes of:

    • evaluating situations or problems
    • considering alternatives
    • making choices
    • following up with necessary actions

    Introduce your students to The FCCLA Planning Process for Individual and Team Action.
    This is a decision-making tool that supports the organization’s overall philosophy about youth-centered leadership and personal growth. It can be used to determine group action in a chapter or class or to plan individual projects.

    Planning Process:

    • Identify Concerns
      • brainstorm to generate ideas
      • evaluate your list and narrow it down
    • Set A Goal
      • clear mental picture
      • goal is achieved and evaluated
      • consider resources available
    • Form A Plan
      • decide what needs to be done
      • figure out who, what, where, when, and how
      • list other available resources
      • make a workable timetable
      • list possible barriers
      • decide way to recognize accomplishments
    • Act
      • carry out group or individual plan
      • use family and community members when needed
    • Follow Up
      • determine if goal was met
      • list improvements
      • share and publicize efforts
      • recognize members and thank people

    E. Department Roles

    Restaurants and Food and Beverage

    Restaurants are divided into two areas:

    • the front-of-the-house
    • the back-of-the-house

    Each area has its own responsibilities but must work closely together for the restaurant to succeed.

    Restaurant Organization

    • General Manager
      • Restaurant Manager
      • Assistant Manager
        • Servers
        • Bussers
        • Host or Hostess
        • Cashiers
      • Executive Chef
        • Sous Chef
        • Chefs or Cooks
        • Steward
        • Dishwashers

    Lodging

    The main business of a lodging property is selling sleeping rooms. This is the major source of income for the property.

    The front office handles everything related to selling sleeping rooms and interacting with guests.

    • Front Office Manager
      • Reservations Department (Supervisor or Manager)
        • Reservations
        • Sales Agents
      • Front Desk Department (Supervisor or Manager)
        • Front Desk Agents
        • Night Auditors
      • Uniformed Services Department (Bell Captain)
        • Door Attendants
        • Bell Attendants
        • Parking and Transportation Staff
        • Concierges
      • Telecommunications Department (Supervisor or Manager)
        • Operators

    Housekeeping is the second major department. It is responsible for keeping the hotel clean. The housekeeping department has the largest staff in the hotel.

    Organization of a Housekeeping Division

    • Housekeeping (Executive Housekeeper)
      • Guest Rooms (Assistant Housekeeper)
        • Inspectors
        • Room Attendants
      • Public Areas (House Staff Supervisor)
        • House Attendants
      • Laundry (Laundry Supervisor)
        • Laundry Attendants
        • Seamsters
      • Contract Services (Contract Services Manager)

    Security is critical for all hospitality businesses. Hospitality businesses are attractive targets for criminals.

    Organization of the Security Division

    • Director of Security
    • Assistant Director of Security
      • Supervisor, Morning Shift
        • Security Officers
      • Supervisor, Afternoon Shift
        • Security Officers
      • Supervisor, Evening Shift
        • Security Officers

    The engineering department is responsible for the physical facilities of the hotel. The tasks of the engineering department include maintenance, repairs, deep cleaning, and groundskeeping.

    Engineering staff

    • Chief Engineer
      • Skilled Technicians
      • Maintenance Staff

    Travel and Tourism and Recreation, Amusements, and Attractions

    Hospitality businesses have to be organized and run efficiently. They have activities that directly bring in revenue, and other activities that support the activities that bring in revenue.

    Generic Organization Chart

    • General Manager (Responsible for whole company)
      • Manager Department A (Responsible for all Department A tasks)
        • Worker A-1 (Responsible for all A-1 tasks)
        • Worker A-2 (Responsible for all A-2 tasks)
        • Worker A-3 (Responsible for all A-3 tasks)
      • Manager Department B (Responsible for all Department B tasks)
        • Worker B-1 (Responsible for all B-1 tasks)
        • Worker B-2 (Responsible for all B-2 tasks)
        • Worker B-3 (Responsible for all B-3 tasks)
      • Manager Department C (Responsible for all Department B tasks)
        • Worker C-1 (Responsible for all C-1 tasks)
        • Worker C-2 (Responsible for all C-2 tasks)
        • Worker C-3 (Responsible for all C-3 tasks)

    Is management in your career path?

    F. Research Skills

    There are several components to assigning students a research paper. Be sure to follow your district guidelines when using the internet with your students.

    Remind students to:

    • use reliable sources
    • cite sources (give credit where credit is due)
    • summarize articles (do not cut and paste)
    • use appropriate videos

    Ask your school library media specialist if your school subscribes to online databases such as those listed below.

    Online Databases:

    • Discovery School Streaming
    • EBCO
    • Encyclopedia Britannica
    • Gale INFOTRAC
    • World Book Encyclopedia

    Students will be able to access information from their home through the Internet using pass codes available from their school.

    If your school does not have online databases available, encourage students to visit the public library where EBSCOhost is available for free.

    These online databases are used at the college level so your students will be prepared with the skills needed.

    For career searches use:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module IV Handouts

    • Food Venues PowerPoint™ Project and Speech
    • Food Venues PowerPoint™ Project Score Sheet
    • My Food Venues
    • Read and Reflect

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas:

    • Have students list all of the food service establishments in your community. They may be surprised at how many places there are to eat in their city/town.
    • Have students list all of the hotels in their community. Again, they may be surprised at the number.
    • Plan a field trip to a restaurant or hotel and ask for a tour of the facilities.

    References and Resources:

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Module IV: Business of Hospitality and Tourism Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The Hospitality and Tourism Cluster includes _______ career pathways.

    • a. two
    • b. three
    • c. four
    • d. five

    2. A type of Quick Service business is:

    • a. fast food restaurant
    • b. school daycare
    • c. catering
    • d. casual dining

    3. The lodging industry consists of all businesses that provide food and beverage service.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    4. The travel industry consists of businesses that physically move people from one place to another.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. The tourism industry consists of businesses that organize and promote travel and vacations.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    6. Mathematical skills are needed in hospitality for:

    • a. cash registers
    • b. calculators
    • c. computers
    • d. all of the above

    7. The last step in the FCCLA Planning Process is:

    • a. Set a goal
    • b. Follow up
    • c. Act
    • d. Form a plan

    8. Restaurants are divided into two areas:

    • a. kitchen and dining
    • b. front-of-the-house
    • c. back-of-the-house
    • d. b. and c.

  • V. Regulations and Risks

    TEKS Addressed:

    (8) The student explains how employees, guests, and property are protected to minimize losses or liabilities in the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) determine job safety and security
    • (B) implement the basics of sanitation
    • (C) understand and demonstrate procedures for cleaning, sanitizing, and storing equipment and tools
    • (D) determine how environmental issues such as recycling and saving energy affect the hospitality and tourism industry

    (1) The student applies academic skills for the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (E) infer how scientific principles are used in the hospitality and tourism industry

    Refer to lesson Safety and Sanitation Guidelines – Principles of Hospitality and Tourism for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-principles-of-hospitality-and-tourism/

    Module Content

    A. Safety
    B. Sanitation
    C. Environment

    Module V a Handouts
    Module V b Handouts

    A. Safety
    Job Safety and Security
    On any given day in the world, there are millions of people within the hospitality and tourism industry that are there either as employees or customers. Any business within this industry that does not give attention to risk management or crisis management will most likely not stay in business for long.

    Risks can come from several areas:

    • disasters (natural or man made)
    • fire
    • food poisoning
    • civil or political unrest
    • organized crime
    • data privacy

    Most large organizations have risk managers on staff; but, for smaller operations this comes in the form of a crisis management plan. Both employer and employees should be knowledgeable of this plan. Risk management has evolved over the past years to a proactive process.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) requires employers to make the workplace free of hazards that might cause injury or death to employees.

    Employers are required to:

    • provide a safe workplace
    • know and follow all OSH Act standards and requirements related to their businesses
    • post the OHSA poster where employees can easily see it
    • inform employees of potential health and safety hazards
    • provide health and safety training
    • make sure that employees have and use appropriate protective and safety equipment
    • develop an emergency action plan
    • keep OSHA-required records of job-related injuries and illnesses
    • within 8 hours, report any job-related accident that results in the death of one or more employees or in the hospitalization of three or more employees
    • cooperate with OSHA staff during inspections
    • not discriminate against any employee who reports health or safety hazards
    • penalties can be imposed on employers who violate OSH Act requirements

    Employees are expected to:

    • read the OSHA poster
    • follow all employer health and safety rules
    • report hazardous conditions to supervisor
    • seek help immediately for any job-related illness or injury
    • report any job-related illness or injury to supervisor
    • cooperate with OSHA staff during inspections

    B. Sanitation
    Consists of the actions taken to prevent and control disease.

    Sanitation includes the processes of:

    • cleaning – the physical removal of dirt food from surfaces
    • sanitizing – the treatment of a clean surface with chemicals or heat to reduce the number of pathogens

    Pathogens include:

    • bacteria
    • viruses
    • fungi
    • parasites

    Bacteria and viruses on equipment can be killed by cleaning them with a sanitizing solution such as:

    • bleach
    • iodine
    • quaternary ammonium compounds (quats)

    Food safety and sanitation, along with sanitation of the facility, are all key factors in maintaining a healthful environment. A formal HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) System must be established.

    The written HACCP plan must:

    • detail hazards
    • identify the CCP’s critical limits
    • specify CCP monitoring and methods of record keeping
    • outline a strategy for implementing the plan

    C. Environment

    The quality of the environment has two major impacts on the hospitality industry:

    • health
    • recreation

    Health

    Hospitality businesses need

    • clean, safe air
    • water
    • food that is not contaminated by pesticides or other toxic chemicals

    Recreation

    Hospitality businesses depend on:

    • the beauty and safety of natural areas

    The Environmental Protection Agency was established in 1970 to make and enforce environmental regulations.
    They are mandated to protect human health and safeguard the environment.

    Additional EPA Laws include:

    • clean air
    • clean water
    • safe drinking water
    • cleaning up toxic wastes
    • protecting endangered species
    • protection from pesticides and other toxic substances
    • food quality protection
    • occupational safety

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module V a Handouts
    Module V b Handouts

    • All About OSHA
    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • Job Safety and Health – It’s the Law! Poster
    • OSHA at a Glance
    • Preventing Death, Injuries, and Illnesses of Young Workers
    • Rubric for Safety Sign Challenge
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines Notes
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines Notes (Key)
    • Safety Sign Award

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Print a copy of the OSHA Poster for students to read and review. Place it in a prominent place in your classroom for reference.
    • Distribute a copy of the Workers’ Rights for students to read and review. Discuss incidents that may occur while on the job.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    • EPA – United States Environmental Protection Agency
      Our mission is to protect human health and the environment.
      http://www.epa.gov/
    • OSHA – Occupational Safety and Health Administration
      To assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.
      http://www.osha.gov/

    Module V: Regulations and Risk Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. All of these areas represent the most risk, EXCEPT:

    • a. food poisoning
    • b. organized crime
    • c. alien invasion
    • d. political unrest

    2. Risk management has evolved over the past years to a:

    • a. reactive process
    • b. studied phenomena
    • c. proactive process
    • d. process delegated to guests

    3. OSH Act is an acronym for:

    • a. Occupational Safety and Hazard Act
    • b. Oxygen Safety and Hazard Act
    • c. Occupational Sanitation and Home Act
    • d. Occupational Safety and Health Act

    4. Employees are expected to do the following EXCEPT:

    • a. copy the OSHA poster
    • b. follow all employer health and safety rules
    • c. report hazardous conditions to supervisor
    • d. seek help immediately for any job-related illness or injury

    5. SANITATION of kitchen equipment means to:

    • a. wash in soapy water and rinse
    • b. reduce the number of microorganisms
    • c. use a dishwasher and detergent agent
    • d. rinse well in extremely hot water

    6. EPA is an acronym for:

    • a. Environmental Protection Agency
    • b. Environmental Program Act
    • c. Earth Protection Act
    • d. Environmental Protection Agriculture

  • VI. Customer Service

    TEKS Addressed:

    (10) The student demonstrates research skills applicable to the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop technical vocabulary to enhance customer service
    • (B) use travel information to design a customized product for travelers
    • (C) examine elements of a dining experience expected to satisfy guests at varied facilities such as a boardwalk vendor, cruise ship, chain restaurant, and five-star dining facility
    • (D) identify local and regional tourism issues

    (11) The student understands the importance of customer service. The student is expected to:

    • (A) determine ways to provide quality customer service
    • (B) analyze how guests are affected by employee attitude, appearance, and actions
    • (C) plan a cost effective trip or itinerary to meet customer needs
    • (D) examine different types of food service

    (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication to provide a positive experience for guests and employees. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop and analyze formal and informal presentations; and
    • (B) practice customer service skills

    (7) The student demonstrates leadership, citizenship, and teamwork skills required for success. The student is expected to:

    • (D) determine leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant working atmosphere

    Module Content

    A. Communication
    B. Customer product
    C. Customer service
    D. Dining experience

    Module VI Handouts

    A. Communication
    Communication is the transmission of information or feelings form one person to another. It is the ability to communicate clearly and positively and enable you to to work well with others.

    Communication is crucial for every employee at every level in the hospitality industry.

    Managers must communicate:

    • the rules of the company
    • standards of customer service
    • information about the business to employees

    Communication skills include:

    • public speaking
    • presentation skills
    • interpersonal skills
    • leadership skills

    Two types of communication:

    • personal communication
    • non-personal communication

    Personal communication occurs when two or more people communicate directly, either in person or by telephone.

    Non-personal communication is a set message conveyed through the mass media such as:

    • television
    • radio
    • Internet
    • newspapers
    • magazines
    • fliers
    • pamphlets
    • billboards

    B. Customer product
    Marketing consists of developing products that meet customer needs and promoting those products so that customers will buy them. The term product refers to anything that a business sells. It includes goods and services.

    A good is an item you can touch.
    A service is an activity that is done for another person.

    The main product of the hospitality industry is service.

    C. Customer service
    Customer service in a hospitality business is the total customer experience with that business.

    The total customer experience includes:

    • the performance of the staff
    • the courtesy of the staff
    • the cleanliness of the property
    • the way customers are treated during their visit

    Quality customer service is the heart and soul of the hospitality and tourism industry. It is the reason why some businesses fail and others not only succeed, but thrive. With communication through technology at our finger tips, customers can spread the word when they have a positive experience; likewise, they can immediately post a negative one. Quality customer service will differ slightly from business to business, but there are some quality service elements that are universal to all businesses.

    Quality Service Elements:

    • customers expect to be treated with respect and dignity
    • requests should be handled with efficiency and accuracy
    • information and requests should be dealt with in an honest manner
    • monetary transactions should be handled with honesty and accuracy
    • facilities should be clean and attractive
    • employees should be able to anticipate customer needs

    View the following videos to understand the importance of customer service.

    You may use Customer Service Vocabulary handout to make crossword or word search puzzles to reinforce learning.

    D. Dining experience
    There are five basic styles of dining service in the food and beverage industry.

    Styles of Service include:

    • over-the-counter
    • drive-through
    • cafeteria
    • buffet
    • seated

    Over-the-counter service is a style that is used mainly in quick-service and fast-food restaurants. Customers place their orders at a counter, meals are paid for, and customers take their meals to a table.
    Ask students to name a few they are familiar with.

    Drive-through service is a style of service that many quick-service restaurants offer.

    Customers remain inside their vehicles through the process of:

    • ordering
    • paying
    • being served

    Ask students to name a few of this type of service.

    Cafeteria style of service is where customers are given a tray and silverware and napkin and food items are displayed along a counter. They request a food they want and a server serves the food and hands the customer the plate. Payment is made at the end of the serving line.
    Ask students to name some cafeterias in their community.

    In buffet service, food is arranged on tables throughout the dining area. Customers may walk around and serve themselves. Servers keep the displays of food stocked with food items.
    Again, ask students to name buffets in your community.

    Seated service is service in which customers are seated at a table. A server takes their order and then brings their food to the table.

    Three types of seated service are:

    • American
    • French
    • Russian

    American service is the most popular where food is plated in the kitchen. It is sometimes called plate service.

    French service is used in fine-dining restaurants. The meal is partially prepared in the kitchen. The server finishes cooking, carving, or flaming the food in front of the customer.

    In Russian service, the food is cooked and divided into portions in the kitchen. The portions of food are placed on silver trays and the server carries the tray of food to the table. The server then uses a special serving spoon and fork to place a portion on each guest’s plate. This style is often used at banquets.

    Discuss with your students the different types of service and which dining experience they prefer.
    Handouts Service Restaurants in Your Community and Types of Seated Service may be used to teach these objectives.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VI Handouts

    • Customer Service Vocabulary
    • Service Restaurants in Your Community
    • Types of Seated Service

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Allow students to make presentations to your class to encourage communication skills.
    • Role play customer service scenarios so that students may learn how to deal with situations.
    • Make crossword and/or word search puzzles using the Customer Service Vocabulary handout and a free software program to reinforce the lesson.
    • Discuss types of eating establishments in your community and allow your students to list them in the Service Restaurants in Your Community handout.
    • Review the types of service with your students using the Types of Seated Service handout.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Videos:
    Note: Show in this order:

    Modules VI: Customer Service Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. ________________ is crucial for every employee at every level in the hospitality industry.

    • a. Work
    • b. Leisure
    • c. Communication
    • d. Travel

    2. Communication skills include:

    • a. public speaking
    • b. presentation skills
    • c. interpersonal skills
    • d. all of the above

    3. The main product of the hospitality industry is:

    • a. service
    • b. travel
    • c. food
    • d. lodging

    4. All of these are considered quality service elements EXCEPT:

    • a. guest requests are handled only during business hours
    • b. facilities are clean and attractive at all times
    • c. employees anticipate customer needs
    • d. customers are treated with dignity and respect

    5. In _________ service, food is arranged on tables throughout the dining area.

    • a. cafeteria
    • b. drive-through
    • c. seated
    • d. buffet

    6. Which service is used in fine-dining restaurants?

    • a. American
    • b. French
    • c. Russian
    • d. Plate

  • VII. Technology

    Businesspeople Discussing Information on Monitor

    TEKS Addressed:

    (6) The student uses technology to gather information. The student is expected to:

    • (A) demonstrate and operate computer applications to perform workplace tasks
    • (B) examine types of computerized systems used to manage operations and guest services in the hospitality and tourism industry
    • (C) evaluate information sources for the hospitality and tourism industry

    (10) The student demonstrates research skills applicable to the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (B) use travel information to design a customized product for travelers

    (11) The student understands the importance of customer service. The student is expected to:

    • (C) plan a cost effective trip or itinerary to meet customer needs

    (9) The student explores and explains the roles within each department of the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (B) research the job qualifications for various positions to facilitate selection of career choices

    (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:

    • (D) develop strategies for achieving accuracy and organizational skills

    Module Content

    A. Computer application
    B. Design product

    A. Computer application
    Operating a computer in the work place
    Having a basic knowledge of computers is a must for anyone wanting to work in the hospitality and tourism field.

    Employees will need to know how to use:

    • email
    • enter and retrieve data
    • access work schedules
    • payroll information

    For management, the skills needed are more extensive.

    Supervisors, managers, and directors use computers to:

    • analyze models through spreadsheets
    • forecast consumer trends
    • manage inventories and sales
    • keep financial records

    Most employees are expected to have a basic knowledge of computers when hired, then the company provides training that is specific to their system on the job. Employees who desire to stay long-term with their employer, or want to be promoted will be expected to continually update their computer skills. As in any business related industry, technology in hospitality is ever evolving and changing with the demands and direction of the industry.

    B. Design Product
    Computerized systems used for operations and guest services
    Computer hardware and software is used extensively throughout the hospitality and tourism industry.

    They are utilized in:

    • hotel management
    • restaurant management
    • guest relations
    • online booking
    • spas
    • amusement park
    • sporting events

    All rely on computer technology to conduct business and bring in customers.

    One of the leading software systems, Silverbyte™, offers:

    • a central reservations system
    • front office management system
    • a guest service center
    • point of sale management
    • events scheduling

    The Fourth Hospitality™ software contains a recipe management system utilized by some of the top restaurant chains worldwide.

    Evaluating sources of information within Hospitality and Tourism
    Through technology, today’s consumer has access to multitudes of information related to hospitality and tourism.

    With the press of a key, a person can:

    • visit one website and secure hotel and airline reservations
    • rent a car
    • secure tickets for events and amusements

    Sometimes, there is so much access to vacation and leisure information, it is hard to know what source is the best, especially if you are headed overseas to a place you’ve never been.

    Some of the largest online travel sites include:

    • Orbitz
    • Travelocity
    • Kayak
    • Expedia

    Before booking, it’s wise to do a search and compare travel sites. Knowing consumers enjoy the convenience of booking from home at their leisure, businesses in hospitality continue to network and cooperate with online travel booking sites in order to gain and retain customers.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Allow students to review the different travel websites or Apps for the iPad. They will be able to see images of hotel rooms, attractions, and modes of transportation available.
    • Design a travel vacation scenario. Choose an amount, destination, mode of travel, hotel, and any other information to plan a vacation for a family, honeymoon, elderly couple, single people, and so forth.
    • Invite a representative from a software system used in hotels to demonstrate the program and its applications.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Module VII: Technology Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. An example of a computerized system one might see that is specific to the operations in hospitality would be a:

    • a. GPS tracking system
    • b. grading system
    • c. central reservations system
    • d. social networking site

    2. Orbitz and Travelocity are considered:

    • a. five star restaurants
    • b. universities that specialize in hospitality degrees
    • c. social networking sites
    • d. online travel sites

    3. A positive aspect of an online travel site should be:

    • a. little or no customer support
    • b. easy and secure to use
    • c. an acceptance of American Express credit cards only
    • d. containing only airline information

    4. An excellent way to teach students how to plan and customize travel products for tourists is to:

    • a. have them memorize the textbook
    • b. test them every couple of days
    • c. have them design a vacation package with different budgets
    • d. lecture them about customize travel products

  • VIII. Career Exploration

    TEKS Addressed:

    (5) The student researches, analyzes, and explores lifestyle and career goals. The student is expected to:

    • (A) prioritize career goals and ways to achieve those goals in the hospitality and tourism industry
    • (B) compare and contrast education or training needed for careers in the hospitality and tourism industry
    • (D) create a career portfolio

    (9) The student explores and explains the roles within each department of the hospitality and tourism industry. The student is expected to:

    • (B) research the job qualifications for various positions to facilitate selection of career choices

    (4) The student develops principles in time management, decision-making, and prioritizing. The student is expected to:

    • (B) analyze the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities
    • (C) analyze the various steps in the decision-making process
    • (D) work independently

    (3) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort. The student is expected to:

    • (C) display positive attitudes and good work habits

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Hospitality and Tourism for information about careers.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-hospitality-and-tourism/

    Module Content

    A. Personal success
    B. Personal management

    Module VIII Handouts

    A. Personal success

    Deciding on a career is one of the biggest decisions your students will make. Before they decide, they should learn as much as they can about different careers to be prepared for the world of work.

    Introduce them to Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster and AchieveTexas.

    This cluster includes four different career pathways:

    • restaurants and food and beverage service
    • lodging
    • travel and tourism
    • recreation, amusements, and attractions

    Each of these career pathways includes a variety of occupations grouped within similar areas of knowledge and skills. The occupations in each pathway range from entry-level positions to advanced positions.

    The career clusters model was developed by educators, employers, and professional groups who carefully examined what students would need to know in order to prepare for a good job.

    The benefits of a hospitality career include:

    • working with people
    • traveling
    • having a bright future

    The hospitality industry is the largest service industry in the world, and it is still growing. It is one of the few industries where you can start at the bottom and work your way up to the top.

    Hospitality is also one of the easier industries in which to start your own business.

    The hospitality industry has many advantages but also challenges.

    Advantages:

    • abundance of jobs
    • advancement opportunities
    • pleasant workplace
    • fast pace and variety
    • meeting people
    • travel

    Challenges:

    • hours of work
    • stress
    • working conditions
    • relocation

    The Occupational Outlook Handbook provides information and statistics on a wide range of occupations and individual jobs. This information is revised every two years and provides a detailed description of each occupation covered.

    Hospitality and Tourism occupations are found in the Food Preparation and Serving category.

    The O*NET OnLine has detailed descriptions of the world of work for use by job seekers, workforce development and HR professionals, students, researchers, and more.

    Information can be found for:

    • Tasks
    • Tools and Technology
    • Knowledge
    • Skills
    • Abilities
    • Work Activities
    • Job Zone
    • Education
    • Interest Code
    • Work Styles
    • Work Values
    • Wages and Employment Trends

    Career Exploration websites:

    B. Personal management

    Time Management

    Time management is the act or process of planning and exercising conscious control over the amount of time spent on specific activities, especially to increase effectiveness, efficiency or productivity.

    Time management refers to a range of:

    • skills
    • tools
    • techniques

    These are used to manage time when accomplishing:

    • specific tasks
    • projects
    • goals

    This set encompasses a wide scope of activities that include:

    • planning
    • allocating
    • setting goals
    • delegation
    • analysis of time spent
    • monitoring
    • organizing
    • scheduling
    • prioritizing

    Initially, time management referred to just business or work activities, but now includes personal activities as well.

    Examples of how to use time management effectively are:

    • use a calendar
    • eliminate time-wasters
    • combine activities when possible
    • don’t schedule every hour of every day
    • be flexible
    • maintain self-control when things don’t go as you planned

    Decision making

    Decision making and problem solving are ongoing processes of:

    • evaluating situations or problems
    • considering alternatives
    • making choices
    • following up with necessary actions

    Introduce your students to The FCCLA Planning Process for Individual and Team Action.
    This is a decision-making tool that supports the organization’s overall philosophy about youth-centered leadership and personal growth. It can be used to determine group action in a chapter or class or to plan individual projects.

    Planning Process:

    • Identify Concerns
      • brainstorm to generate ideas
      • evaluate your list and narrow it down
    • Set A Goal
      • clear mental picture
      • goal is achieved and evaluated
      • consider resources available
    • Form A Plan
      • decide what needs to be done
      • figure out who, what, where, when, and how
      • list other available resources
      • make a workable timetable
      • list possible barriers
      • decide way to recognize accomplishments
    • Act
      • carry out group or individual plan
      • use family and community members when needed
    • Follow Up
      • determine if goal was met
      • list improvements
      • share and publicize efforts
      • recognize members and thank people

    Balancing a Career, Family, and Leisure Activities
    Discuss with students that when they make a career decision, they may want to consider the roles they plan to have. A role is a set of responsibilities and expectations that go with an aspect of your life.

    Examples could include:

    • citizen
    • community member
    • consumer
    • employee
    • family member
    • friend
    • homemaker
    • neighbor
    • spouse and parent
    • student
    • volunteer
    • worker

    They must figure out a way to manage their time to meet these demands.

    One of the benefits of a hospitality career is that many of the jobs have flexible or part-time work hours.

    Work Habits
    Work habits are the basic, routine actions that you carry out every day at work. They provide the foundation for success at work. Good work habits help you be efficient and productive.

    Good work habits can include:

    • be on time
    • be at work every day
    • call your supervisor immediately if you become ill and must miss work
    • complete all work in a timely fashion
    • keep your work area neat and organized
    • be accurate
    • report mistakes or problems to your supervisor immediately
    • do not make personal calls from work

    Can you add any more?

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VIII Handouts

    • Chef Cook (PDF and Excel)
    • Competitive Sports Athlete (PDF and Excel)
    • Food and Beverage Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Hospitality and Tourism Career Wanted
    • Lodging Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Careers O*Net Flashcards
    • Recreation Attractions Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Rubric for Electronic Glogster™ EDU Career Poster
    • Travel and Tourism Director (PDF and Excel)
    • Ups and Downs of Careers in Hospitality and Tourism
    • Ups and Downs of Careers in Hospitality and Tourism (Key)

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites:

    Module VII: Career Exploration Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The most accurate source of occupational information put out by the U.S. government is the:

    • a. Occupational Outlook Handbook
    • b. The 2012 Census
    • c. The U.S. Employment Resource
    • d. The Federal Reserve Manual

    2. Within the OOH, hospitality and tourism occupations would be found in the ________________ category.

    • a. Healthcare
    • b. Military
    • c. Food Preparation and Serving
    • d. Education

    3. The benefits of a hospitality career include:

    • a. working with people
    • b. traveling
    • c. having a bright future
    • d. all of the above

    5. One of the challenges of a career in the hospitality industry is:

    • a. abundance of jobs
    • b. hours of work
    • c. pleasant workplace
    • d. travel

  • Quiz

    Principles of Hospitality and Tourism Online Course

    Progress:

    1. The definition of hospitality is to:

    2. QWL programs help employees:

    3. Judging whether something is desirable or undesirable is a part of our personal _______ system.

    4. The head of a hospitality organization such as a resort, would most likely be:

    5. Multitasking is the ability to carry out two or more things at the same time by one person.

    6. Skills an employee must have to work independently are:

    7. The definition of leadership is a person who exemplifies qualities needed to guide or ______ people to perform certain tasks.

    8. Regular staff meetings are used to:

    9. A document used to run an effective meeting is called a(an):

    10. FCCLA stands for:

    11. Qualities desirable in an effective leader include:

    12. Critical characteristics desired in workers that carry over into management positions are:

    13. A necessary communication skill for the workplace in today's technologically driven world are:

    14. Good spelling and grammar are necessary skills for anyone producing:

    15. Effective writing skills are a must to make:

    16. A collection of electronic evidence such as a resume, letter of introduction, and transcripts using multimedia, texts, and images would be called (a)an:

    17. A set of individual travel products such as airfare, hotel, car rental, that are combined under one price is called a:

    18. Nonverbal communication means without:

    19. The Hospitality and Tourism Cluster includes _______ career pathways.

    20. A type of Quick Service business is:

    21. The lodging industry consists of all businesses that provide food and beverage service.

    22. The travel industry consists of businesses that physically move people from one place to another.

    23. The tourism industry consists of businesses that organize and promote travel and vacations.

    24. Mathematical skills are needed in hospitality for:

    25. The last step in the FCCLA Planning Process is:

    26. Restaurants are divided into two areas:

    27. All of these areas represent the most risk, EXCEPT:

    28. Risk management has evolved over the past years to a:

    29. OSH Act is an acronym for:

    30. Employees are expected to do the following EXCEPT:

    31. SANITATION of kitchen equipment means to:

    32. EPA is an acronym for:

    33. ________________ is crucial for every employee at every level in the hospitality industry.

    34. Communication skills include:

    35. The main product of the hospitality industry is:

    36. All of these are considered quality service elements EXCEPT:

    37. In _________ service, food is arranged on tables throughout the dining area.

    38. Which service is used in fine-dining restaurants?

    39. An example of a computerized system one might see that is specific to the operations in hospitality would be a:

    40. Orbitz and Travelocity are considered:

    41. A positive aspect of an online travel site should be:

    42. An excellent way to teach students how to plan and customize travel products for tourists is to:

    43. The most accurate source of occupational information put out by the U.S. government is the:

    44. Within the OOH, hospitality and tourism occupations would be found in the ________________ category:

    45. The benefits of a hospitality career include:

    46. CTE stands for:

    47. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    48. TEKS stands for:

    49. Principles in Hospitality and Tourism is part of the ______________ Career Cluster.

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with:

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