Principles of Education and Training Online Course

  • Principles of Education and Training Online Course Introduction

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Principles of Education and Training is one of 4 courses in the Education and Training career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and seven modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. 12 pre-assessment multiple choice statements can be found at the end of the Introduction. Each module ends with five multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course, you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.
    —-
    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Principles of Education and Training for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.

    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-principles-of-education-and-training/

    Principles of Education and Training Course Outline
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/2013/06/23/principles-of-education-and-training-course-outline/

  • I. Education and Training Career Investigation

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student completes career investigations within the education and training career cluster.

    • (A) identify and describe the various careers found within the education and training career cluster
    • (B) analyze transferable skills among a variety of careers within the education and training career cluster
    • (C) recognize the impact of career choice on personal lifestyle
    • (D) assess the importance of productive work habits and attitudes

    Module Content

    Section I of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:

    A. Overview of Careers in Education and Training
    B. Job Skills and Responsibilities
    C. Work Ethics
    D. Advancement Opportunities
    E. Salary and Fringe Benefits
    F. Impact on Lifestyle
    —-
    See Lesson Exploring Careers in Education and Training.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-education-and-training/
    This lesson covers TEKS from section I Education and Training Career Investigations as well as from section III. Education and Training Career Opportunities.

    Refer to lesson Mapping the Road to a Career in Education for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/mapping-the-road-to-a-career-in-education/

    Refer to lesson Service Learning With a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Module I Handouts

    —-

    A. Overview of Careers in Education and Training

    Teachers Impact ALL Careers

    Teaching is the career that gives everyone the start for success in life. Teachers, from kindergarten through all levels of college, teach basic skills and sophisticated concepts that their students will need for jobs. Reading and writing are critical to learning for all other subjects.

    Teaching is one of the fastest growing occupations. Texas alone will need more than 25,000 new teachers in the next few years.

    Students who have interests in almost any topic can combine that area with a career in education. The Principles of Education and Training class is the place for high school students to assess their skills, investigate many opportunities, and develop a plan for reaching their goals.

    High school students have experienced many teachers through their years in school. Some were inspiring and others were not. They could be enrolled in Principles of Education and Training because they know they are passionate about a career in education. They could also be in the class because there was no other class to take during that time period. It is the instructor’s job to help all of the students explore the options and use the opportunity to learn more about themselves and options for their future.

    B. Job Skills and Responsibilities

    As students work on various activities, it is inevitable that they will ask about the meaning of new terms. Use the activity, Job Vocabulary listed at the end of the module to help students learn to articulate new terms and definitions.

    The Principles of Education and Training course is an excellent platform to remind students that many productive work habits for employment are also important for school. Teaching strategies for success help students now and later in the world of work. Teachers need to provide many opportunities for students to develop and use the following skills.

    Employability skills are those basic skills necessary for getting, keeping, and doing well on a job.
    They can be organized in many ways:

    Job Skills

    • basic academic skills
    • listening
    • math
    • oral communication
    • reading
    • science
    • writing

    Higher-Order Thinking Skills

    • decision making
    • learning
    • problem solving
    • reasoning
    • thinking creatively

    Personal Qualities

    • adaptable
    • cooperative
    • honest
    • positive attitude
    • punctual
    • responsible
    • self-confident
    • self-control
    • self-motivated
    • team spirit
    • well groomed

    C. Work Ethics

    The Educators’ Code of Ethics is set forth in Texas Administrative Code to provide rules for standard practices and ethical conduct toward students, professional colleagues, school officials, parents, and members of the community.
    Educators’ Code of Ethics

    The study of work ethics must include activities that include:

    • how an employee feels about their job, career or vocation
    • how one does his or her job responsibilities
    • how one gets along with others
    • what one would or would not do in a particular situation
    • personal qualities such as honesty, accountability,
    • valuing what is done, having a sense of purpose, dedication, loyalty, and many others

    Look at the resource below for articles about ethics:

    • Ethics Toolkit
      A site that includes a collection of articles and resources for teaching about ethics and values.
      http://www.ethics.org/

    D. Advancement Opportunities

    Get Organized
    It’s never too early for students to begin planning for future advancement opportunities. Beginning and continually updating an employment portfolio is a great place to start. The employment portfolio is an important part of several classes in the Education and Training Cluster. Students can begin one in the Principles of Education and Training class and add to it as they progress through the classes.

    • Developing an employment portfolio is an effective system for organizing information. Have students use a large, three-ring binder with tabs and divider pages. E-portfolios are also acceptable.
    • Use of a calendar. Show students how to create and effectively use a calendar on the computer or their personal phones if appropriate. Have students record due dates and assignments on their calendars. They can also use the calendar to record dates and hours for service learning and other school activities. This will be helpful in creating resumes, applying for jobs, and scholarships. There is a list of suggested items to collect in this class in the Teaching Strategies section at the end of this module.
    • Include journal writing – Include a section in their portfolio or have students create a classroom journal (spiral notebook or student made) to keep journal entries throughout the course. This a good way for students to document quick reflections and for students to refer to ideas they had earlier.
    • Incorporate student organizations as part of the course assignments.
      Family, Career, and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) – With each section of TEKS, have students complete a FCCLA Power of One assignment. By the end of the course, they will have done all five units and had a great exposure to FCCLA.

    • Texas Association of Future Educators (TAFE) – Look at the types of activities and projects available to students through this organization for future teachers at http://tafeonline.org/index.cfm
  • E. Salary and Fringe Benefits

    Students can compare the salary schedules for Texas Teachers.
    The Texas Education Minimum Salary Schedule can be found at the link below:
    http://tea.texas.gov/index2.aspx?id=4574

    Fringe benefits are an important consideration for employment. Examples of these benefits include: housing (employer-provided or employer-paid), group insurance (health, dental, life etc.), disability income protection, retirement benefits, daycare, tuition reimbursement, sick leave, vacation (paid and non-paid), social security, profit sharing, funding of education, and other specialized benefits.

    Students may research to compare and contrast salary schedules and fringe benefits of various school districts. This can be accomplished by completing an internet search and locating the human resources department of school districts. Example: San Antonio ISD

    F. Impact on Lifestyle

    Many people consider teaching as a career choice because they enjoy working with students or they are passionate about a particular topic, such as science or technology. Typically, administrators were formerly teachers and decided to acquire additional education to work in education at a different level.

    Some pursue careers as public school teachers because they want to have holiday and summer vacations that are frequently a part of teacher contracts. Teaching is also a choice that has opportunities in cities, rural areas, and foreign countries.

    Others are very successful in a career and become a trainer in that business or industry to assist others as they become successful.

    As students consider any career, it is helpful if they have information about how much money they could make and what the cost of living is in different locations.

    Do A Reality Check
    As students choose career options, it is helpful to know how much money they will need to live on after high school.

    The “Reality Check” web site gives several ways to explore expenses, careers, and earnings. It is an interactive site where students make choices and see costs, salaries, and the difference their choices make on costs involved with living in Texas.
    http://www.texasrealitycheck.com/

    Have students research the salary of an Education and Training related careers and develop a personal monthly and/or yearly budget on the proposed salary.

    An excellent resource for money information is:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Every Education and Training program is different.

    Below is a list of handouts and graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module I Handouts

    • Best Colors to Wear in a Job Interview
    • Career Investigation Rubric
    • Career Investigation
    • Company Contact Log
    • Company Mission Statement Examples
    • Interview an Educator
    • Is Education and Training the Right Cluster for You
    • Mapping Life Scenarios
    • Mapping the Road to a Career in Education Note-Taking
    • Mapping the Road to Success EnterExit Pass
    • Mapping Your Road to Success
    • Practicum in Human Services: The Seven Questions
    • Rubric Resume Assignment

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Job Vocabulary Graphic Organizer – Have students research to develop a list of words that describe skills or attitudes employers look for in employees. Compile all of the words into a class list. Use a T chart and the “Click and Clunk” strategy to develop definitions for each word.
    • Portfolio Requirements for Principles of Education and Training –
      Provide a list of suggestions for students to add to their portfolios throughout the term.
    • Writing Strategies – Writing Chart Graphic Organizer –
      This is a writing chart students can use to organize ideas and research before they begin writing essays or research papers. Have students use the chart to write a paper to identify and describe three careers in the Education and Training cluster that they are considering as career options.
    • My Life: Autobiography – Story Map Graphic Organizer –
      This is another strategy for organizing ideas for writing a paper about their life.
    • Have students think about and identify their favorite teacher. Have them list their qualities and habits.
    • Students could also work in groups to combine all of the qualities to “draw” a perfect teacher.
    • Have each student identify a productive work habit or attitude they would like to develop or improve. Do a “Power of One” FCCLA activity to create “A Better You” project at:
      http://www.fcclainc.org/assets/files/pdf/programs/powerofone/a_better_you.pdf
    • Research the term “fringe benefits.” Have students collect and calculate the value of various fringe benefits such as health insurance, investment plans, corporate child care and other programs.
    • Use the graphic organizer, “Online Information” to help students learn to keep track of web sites, usernames, and passwords as they use internet resources.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach,The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching,Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    YouTube™ Videos

    • Elementary School Teacher Career Information
      Elementary school teachers experience both pros and cons on the job. Weigh the pros and cons of being an elementary school teacher with tips from a third grade teacher in this free video on careers.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2izH5QBpyIc
    • High School Teacher Career Information: How To Become A High School Teacher
      There are many ways to become a high school teacher, but one unique way is through a program called Teach For America, which places people in different locations to teach secondary English. Learn how to become a high school teacher with tips from a high school teacher in this free video on career information.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtpzMj_uypc
    • Why We Teach: Our Profession Through Our Eyes
      Fellows share what inspires them in their profession and what we can learn by being a teacher.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SFSAcExAOu0

    Module I: Education and Training Career Investigation Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. _______________skills are those critical to getting, keeping, and doing well on a job.

    • a. Ethical
    • b. Employability
    • c. Language
    • d. Reading and writing

    2. Students need to realize that they need a strong foundation in basic ____________ skills for school and job success.

    • a. life
    • b. cultural
    • c. investigation
    • d. academic

    3. ___________ is an interactive web site to help students visualize the impact of career choice on lifestyle.

    • a. Career Choices
    • b. Building Bridges
    • c. Reality Check
    • d. Myers-Briggs

    4. Journal entries are good activities to help students _____ and remember.

    • a. analyze
    • b. reflect
    • c. study
    • d. take notes

    5. ________ is one of the fastest growing careers in Texas.

    • a. Nursing
    • b. Counseling
    • c. Teaching
    • d. Test developing

    6. Personal qualities such as honesty and accountability are a part of:

    • a. fringe benefits
    • b. work ethic
    • c. higher-order thinking skills
    • d. creativity

    7. An organization specifically for future teachers is called:

    • a. FHA
    • b. FFA
    • c. TAFE
    • d. HERO

  • II. History of Education

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student understands societal impacts within the education and training career cluster.

    • (A) summarize political and historical trends that have influenced the development of education across the United States
    • (B) identify cultural and societal changes that have affected educational systems across the United States
    • (C) use labor market information, knowledge of technology, and societal or economic trends to forecast job profiles within the education and training career cluster

    Module Content

    Module II of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:
    A. Historical Trends
    B. Cultural Changes and Trends
    C. Societal Changes and Trends
    D. Current Political Trends
    E. Impact of Technology
    F. Job Forecasting

    Refer to lesson History of American Education for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/history-of-american-education/

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Module II Handouts

    A. Historical Trends

    The Impact of History on Education

    High school students have been studying history for years. Unfortunately, what they remember is limited. This course provides an opportunity for students to make connections to the historical changes that led to the world they live in.

    The amount of information is overwhelming. It is a good strategy to guide students in breaking it down into centuries or decades. Students need many opportunities to investigate bits of history so they understand its impact in meaningful ways.

    Example: “The Civil War”
    President Abraham Lincoln, who opposed slavery, was elected in 1860. The Civil War began in 1861, as Southern slave owners fought to defend their way of life. The schools in the South were not as advanced as those in the North, and they fell further behind during the war.

    In 1863, President Lincoln signed the “Emancipation Proclamation” which freed the slaves.

    A few years later, in 1868, the Fourteenth Amendment was passed giving all Americans “equal protection” under the law. This was a forerunner to the famous Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court ruling in 1954 that mandated desegregation of all public schools. This meant that all public schools would be open to children of all races. It was several decades before these changes were evident throughout the United States. It paved the way for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that outlawed segregation in any public place. These important changes took over 100 years.

    There was explosive growth in American public schools at the end of the nineteenth-century. Statistics tell us that public school expenditures rose from $69 million in 1870 to $147 million in 1890 and public school enrollment increased from 7.6 million in 1870 to 12.7 million in the same decades. The US was providing more schooling to more children than any other nation due to the nineteenth-century movement for school reform.

    However, not all children could attend public schools TOGETHER. Forced to abandon tribal languages, customs, and dress, many Native American children were sent to special government schools. African Americans also faced exclusion, and many created their own schools.

    This is just a few of a series of historical events that illustrates how cultural, societal, economic and political influences worked together to ultimately create monumental changes for education. These same laws are still enforced as the United States experiences the continued influx of more and more children from different cultures who are also entitled to receive equal services in public schools.

    B. Cultural Changes and Trends

    Cultural – the behaviors and beliefs of a particular group of people

    • no religious freedom to religious freedom
    • religion required in schools to religion not allowed in schools
    • slavery to freedom
    • illiterate to literate
    • national to global or international
    • single culture to multicultural
    • women respected as dignified and proper to women as sexy, attractive, youthful
    • television and media

    C. Societal Changes and Trends

    Societal – a community or group of people having common traditions, institutions, and values

    • changing demographic trends, such as the impact of the baby boomers
    • the minorities are becoming the majorities
    • equality for races, sexes, no discrimination for age or handicaps
    • moves toward a “green” environment
    • changes encouraged by media toward violence and sex
    • children being exposed to more adult themes earlier in life
    • more people in alternative lifestyles
    • immigration and citizenship changes
    • television and media

    D. Current Political Trends

    Changes and Trends

    Educators who want to prepare students for the future, find it difficult to consider the trends and predict what will happen.

    Many of the changes and trends overlap and are difficult to differentiate. They are excellent topics to engage the students in analyzing, predicting, and just plain old thinking.

    Political-changes affected by laws or legislators

    • trust or distrust of government and political leaders
    • IDEA Act
    • Civil Rights Act
    • No Child Left Behind (NCLB)
    • The Perkins Act
    • ESEA Reauthorization

    E. Impact of Technology

    Impact of Technology – accomplishing tasks with technical methods or equipment, especially using computers

    • digital cameras, computers, smart boards, ipads
    • global connectivity
    • increased demand for technologically trained students, workers, and technicians
    • Internet and digital information
    • iPad in classrooms
    • online classes
    • online textbooks
    • paperless classrooms
    • television and media

    Economic – relating to the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services

    • the constantly changing value of the dollar
    • recessions, inflation, cost of living index
    • federal spending deficits, budget cuts
    • poverty levels including more women and children
    • immigrants living in substandard conditions
    • baby boomers retiring, increased numbers of jobs with fewer prepared applicants
    • moves toward a wealthy class and a poor class of people, a shrinking middle class

    These are a few of the trends and changes that have surfaced and repeated themselves throughout American history.

    F. Job Forecasting

    Most of the occupational web sites provide a wealth of job outlooks and forecasts. It is important to involve students in finding information and helping them apply it to determining their options for the future. Analyzing this data also shows students the importance of and types of skills that the changing job market will require, especially for the teachers, who will have the responsibility of preparing everyone to move the nation forward. Even presidents had to be taught at one time.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list graphic organizers/handouts you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module II Handouts

    • Education Accountability
    • History of American Education Note-Taking
    • History of American Education Research Paper
    • History of American Education Timeline version 2
    • Instructions for History of American Education Timeline
    • Job Forecasting
    • KWL Chart History of American Education
    • Rubric for History of American Education Research Paper
    • Rubric for History of American Education Timeline
    • Schools Past and Present
    • What Happened?

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Use “What Happened?” Graphic Organizer to analyze the effects of historical events. Students can work individually or in groups to choose different periods of time and show changes throughout history or follow the impact of a single significant historical event on education.
    • Use an American History textbook, encyclopedias, or internet research to complete a timeline activity. A website with information about American history timelines and education can be found at: http://www.cloudnet.com/~edrbsass/educationhistorytimeline.html
    • Divide students into groups to discuss and choose the most important historical events to influence education in American history. They could draw or print photos of these events to create a pictorial time line.
    • Students can use occupational information and technology, if available, to create graphs to compare job profiles within the education and training cluster and jobs in other clusters.
    • Small groups of students can write skits or plays to illustrate significant events in history and how they changed education. These could be made into videos.
    • Have students select current legislation and research the issues. They could organize projects to support the causes they support. This would be a natural tie in to the “Advocacy” STAR Event in FCCLA.
    • Students can work in teams with writers, actors, and videographers to create commercials for the hot jobs in education and training jobs.
    • This activity could go to a creative edge, if students developed ads for education and training jobs expected in the year 3000.
    • Assign students to look for issues about education in the news. Have each student choose one to predict what they think will happen and how the results will affect education.
    • For a “Family Ties” Power of One project, have students think of ways to use career information from their family members. One would be to interview family members about their first job and what job skills they think are very important.
    • Use the “Job Forecasting” graphic organizer to research data to predict future employment trends and analyze the reasons for those changes.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach, The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.
    • American History textbooks, Encyclopedias, and other Resource books

    Websites

    YouTube™ Videos

    Module II: History of Education Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The Civil Rights Act was a result of which historical events?

    • a. The Civil War
    • b. the Emancipation Proclamation
    • c. The Fourteenth Amendment
    • d. a, b, c

    2. The IDEA Act is a result of which type of influence?

    • a. societal
    • b. political
    • c. cultural
    • d. technology

    3. ______________trends relate to the production, distribution, and consumption of goods.

    • a. Cultural
    • b. Societal
    • c. Economic
    • d. Political

    4. Television and the media is what type of trend?

    • a. technology
    • b. societal
    • c. cultural
    • d. a, b, c

    5. Changes in the demographics of the baby boom generation will affect which trends?

    • a. societal
    • b. political
    • c. economic
    • d. a, b, c

    6. Analyzing employment outlook information is important because:

    • a. it show skills that may be needed in the future
    • b. helps teachers know what to teach to prepare the workforce for the future
    • c. takes up lots of time
    • d. a and b

    7. Reviewing historical trends in Principles in Education and Training helps students:

    • a. review their knowledge of history
    • b. connect historical events and apply knowledge to education
    • c. a and b
    • d. none of the above

  • III. Education and Training Career Opportunities

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student investigates career opportunities within the education and training career cluster.

    • (A) compare and contrast the specific career options found within each education and training cluster program of study
    • (B) use labor market information, knowledge of technology, and societal and economic trends to forecast job profiles within each cluster program of study
    • (C) use personal interests and aptitudes to identify a specific cluster program of study as a potential field of study

    Module Content

    Module 3 Handouts

    Module III of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:

    A. Personal interests: self assessments, aptitudes, interests, ability tests
    B. Occupational Outlook Handbook
    C. Employment Opportunities
    __

    See Lesson Exploring Careers in Education and Training.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-education-and-training/
    This lesson covers TEKS from section I Education and Training Career Investigations as well as from section III. Education and Training Career Opportunities.

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Refer to lesson Mapping the Road to a Career in Education for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/mapping-the-road-to-a-career-in-education/
    __

    A. Personal Interests: Self Assessments, Aptitudes, Interests, Ability Tests

    Helping high school students consider all of the career choices, even only those in the Education and Training Career Cluster, to find the one that might be a match for them, is a huge responsibility.

    For most of students’ lives, people have been telling them “You can be anything when you grow up.” High school is the time for them to seriously compare what they want to be with their skills and abilities.

    Fortunately, there are many resources that students can use to identify their aptitudes, abilities, and interests. There is also a wealth of information for them to use to narrow down the choices they have to find a career path. There are many places for students to locate profile assessments. Many of these sites are free and targeted for Texas. It is helpful for students to take several different assessments so they can compare the results.The Principles of Education and Training class is a good place for students to realistically analyze themselves but also to think “outside the box” as they identify their options.

    Some steps to assist students include:

    B. Occupational Outlook Handbook

    This is a very comprehensive collection of the most up-to-date occupational information. There is also a link for a teacher’s guide.
    http://www.bls.gov/ooh/

    OOH Teacher’s Guide for the Occupational Outlook Handbook at:
    http://www.bls.gov/ooh/About/Teachers-Guide.htm

    C. Employment Opportunities

    The following resources can be used to help students investigate employment/career opportunities.

    Ways to Get Started
    Career counselors say, “Never ask students on the first day of class, ‘What do you want to be?” Most students have no idea of what types of careers exist in any field, especially education and training. Nor do they realize the types of preparation that are required for most occupations.

    Texas Cares is an excellent source for free skill and interest assessments, information and videos about occupations and Texas job outlooks.
    Texas Workforce Commission
    http://www.texascaresonline.com/clusters/clusters.asp

    Another site with extensive information and videos with a national perspective is:
    O*NET program is the nation’s primary source of occupational information.
    http://www.onetonline.org/

    CareerOneStop compares state information to national perspectives:
    Pathways to career success. Tools to help job seekers, students, businesses, and career professionals. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor
    http://www.careerinfonet.org/occ_rep.asp?optstatus=011000000&soccode=253099&id=1&nodeid=2&stfips=48&search=Go

    These sites provide information that could be used in many ways in the Principles of Education and Training class. Allow time for students to complete the assessments and allow them to match their skills and interests to education and training related occupations. Your school may also subscribe to other sites that provide skills assessments. Ask the counselor for other suggestions that may be available for students.

    Education and Training cluster resources that can be printed or purchased for a nominal fee are available at AchieveTexas College and Career Initiative
    An education initiative designed to prepare students for a lifetime of success
    http://www.achievetexas.org/Education.htm

    Printed copies of this booklet are helpful, especially if computer access is not available.

    Graphic Organizers/Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module 3 Handouts

    • Career Research
    • THINK-PAIR-SHARE

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas:

    • Have students complete a FCCLA “Working on Working” Power of One project by investigating particular jobs.
    • Have students choose at least one of the online courses through Texas Work Prep LMS. This would show them an educational strategy that will continue to become more common as well as teach them job skills.
    • Have students create online Education and Training cluster scavenger hunts using the career magazines. This activity incorporates reading and technology skills.
    • Have students print or record the results of the assessment and inventories they take. Have them graph their various scores for comparison.
    • Divide the students into teams of two. Do a Think-Pair-Share activity with a partner with the graphic organizer in the Module Three Handouts. Students could discuss a variety of topics such as, “What do you think the top teaching career in 3000 will be? “What are the three most important skill for teachers?”

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach, The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    Videos

    Module III: Education and Training Career Opportunities Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. An Education and Training career listed as one of the the 10 fast growing careers is:

    • a. Support Services
    • b. Special Education Teachers
    • c. School Finance Officer
    • d. School Website Designer

    2. From the “What’s Your Plan After High School?” online magazine, what are the three Education and Training career pathways?

    • a. Administrators and Administrative Support, Teaching and Training, Support Services
    • b. Teaching and Training, Support Services, Corporate Services
    • c. a and b

    3. One source of free, online courses where students receive completion certificates is:

    4. OOH stands for:

    • a. Occupations on Hospitality
    • b. Occupational Outlook Handbook
    • c. Online Occupational Handbook
    • d. On Our Honor Handbook

    5. When investigating career choices, students should be encouraged to:

    • a. compare career options
    • b. compare societal and economic trends
    • c. only consider income levels
    • d. a and b

    6. It is important for students to take several different skill or aptitude assessments because:

    • a. they can compare results
    • b. they can think realistically about their abilities
    • c. they may identify a career they did not originally consider
    • d. all of the above

    7. The ________________is a collection of the most up-to-date occupational information.

    • a. Occupational Outlook Handbook
    • b. Achieve Texas
    • c. Texas is Best
    • d. all of the above

  • IV. Administration and Administrative Support - V. Professional Support Services

    Administration and Administrative Support and Professional Support Services

    TEKS Addressed

    (3) The student explores careers in administration and administrative support.

    • (A) summarize the various roles and responsibilities of professionals in the fields of administration and administrative support
    • (B) describe typical personal characteristics, qualities, and aptitudes of professionals in the fields of administration and administrative support
    • (C) investigate education and training alternatives after high school for a career choice within the student’s interest areas
    • (D) formulate education and training degree plans for various occupations within the fields of administration and administrative support

    Module Content

    This section of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:
    A. Descriptions of various careers
    B. Job skills and responsibilities
    C. Education and/or training
    D. Advancement opportunities
    E. Work ethics
    F. Salary and fringe benefits
    G. Impact on lifestyle
    __

    Professional Administration and Support Services

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student explores careers in professional support services.

    • (A) summarize the various roles and responsibilities of professionals in the field of professional support services
    • (B) describe typical personal characteristics, qualities, and aptitudes of professionals in the field of professional support services
    • (C) investigate education and training alternatives after high school for a career choice within the student’s interest areas
    • (D) formulate education and training degree plans for various occupations within the field of professional support services

    Module Content

    This section of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:
    A. Descriptions of various careers
    B. Job skills and responsibilities
    C. Education and/or training required
    D. Advancement opportunities
    E. Work ethics
    F. Salary and fringe benefits
    G. Impact on lifestyle

    Refer to lesson Service Learning With a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for addition activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Refer to lesson Mapping the Road to a Career in Education for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/mapping-the-road-to-a-career-in-education/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson Researching Learning Disabilities for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/researching-learning-disabilities/

    Module IV and V Handouts

    A. Descriptions of Various Careers

    High school students know that schools have teachers, principals, secretaries, counselors and possibly superintendents. However, most of them have no idea how many people with specialized training it takes to effectively operate school districts. School web sites contain a tremendous amount of information to help students investigate the administrative and support positions in their schools.

    In addition to the jobs in school districts, there are the thousands of jobs in Region Service Centers, and those at the state level through TEA.

    Go to the link below for a list of opportunities in the administrative/administrative support and professional support services area:
    http://www.onetonline.org/find/career?c=5&g=Go

    Click on one of the careers to see the tasks, tools, technology skills abilities, education, and job outlook in the nation.

    Scroll to the bottom of the section, click on Texas in the drop box to see comparisons of Texas and the national outlook. Watch the video about the career you selected that is on that site.

    This O*Net Online site contains most of the information students need to describe careers, summarize the roles, responsibilities, traits, education and opportunities for each career.

    It is also an excellent place for students to compare the various jobs and the salaries in different states.

    B. Job Skills and Responsibilities-Administrators

    Administrators have many responsibilities and need many skills to maintain effective schools and school districts.

    • Oversee all school operations
    • Set and monitor budgets and other financial considerations
    • Do public relations
    • Hire and supervise personnel
    • Plan for safe schools
    • Maintain school discipline
    • Oversee accountability issues, analyze scores, develop plans for remediation
    • Create measurable objectives
    • Partner in planning curriculum and instructional strategies
    • Communicate with staff, students, and parents
    • Support staff members, students, parents, and all programs
    • Participate in special events
    • Be informed about legislative matters
    • Create a positive environment
    • Lead and attend meetings
    • Complete paperwork
    • Solve problems
    • Make decisions
    • Collaborate with other staff

    Job Skills – Support Personnel

    Support staff in schools carry out a very wide range of tasks and responsibilities on a daily basis. These include:

    • administrative and financial tasks
    • provide direct back-up support for principals and other leadership staff
    • serve as a ‘welcoming face’ for all parents and visitors to the school
    • help prepare school newsletters and notices and maintaining the school website
    • ensure provision of resources for use in the classroom
    • develop and maintaining assessment and attendance databases and IT systems and procedures
      ensuring that the school facilities are in good order.

    Support staff also:

    • handle a great variety of student inquiries and requests
    • provide support and back-up for students and teachers both in the classroom and in the school as a whole
    • maintain well-functioning library and information retrieval systems
    • ensure that science laboratories and other practicum learning areas within the school are safe and appropriately set-up and resourced for each teaching–learning situation
    • care for students when they are unwell
    • administer first aid
    • reinforce a school’s policies and procedures for behavior
    • follow-up on students who are absent from school
    • provide a link between students, parents and teaching staff
    • encourage and support students in extra-curricular achievements through sports and other activities
      provide careers advice and guidance, including arranging for students to have real-life work experience t and take responsibility for specialized projects, according to particular needs or priorities nominated by the school

    C. Education and/or Training

    Each state has specific requirements for the education for administrators at different levels. Most need to have a master’s degree and an administrative certificate which may also involve passing specific exams. Some types of administrators and assistants may only need to have certain types of experience. For example, food service administrators would need experience in that area.

    The education and training for support staff varies with the specific position. For example, school nurses and counselors have different types of training requirements than office, food service, technology and classroom paraprofessionals.

    D. Advancement Opportunities

    With additional education, such as a master’s in education leadership or administration, some administrators, such as a principal, could advance to become an assistant principal or superintendent. Large districts may have several levels of administration at a campus or within the district.

    Support personnel have many opportunities for advancement. Often, school districts provide tuition assistance or other incentives for support personnel who want to acquire additional training.

    E. Work Ethics

    Ethics are standards that are based on moral judgments. Laws are what we legally can and can’t do. Ethics are what we should and should not do.
    http://tea.texas.gov/ethics/

    An educator’s ethics are based on actions and attitudes that are best for students.

    Six qualities that help educators make ethical decisions are:

    • appreciation for morals
    • empathy
    • knowledge
    • reasoning
    • courage
    • interpersonal skills

    The Texas Code of Ethics is available on the Texas Education Agency (TEA) site at:
    Educators’ Code of Ethics

    The National Education Association (NEA) Code of Ethics can be seen at:
    NEA – Code of Ethics

    Ethical issues involving educators and students are frequently in the news. It is important to remind students that unethical choices often get more media attention than all of the ethical ones.

    Another important consideration about educators and ethics is that it is important to be good role models in all areas of life, not just at school. Teachers throughout history are expected to be respectable members of the community.

    F. Salary and Fringe Benefits

    Salary

    Students tend to focus on the salary information associated with careers. The income that is listed, especially with many of the administrative careers, is impressive. It is helpful for them to investigate various terms of contracts, length of contracts, and other factors, such as taxes, that effect what is actually taken home each pay period.

    Historically, an important benefit for educator’s is that in many cases, their salary is divided into equal payments even though they may have periods of time that they are off for holidays and summer vacations. Another consideration is teachers usually actually teach class for regular hours that are a shorter work day than many occupations. However, they also spend extra hours planning and preparing for the school day. They may also have extra duties such as sponsoring school activities.

    Fringe Benefits

    Fringe benefits are compensation that are given to an employee in addition to regular pay. These could include:

    • retirement or pension plans
    • medical insurance for the employee or family members
    • holidays or day off
    • life insurance
    • travel reimbursement or provision of a vehicle to drive
    • child care or reimbursement for care
    • discounts on services or equipment
    • reimbursement for purchase of uniforms, supplies or equipment

    G. Impact of Education Careers on Lifestyle

    Educators, especially administrators, seem to live their jobs as they are at school during the day and attend school activities and sporting events after school and on week-ends. Support personnel and other school employees may also work extra hours. The balance with this is that most have extended time off in the summers and on holidays.

    Educators are encouraged to continue their education and may receive compensation or tuition reimbursements as a motivation. They have job security and there are usually job openings if teachers need to relocate.

    Most educators will agree that it is a very rewarding career. It is a way to make and impact on the present and the future.

    The education profession is not among the highest paid careers. Many successful educators agree that they would not consider any other profession.

    Graphic Organizers/Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module IV and V Handouts

    • Administrative Career Research
    • Administrator, Administrative Support, Professional Support
    • Administrator/Administrative Support and Professional Support Services List
    • Career Research – Education Administration
    • Career Research – Educational Support Staff
    • Job Descriptions of Careers
    • Job Shadowing Project Rubric
    • Job Shadowing Project
    • KWL Chart Support Staff
    • KWL Education Administration
    • Note Taking Researching Learning Disabilities
    • Note Taking Support Staff Creating a Strong Learning Community
    • Researching Learning Disabilities Project Rubric
    • Researching Learning Disabilities Project
    • Researching Learn Main
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition (Key)
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Careers Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Careers Competition (Key)
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Researching Learning Disabilities Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Researching Learning Disabilities Competition (Key)
    • Students With Disabilities
    • Students With Disabilities (Key)
    • TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition
    • TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Careers Competition
    • The Way We Were
    • Writing Starters Chart

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students could use Microsoft Office or other software to make a flow chart with all of the jobs in the local school district.
    • They could invite each of the administrators, administrative support and support service employees to come to the class to be interviewed about their positions, advice they would offer, the training and other jobs they have had, why they came to this district, and other information about education careers. Students could make videos of the interviews to show to other classes in the future.
    • Have students obtain the district job application. Discuss education and experiences necessary to be a good candidate based on information requested on the application.
    • Interview the administrative support person responsible for fringe benefits. Have students find out how much the various benefits cost employees. Record each to calculate the value of the benefits.
    • Have students conduct mock job interviews. They could assume various roles such as superintendent or principal hiring support personnel. They could be prepared to discuss job requirements, desired qualities, skills needed, and fringe benefits.
    • Collect job outlook information or salaries to compare for various jobs or locations. Have students make graphs to illustrate their findings.
    • Identify education ethics controversies in the news. Discuss the issues and encourage students to predict how they think it should be handled.
    • Give each student a note card. Have students use the Graphic Organizer, Writing Starters Chart, to write a sentence on the note card that would be their “ticket” out of class. The writing starters could also serve as ideas for journal entries.
    • Students could develop and complete a FCCLA “Take the Lead” Power of One project.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks:

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach, The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    YouTube™ Videos:

    Module IV: Administration and Administrative Support and Module V: Professional Support Services Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Professional support services include:

    • a. Librarians
    • b. Technology Specialists
    • c. Superintendents
    • d. a and b

    2. Administrative Support positions could include:

    • a. Distance Learning Coordinators
    • b. Curriculum Coordinators
    • c. Librarians
    • d. a and b

    3. Coaches are considered:

    • a. Administrative support careers
    • b. Administrators
    • c. Professional Support careers
    • d. a and c

    4. Ethics are:

    • a. rules
    • b. are a set of moral guidelines educators should follow
    • c. laws
    • d. protection for students

    5. Fringe benefits:

    • a. are compensation in addition to salary
    • b. could include health and life insurance
    • c. vehicle insurance
    • d. a and b

    6. All school staff need to have skills for:

    • a. communicating well
    • b. working as a team
    • c. having a positive attitude
    • d. all of the above

    7. With additional education and/or training, teachers often have career advancement opportunities:

    • a. to become principals
    • b. to become professional support personnel, such as curriculum specialists
    • c. to become superintendents
    • d. all of the above

  • VI. Teaching/Training

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student explores careers in teaching and training

    • (A) summarize the various roles and responsibilities of professionals in the fields of teaching and training
    • (B) describe typical personal characteristics, qualities, and aptitudes of professionals in the fields of teaching and training
    • (C) investigate education or training alternatives after high school for a career choice within the student’s interest areas
    • (D) formulate education or training degree plans for various occupations within the fields of teaching and training

    Module Content

    This section of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:

    A. Descriptions of various careers
    B. Job skills and responsibilities
    C. Education and/or training
    D. Advancement opportunities
    E. Work Ethics
    F. Salary and fringe benefits
    G. Impact on lifestyle
    __

    Refer to lesson Service Learning With a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for addition activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Refer to lesson Researching Learning Disabilities for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/researching-learning-disabilities/

    Refer to lesson Mapping the Road to a Career in Education for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/mapping-the-road-to-a-career-in-education/

    Module 6 Handouts

    A. Descriptions of Various Careers

    Why Become A Teacher?

    Most teachers believe that they are drawn to teach because of “a calling.”

    Other reasons teachers choose the profession include:

    • they were influenced by a favorite teacher
    • they like to work with children and young people
    • the job security teaching provides
    • the benefits of a long summer vacation and holidays
    • they are following a family tradition
    • they have a passion for a certain subject
    • they value education and the opportunities it provides to others
    • it is a job that has opportunities in large and small towns, in almost every area of the world
    • the respected status of the teaching profession

    Various Careers in Teaching

    Though most students have a good idea about types of teachers in public schools, they may have limited knowledge of teachers or trainers in non-traditional careers.

    Some of these could include:

    • Archivists
    • Curators, Museum staff
    • Fitness Trainers
    • Dietitians and Nutritionists
    • Historians
    • Interpreters and Translators
    • Nurse Educators
    • Writers, Authors, Poets, and Lyricists
    • Recreation, Outdoor educators
    • Self-Enrichment Educators
    • Training Specialists in Business and Industry
    • Department of Defense Overseas School Teachers
    • Cooperative Extension Agents
    • Educators with Texas Parks and Wildlife, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, the National Parks
    • Educators and trainers with the entertainment industries, such as Disney
    • Educators affiliated with television programming, Internet and magazines

    B. Job Skills and Responsibilities

    Obviously, such a variety of careers requires many different types of personal characteristics, skills, qualities, types of education and experiences.
    It is easy for students to understand this as they look at the types of teachers in the school and the various teachers they have been taught by throughout their years in school.

    The handout, List of Teaching Careers select both traditional and non-traditional teaching careers to compare and consider.

    Teachers should be:

    • Organized
    • Decisive
    • Motivated
    • Hard-working
    • Trustworthy
    • Capable of coping with tension
    • Creative
    • Honest
    • Fair
    • Patient
    • Caring
    • Kind
    • Tolerant of differences

    Teachers may:

    • Teach one or more subjects
    • Develop lesson plans
    • Maintain a positive environment with appropriate discipline
    • Evaluate progress and track performance
    • Attend meetings
    • Complete paperwork
    • Cooperate with peers and superiors
    • Communicate effectively with students, parents, peers and all school staff members

    A Teacher’s Job Is Never Done

    Teachers at different levels have various types of roles in addition to teaching. Teachers do all of the things that work together to make each school day and year flow from beginning to end.

    Some of these roles include:

    • Playground, Lunchroom, Hall Monitor
    • Adviser for Organizations and Clubs
    • Class Sponsor
    • Fundraiser
    • Committee Member, Leader
    • Role model
    • Community Leader
    • Writer
    • Interacting with Technology
    • Documenting Information
    • Test Administrator
    • Motivator
    • Sponsor for cheerleaders, prom
    • Bus Driver

    Lesson: Researching Learning Disabilities

    C. Education and Training

    How to Become a Teacher

    The traditional path to becoming a teacher is by completing a university teacher education program. States issue teaching certificates or licenses based on criteria they establish. Teaching certification in some areas may be available through programs that recognize life experiences, other types of college degrees, or military service as part of the preparation for a teaching credential.

    Teachers today are better trained than ever before since over half of them hold master’s degrees. The majority of teachers are white, married women with children. More information and statistics about teachers in the United States can be found at the National Education Association website at:
    http://www.nea.org/

    This site has current information about education, educators, and the issues that are affecting them. Students and teachers can use the site to learn about the history of education and legislation that may impact the future.

    D. Advancement and Opportunities

    In the United States, there are more people in the teaching profession than in any other career. There will be a need for more than two million teachers in the next few years because of the high numbers of teachers who will be retiring. Another reason for the increasing need for teachers is that many recently trained teachers plan to have several careers throughout their lives. They do not plan to teach until they are eligible to retire.

    E. Work Ethics

    Teachers Are Professionals- see http://tea.texas.gov/ethics/

    The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) is the profession for people who work in early childhood education. Their web site includes resources and position papers supported by people who work with children between the ages of birth and eight years.

    Read the “Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment.” It is was one of many position statements that are excellent sources for student review at:
    http://www.naeyc.org/positionstatements/ethical_conduct

    Elementary teachers have professional organizations, including the Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI). Look at the many global resources and links under the “Global Resources” tab on the Home page at:
    http://www.acei.org/

    The middle grades may include any of the grades five through nine. The professional organization for this level is called the Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE). Students interested in working with this age of students should review their web site at:
    http://www.amle.org

    High school teachers often participate in professional organizations that are organized by the various subject matter areas. For example, Family and Consumer Science teachers may join Family Consumer Sciences Teachers Association of Texas:
    http://fcstat.org/

    F. Salary and Fringe Benefits

    Salaries may be determined by state salary schedules, local salary above the state base salary, and extra compensation for specific jobs or additional assignments. Teachers sign contracts that define their responsibilities, fringe benefits, salary, and dates of employment.

    G. Impact on Lifestyle

    Teaching is a career that blends well with nurturing. Whether taking care of a class of students or a family, teachers have longer vacations and holidays. They also do a lot of planning and preparing that can be done after hours at school or at home. (That may not be a benefit, but it does affect a teacher’s lifestyle.)

    When teachers move to a new area, they can usually find a job. There is also job security with the need for teachers increasing. It is a career that allows time and compensation for additional education and staff development. Teachers can specialize in areas or obtain additional training and certification to become eligible for administrative positions.

    Many people consider teaching as a career choice because they enjoy working with students or they are passionate about a particular topic, such as science or technology. Typically, administrators were formerly teachers and decided to acquire additional education to work in education at a different level.

    Some pursue careers as public school teachers because they want to have holiday and summer vacations that are frequently a part of teacher contracts. Teaching is also a choice that has opportunities in cities, rural areas, and foreign countries.

    Handouts and Graphic Organizers

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module 6 Handouts

    • Education Accountability
    • List of Careers in Teaching
    • My Career Path
    • The Way We Were

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have individual students create a list of all the types of teachers they can recall. Divide them into small groups to compare and combine their lists. Give each student a copy of the handout, “List of Teaching Careers.” Compile the lists to develop a list of teaching and training opportunities.
    • Incorporate math skills by having students compare salaries and job outlooks between Texas, national and other states with the data available at CareerOneStop
      They can make graphs and charts to contrast traditional and non-traditional teaching occupations,
    • Interview other teachers to discover what types of education and experience they have. They could use the graphic organizer included below, My Career Path Students could present the information in class or make a video of the interview.
    • Invite retired teachers to visit the class and tell about their experiences in earlier years. Students could video or take photographs to make a display at school or in a local museum. Use graphic organizer, The Way We Were to research types of education, certification, fringe benefits, salaries, and other teaching differences.
    • Make a survey to discover why teachers chose the profession. Students could develop the survey, administer it online through a source such as surveymonkey.com. After collecting the results, they could publish the results in a brochure or on the school web site.
    • Identify non-traditional teachers who are working in the area. Invite them to serve on a panel to answer questions about their career training and experiences.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach, The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    • AchieveTexas
      The web site with information about all career clusters. It includes many resources.
      http://www.achievetexas.org/Education.htm
    • Association for Childhood Education International (ACEI).
      The web site for professionals working with elementary school programs.
      http://www.acei.org/
    • Association for Middle Level Education (AMLE).
      A site for the professional organization for educators involved with middle school programs.
      http://www.amle.org
    • Family and Consumer Sciences Teachers Association of Texas
      Website for family and consumer sciences teachers professional organization.
      http://fcstat.org/
    • Labor Marker and Career Information
      Website provides the online career magazines or information about purchasing printed copies.
      http://www.lmci.state.tx.us/
    • National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
      Website for the organization for people who work in early childhood education. Includes resources and position papers supported by individuals who work with children between the ages of birth and eight years.
      http://www.naeyc.org
    • National Education Association (NEA)
      The web page for the National Education Association
      http://www.nea.org
    • O*Net Online
      This site provides lists of tasks, tools, knowledge, skills, abilities, work activities, and other data, it clarifies the various career choices available and what they involve.
      http://www.onetonline.org/
    • Texas Cares
      This site has assessments, videos, resource lists, and other information about Texas careers.
      http://www.texascaresonline.com/
    • Texas Code of Ethics
      A listing of ethics guidelines for Texas educators.
      http://tea.texas.gov/ethics/

    Youtube™ Videos

    Module VI: Teaching/Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1.The National Association for the Education of Young Children is a professional organization for people who work with:

    • a. children under the age of eight
    • b. children before they attend public school
    • c. elementary school children
    • d. kindergarten children

    2. Over half of teachers today hold _________ degrees.

    • a. bachelor and master
    • b. master and doctoral
    • c. specialized
    • d. secondary

    3. Regardless of the tasks teachers are assigned in addition to teaching, all teachers are always:

    • a planners
    • b. role models
    • c. motivators
    • d. underpaid

    4. Teacher responsibilities include:

    • a. communicating with parents
    • b. planning and evaluating for learning
    • c. maintaining a safe classroom
    • d. a, b, and c

    5. Qualities that increase a teacher’s effectiveness include:

    • a. creativity
    • b. dependability
    • c. good listening skills
    • d. a, b, and c

    6. There will be a need for ______________teachers in the next few years:.

    • a. 2000
    • b. 10,000
    • c. 2 million
    • d. 500,000

    7. Teachers or trainers in non-traditional careers include:

    • a. archivists
    • b. curators
    • c. trainers with corporations, such as Disney
    • d. all of the above

  • VII. Education and Career Planning

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student explores options in education and career planning.

    • (A) develop a graduation plan that leads to a specific career choice in the area of interest
    • (B) identify high school and dual enrollment courses related to specific career cluster programs of study
    • (C) identify and compare technical and community college programs that align with interest areas
    • (D) identify and compare university programs and institutions that align with interest areas

    Module Content

    Module 7 Handouts

    This section of the Principles of Education and Training course is divided into the following units of study:
    A. Higher education: university, community college, or technical program opportunities
    B. Education philosophy
    __

    A. Higher Education: University, Community College, or Technical Program Opportunities

    Make Every Class Count

    Dreams are great. Goals are important. But, putting the plan into writing is the best way to help students sort through all of the information, their interests, abilities, required classes, electives, extracurricular activities, work, service learning, and other factors to find the path to the best career.

    It is important for students to understand that they are unique and their education should be planned to help them accomplish their plans. They should consider each class and think about what would help them acquire the skills and abilities they will need to be successful. Students should try out as many areas as they can to collect as many experiences as possible as they go through public school. Students must realize that school is for them, not for their teachers. They should make every class and activity count for their benefit.

    Throughout the Principles of Education and Training class, students investigate a variety of careers, some they have been exposed to all of their lives, others they may have never considered. If they are freshmen or sophomores, they think that making decisions about their future is a task for later. Junior and seniors are beginning to realize that time passes quickly and decisions about the time after high school graduation need to be a priority.

    Ask the School Counselor

    Each district makes choices about the number of credits, electives, types of classes and other issues that students need to consider as they plan their education.

    The school counselor can provide information about:

    • number of credits required for graduation
    • types of credits required, such as the number of elective credits necessary for graduation
    • programs such as recommended plan or minimum plan
    • a list of classes offered at the school and the number of credits for each class
    • dual credit classes and the process and requirements for taking them
    • classes that lead to Statewide Articulation Credits
    • the required sequence of courses, for example Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, Pre-Calculus
    • options such as Advanced Placement or Credit Recovery programs
    • the recommended sequence of classes, such as the classes for a particular career cluster
    • forms for recording their education and career plans

    Where To Go From High School?

    High school students may be overwhelmed about the types of education after high school, or secondary education.

    Postsecondary programs include:

    • Community Colleges that offer Associate Degrees and credits that transfer to universities.
    • Technical Schools that provide skill development and certifications or licenses.
    • Universities that provide education for bachelor degrees and advanced studies for master’s and doctoral degrees.
    • Online programs are increasingly available for all or part of the requirements for degrees.
    • Most public school teachers need to have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited university and successful completion of licensing exams.

    The Plan

    Students need to realize that when they write a plan down, they can always make changes. At first it is like a rough draft that can be reviewed and edited as they obtain more information about their future.

    The career plans on the AchieveTexas website include courses, suggestions for curricular and extracurricular activities and post secondary options. The plans can be downloaded and personalized for a school district prior to printing. Students can also make additions or changes on their personal plan before making copies for their portfolio.

    • Another site with national college information, Adventures in Education, is available at:
      http://www.aie.org/

    Another resource for students to review is:

    • Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities
      This guide to Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities helps students connect with educational institutions across the United States and Canada
      http://www.trade-schools.net/

    B. Education Philosophy

    A philosophy of education is a set of principles that an individual uses to guide how and why they teach.

    Creating a philosophy of education is a perplexing task for students who are just beginning to see themselves as educators. One way to help students think through this process would be to do a series of journal entries or other assignments with sentence starters to stimulate their thoughts. Some suggestions are included in the handout, “My Philosophy of Education” included in the handouts section below.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Every Education and Training program is different. List ways to use or adapt the graphic organizers to meet the needs of various students.

    Module 7 Handouts

    • Look It Up
    • My Philosophy of Education
    • What Is The Difference

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Refer to lesson Preparing for YOUR FUTURE! (7A, B, C, D)
    • Have students create a graduation plan that leads to a specific career choice using the local school form or the one at:
    • Do the Look It Up graphic organizer activity to help students understand and articulate career vocabulary. This activity could be extended by dividing students into teams. When a vocabulary word or phrase definition is read out loud, a member of each team goes to the board to write the correct term. Include abbreviations for colleges and universities.
    • Obtain scholarship application forms from a variety of donors. Divide students into small groups. Have each group review the application and tell the class about what it requires.
    • Have students complete the What Is The Difference? graphic organizer included below to compare and contrast post-secondary education options.,
    • Assign students the My Philosophy of Education graphic organizer included below to organize their thoughts and ideas about education. This could be kept in the student portfolio.
    • Complete a FCCLA “Speak Out For FCCLA” Power of One project to tell others about the projects and activities they have completed in the program. They can work with their adviser to submit their name to the state and national offices for recognition of their efforts.

    —-

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach, The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    • Achieve Texas
      The web site with information about all career clusters. It includes many resources.
      http://www.achievetexas.org/Education.htm
    • Adventures in Education
      A web site with national college information
      http://www.aie.org/
    • College for Texans
      An excellent resource to help Texas students locate colleges, compare costs, and ask questions.
      http://www.collegefortexans.com/
    • Labor Market and Career Information
      This web site provides the online career magazines or information about purchasing printed copies.
      http://www.lmci.state.tx.us/
    • O*Net Online
      This site provides lists of tasks, tools, knowledge, skills, abilities, work activities, and other data, it clarifies the various career choices available and what they involve.
      http://www.onetonline.org/
    • Texas Cares
      This site has assessments, videos, resource lists, and other information about Texas careers.
      http://www.texascaresonline.com/
      Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities
      This guide to Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities helps students connect with educational institutions across the United States and Canada
      http://www.trade-schools.net/

    Videos

    Module VII: Education and Career Planning Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A graduation plan:

    • a. describes activities to be conducted on the night of graduation from high school
    • b. lists courses and activities to complete to reach a career objective
    • c. should be reviewed every year of high school
    • d. b and c

    2. ________________ allows junior or senior students to enroll in a college course and simultaneously earn high school and college credit for the course.

    • a. Credit recovery
    • b. Dual credit
    • c. Statewide articulated classes
    • d. a, b, and c

    3. Career learning experiences could include:

    • a. Internships
    • b. Job Shadowing
    • c. Career preparation classes
    • d. a, b, and c

    4. Curricular experiences could include:

    • a. FCCLA
    • b. TAFE
    • c. 4-H
    • d. a and b

    5. A(n)______________is a set of principles a person uses to guide how and why they teach.

    • a. educational career plan
    • b. Texas Achievement Plan (TAP)
    • c. Philosophy of Education
    • d. List of TEKS

    6. Statewide articulation agreements allow students to bank credit for specific classes when:

    • a. teachers have met requirements
    • b. students meet requirements
    • c. local high schools and colleges have articulation agreements
    • d. a, b, and c

    7. (A) _________________may change as students and educators have more teaching experiences.

    • a. Career plans
    • b. Philosophy of education
    • c. Set of goals
    • d. all of the above

  • VIII. End of Course Project Options Lesson and Overview/Course Outline

    An excellent way to end the semester or school year is with a culminating course project. See End of Course Project Options Lesson for Principles of Education and Training.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/end-of-course-project-options-principles-of-education-and-training/

    Culminating activities at the end of the course give students an opportunity to reflect and apply all of their knowledge and skills into an end of course project. They could be encouraged to create ideas for their activities or choose from a list such as those below:

    1. Each Principles of Education and Training students could choose a different career in the Education and Training cluster. After researching, they could create a display with photos, videos, or memorabilia to educate others about that career. Other classes or grades could be invited to view the “Education Career Fair.” Representatives from colleges, technical schools, and universities could also participate.
    2. Each student could choose a different country in the world. They could develop a presentation to teach other students about teaching and education in their country. This could include making models of schools, classes, or information about teacher training programs.

    Overview

    The Principles of Education and Training course is the foundation class for the Education and Training Career Cluster. High school students have been exposed to many types of teachers and administrators though their years in school. This class helps them analyze the details of teaching as a profession.

    Students have many opportunities to investigate teaching, corporate training, administration, and administrative support jobs. They research the types of qualities, skills, tasks, benefits, and salary levels associated with various occupations.

    After a review of the history of education in the United States, students also identify cultural, societal, political and technological changes that have effected the education process. They learn to use labor market information to compare jobs in Texas and the United States.

    Important aspects of the Principles of Education and Training course include having each student create a high school graduation/career plan that lists the steps to follow to obtain their chosen career in education and training as well as to begin a basic career portfolio which will updated yearly. Their completed portfolio will ultimately be shared with Education and Training stakeholders at the end of their Practicum in Education and Training course.

    Principles of Education and Training Course Outline
    The lessons in this course may be used in any sequence. The suggested sequence order is based on the Scope and Sequence for the course.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/2013/06/23/principles-of-education-and-training-course-outline/

  • References and Resources

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Putting It All Together, Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2010.
    • Reaching to Teach,The Texas Tech Curriculum Center for FCS, 2005.
    • Teaching, Goodheart-Wilcox Company, 2010.

    Websites

    Videos

  • Quiz

    Principles of Education and Training Online Course

    Progress:

    1. ______________________skills are those critical to getting, keeping, and doing well on a job.

    2. Students need to realize that they need a strong foundation in basic ________________skills for school and job success.

    3. ______________ is an interactive website to help students visualize the impact of career choice on lifestyle.

    4. Journal entries are good activities to help students _____________ and remember.

    5. _______________ is one of the fastest growing careers in Texas.

    6. Personal qualities such as honesty and accountability are part of:

    7. An organization specifically for future teachers is called:

    8. The Civil Rights Act was a result of which historical event(s)?

    9. The IDEA Act is a result of which type of influence?

    10. __________________ trends relate to the production, distribution, and consumption of goods.

    11. Television and the media are what type of trend?

    12. Changes in the demographics of the baby boom generation will affect which trends?

    13. Analyzing employment outlook information is important because:

    14. Reviewing historical trends in Principles of Education and Training helps students:

    15. An Education and Training career listed as one of the 10 fast growing careers is:

    16. From the "What's Your Plan After High School?" AchieveTexas online magazine, what are the three Education and Training career pathways?

    17. One source of free, online courses where students receive completion certificates is:

    18. OOH stands for:

    19. When investigating career choices, students should be encouraged to:

    20. It is important for students to take several different skills or aptitude assessments because:

    21. The ___________________is a collection of the most up-to-date occupational information.

    22. Professional support services include:

    23. Administrative support positions could include:

    24. Coaching is considered a/an:

    25. Ethics are:

    26. Fringe benefits could include:

    27. All school staff need to have skills for:

    28. With additional education and/or training, teachers often have career advancement opportunities to:

    29. The National Association for the Education of Young Children is a professional organization for people who work with:

    30. Over half of teachers today hold ____________ degrees.

    31. Regardless of the tasks teachers are assigned in addition to teaching, all teachers are always:

    32. Teacher responsibilities include:

    33. Qualities that increase a teacher's effectiveness include:

    34. There will be a need for ________________ teachers in the next few years.

    35. Teachers or trainers in non-traditional careers include:

    36. A graduation plan:

    37. ________________ allows junior or senior students to enroll in a college course and simultaneously earn high school and college credit for the course.

    38. Career learning experiences could include:

    39. Curricular experiences could include:

    40. A(n) _________________ is a set of principles a person uses to guide how and why they teach.

    41. Statewide articulation agreements allow students to bank credit for specific classes when:

    42. There are ___ career clusters.

    43. CTE stands for:

    44. (A) ________________ may change as educators have more teaching experiences.

    45. CTE courses prepare students with:

    46. THECB is the acronym for:

    47. TEA is the acronym for:

    48. The course Principles of Education and Training:

    49. The course Principles of Education and Training is:

    50. The course Principles of Education and Training is in the:

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