Practicum in Hospitality Services Online Course

  • Practicum in Hospitality Services Online Course Introduction

    welcome

    (1) A unique practicum experience provides opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences. Practicum in Hospitality Services integrates academic and career and technical education; provides more interdisciplinary instruction; and supports strong partnerships among schools, businesses and community institutions with the goal of preparing students with a variety of skills in a fast-changing workplace.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Practicum in Hospitality Services is one of 9 courses in the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and fourteen modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, and slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course, you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and valid email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com


    NOTE
    From the State Board of Education Certification
    Figure: 19 TAC §231.1(e)
    ASSIGNMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL PERSONNEL, PART I
    REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSIGNMENT OF TEACHERS

    • The school district is responsible for ensuring that each teacher assigned to this course has completed appropriate training in state and federal requirements regarding work-based learning and safety. This requirement is effective beginning with the 2010-2011 school year.

    This online course DOES NOT fulfill SBOE requirements but does serve as professional development for six (6) Continuing Professional Education Credits.

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Practicum in Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-practicum-in-hospitality-services/

  • I. Professionalism

    Front view portrait of four business executives sitting in a line

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student uses employability skills to gain an entry-level job in a high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand field.

    • (A) identify employment opportunities
    • (B) demonstrate the application of essential workplace skills in the career acquisition process
    • (C) complete employment-related documents such as job applications and I-9 and W-4 forms
    • (D) demonstrate proper interview techniques in various situations
    • (E) demonstrate verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic communication skills
    • (F) apply effective listening skills used in the workplace

    (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace.

    • (A) comprehend and model appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace
    • (B) demonstrate dependability, punctuality, and initiative
    • (C) develop positive interpersonal skills, including respect for diversity
    • (D) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace
    • (E) exhibit productive work habits, ethical and occupational safety practices in the workplace
    • (F) demonstrate knowledge of personal and occupational safety practices in the workplace
    • (G) demonstrate the ability to work with the other employees to support the organization and complete assigned tasks
    • (H) prioritize work to fulfill responsibilities and meet deadlines
    • (I) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and personal achievement

    Module Content

    Professionalism is the first unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains six TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Workplace skills
    • B. Workplace expectations
    • C. Organization
    • D. Listening skills
    • E. Proper grooming and attire
    • F. Teamwork

    Refer to Empowering Your Job Skills for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-2/

    Module I Handouts

    A. Workplace skills

    Skills needed to be successful in the hospitality industry will vary depending upon the career chosen. Deciding on what career you will pursue is a major decision and will affect your home and work life.

    Workplace skills include:

    • work habits
    • attitudes
    • maintaining physical and mental health
    • learning to balance multiple roles

    Work habits are the basic, routine actions that you carry out every day at work. They provide the foundation for success and help you become efficient and productive.

    Attitude is the way you look at the world and the way you respond to things that happen.

    Components of a positive attitude include:

    • friendliness
    • self-motivation
    • teamwork
    • adaptability

    Good health is the foundation for everything you do in life and should never be taken for granted.

    In order to stay healthy, try to:

    • get adequate sleep
    • get plenty of physical activity
    • eat a balanced diet
    • avoid health risks
    • maintain mental health

    Many hospitality jobs are stressful. Stress is both emotional and physical.

    Tips for good mental health:

    • take short relaxation breaks during the workday
    • be organized
    • keep a positive attitude
    • express your thoughts and feelings about a situation in a proper way

    B. Workplace expectations

    The hospitality industry is a very busy workplace with people coming and going throughout the day.

    Employers expect employees to:

    • be on time
    • be at work every day
    • call supervisor immediately if you become ill and must miss work
    • complete all work in a timely fashion
    • keep work area neat and organized
    • be accurate
    • report mistakes or problems to your supervisor immediately
    • not make personal calls from work

    C. Organization

    Organizational skills are the skills that enable you to keep your tools and information in order.

    Organization tips include:

    • prepare a to-do list
    • plan your activities
    • prioritize projects
    • delegate duties
    • schedule appointments

    Managers have multiple duties and responsibilities and many employees to supervise; therefore, he/she needs to be an organized leader. The manager must utilize time management techniques to be more productive.

    D. Listening skills

    Listening and speaking are the most basic communication skills.

    Listening is an active process.

    You must:

    • pay attention when you listen to someone
    • focus on the speaker’s face and eyes
    • observe verbal as well as nonverbal communication

    You will use listening skills when:

    • your supervisor or coworkers give instructions or information
    • you interact with customers

    Refer to Service Learning With a Smile: Hospitality and Tourism for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-hospitality-and-tourism/

    E. Proper grooming and attire

    Appearances do count. Your appearance is the first thing that guests, coworkers, and supervisors see.

    Clothing and Shoes

    Be sure that students find out the type of shoes they are to wear for the job. Many hospitality businesses require a uniform and others require formal business dress, such as a business suit. Some businesses are more casual.

    All clothing should be:

    • clean and neat
    • pressed and starched

    Hospitality workers often spend a great deal of time on their feet.

    Shoes should always be:

    • comfortable to wear
    • clean and well maintained
    • professional in appearance

    Hygiene

    Personal hygiene refers to keeping the body and clothes clean.

    Before going to work, students should always:

    • take a bath or shower
    • use deodorant or antiperspirant
    • use a small amount of perfume or cologne
    • brush teeth

    Hair and Nails

    Remind students that hair and nails should be trimmed on a regular basis. For females, clear or natural looking nail polish should be used. For males, many hospitality businesses require that men be clean shaven.

    F. Teamwork

    Teamwork is essential to a job in the hospitality industry.

    Teamwork includes:

    • cooperation
    • ability to work with others
    • commitment to a team and its members

    Cooperation is the willingness to do what it takes to get the job done. A cooperative worker follows instructions and asks questions when he or she does not understand what to do.

    The ability to work with others is someone who is pleasant, agreeable and does not create conflict.

    Commitment means that you feel obligated to do your part for the sake of the team.

    The success of the whole team will depend on:

    • attendance
    • punctuality
    • good attitude
    • skills

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • 25 Key Interview Principles
    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Compare and Contrast SL Articles
    • Empowering Your Job Skills Notes
    • Empowering Your Job Skills Notes (Key)
    • How People Communicate With Each Other
    • Interview Score Sheet
    • Read About Service Learning Leaders
    • Rubric for Service Learning Experience
    • Service Learning in Action
    • Service Learning KWL Chart
    • Service Learning Log
    • Service Learning Quotes
    • Teen Rights Poster
    • The Perfect Service Learner
    • Venn Diagram – Compare and Contrast – Neighborhood vs. School Community

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Divide the class into the four career pathways for Hospitality and Tourism: Restaurants and Food and Beverage Services, Lodging, Travel and Tourism, and Recreation, Amusements, and Attractions. Allow the groups to create a poster depicting the appropriate dress for each of the pathways.
    • Create workplace skills for each of pathways listed above.
    • Discuss the most important aspect of the hospitality industry – Service. Allow students to role-play scenarios depicting different styles of service.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Littrell, J. J., James Lorenz, J. H., Smith H. T. (2009) From school to work. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox.
    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module One Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. How can you recognize someone with a positive attitude?

    • a. friendly
    • b. self-motivated
    • c. adaptable
    • d. all of the above

    2. Your appearance is NOT first thing that guests, coworkers, and supervisors see.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. What might you include on a list about personal hygiene before going to work?

    • a. take a sponge bath, wear cologne or perfume, wear clean clothes
    • b. use deodorant, brush your teeth, wear clean clothes
    • c. take a bath or shower, use deodorant, brush your teeth, wear clean clothes
    • d. take a quick shower, brush your teeth, wear yesterday’s uniform

    4. How would you describe someone who is part of a team?

    • a. has average attendance, is punctual, has a good attitude
    • b. is cooperative, has the ability to work with others, is committed to a team and its members
    • c. is pleasant, agreeable, does not create conflict
    • d. pays attention to detail, has good personal hygiene, wears clean clothes

  • II. The Hospitality Employee

    Smiling African American businessman

    TEKS Addressed

    (3) The student applies work ethics, employer expectations, interaction with diverse populations, and communication skills in the workplace.

    • (A) illustrate how personal integrity affects human relations on the job
    • (B) demonstrate characteristics of successful working relationships such as teamwork, conflict resolution, self-control, and ability to accept criticism
    • (C) analyze employer expectations
    • (D) demonstrate respect for the rights of others
    • (E) demonstrate ethical standards
    • (F) comply with organizational policies and procedures

    (6) The student applies the use of self-development techniques and interpersonal skills to accomplish objectives.

    • (A) identify and practice effective interpersonal and team-building skills involving situations with coworkers, managers, and customers
    • (B) apply leadership and career development skills through participation in activities such as career and technical student organizations

    (7) The student applies concepts and skills related to safety in the workplace.

    • (A) identify and apply safe working practices
    • (B) solve problems related to unsafe work practices and attitudes
    • (C) explain Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations in the workplace
    • (D) analyze health and wellness practices that influence job performance

    (5) The student applies ethical behavior standards and legal responsibilities within the workplace.

    • (B) apply responsible and ethical behavior

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement.

    • (F) determine effective money management and financial planning techniques

    Module Content

    The Hospitality Employee is the second unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Professional Ethics
    • B. Industry standards and procedures
    • C. Safety and health at the workplace
    • D. Personal money management

    Refer to Safety Guidelines – Practicum in Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/safety-guidelines-practicum-in-hospitality-services/

    Refer to lesson What Would You Do? Ethical Behavior Standards for more activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-would-you-do-ethical-behavior-standards-2/

    Module IIa Handouts

    Module IIb Handouts

    Module IIc Handouts

    A. Professional Ethics

    Ethics can be defined as a system of moral values that help people decide right from wrong.

    Ethical behavior is dong the right thing, even under pressure to do the wrong thing. Unethical behavior is doing the wrong thing.

    Ethical qualities include:

    • honesty – tell the truth, even if you may have done something incorrectly
    • integrity – do not let peer pressure change your mind about what you know is right
    • trustworthiness – be reliable; be the type of person who can be trusted with valuables
    • loyalty – keep confidential information confidential
    • fairness – treat everyone equally
    • concern and respect for others – care about fellow employees
    • commitment to excellence – always do your best
    • accountability – be responsible for your actions

    Questions to help with ethical decision making

    • Is it legal?
    • Does it hurt anyone?
    • Is it fair?
    • Am I being honest?
    • Can I live with myself?
    • Would I publicize my decision?
    • What if everyone did it?

    B. Industry standards and procedures

    Every company must have policies and procedures that ensure the safe and efficient running of the company. An employee handbook explains all company policies and procedures concerning employees. Human Resources is responsible for making sure that each employee receives a copy of the handbook and understands it.

    Examples of policies and procedures include:

    • attendance
    • appropriate dress
    • employee conduct
    • personal phone calls
    • smoking

    A discipline policy is used to ensure fair treatment of all employees. Minor problems are handled by the employee’s direct supervisor. Serious problems are covered in the discipline policy.

    Examples of behavior that can result in immediate dismissal include:

    • fighting
    • refusing to follow a supervisor’s instructions
    • consuming or being under the influence of alcohol or illegal substances
    • possession of firearms
    • stealing company property
    • damaging company property
    • violation of safety rules

    C. Safety and health at the workplace

    The major safety law is the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act). The purpose of the OSH Act is to assure safe and healthful working conditions for all workers.

    The major responsibilities of the federal OSHA are to develop mandatory job safety and health standards and to enforce those standards through inspections.

    The hospitality industry is full of chances for employee accidents.

    Accidents include:

    • servers carry heavy trays
    • kitchen staff members work with fire and knives
    • housekeeping staff work with strong chemicals and a variety of equipment
    • banquet staff members move heavy furniture and equipment
    • maintenance staff members work with complex electrical and mechanical equipment

    The most common minor accidents are cuts, falls, and burns. The most common major emergency is fire.

    To extinguish a small fire, view the steps in the video.

    Causes of accidents include:

    • a poor accident prevention plan
    • employee lack of knowledge and skills
    • employee negligence
    • employee fatigue

    Prevention programs should include three areas:

    • rules and policies
    • safety training
    • safety inspections

    Employees should also be alert for possible hazards.

    Possible hazards can include:

    • slippery floors
    • burned out lights
    • blocked fire exits
    • unattended open flame in the kitchen
    • frayed or worn electrical cords
    • objects or equipment left where someone could trip over them

    Employees can prevent two of the major causes of accidents – fatigue and negligence.

    Fatigue is tiredness that can be caused by physical exertion, stress, or lack of sleep.
    Negligence includes behaviors such as carelessness, laziness, ignoring the rules, and improper use of equipment.

    D. Personal money management

    Compensation consists of the money paid and benefits provided to a person for his or her work. Benefits include all forms of compensation other than salary and wages.

    Benefits commonly offered include:

    • paid vacations
    • paid sick days
    • health insurance
    • life insurance
    • disability insurance
    • savings plan
    • retirement plans
    • educational programs
    • wellness programs

    Employees should take advantage of the benefits offered by their company to be able to provide for themselves and their family.

    According to MyMoney.gov,. making the most of your money starts with five building blocks for managing and growing your money — The MyMoney Five.

    Five principles to keep in mind as you make day-to-day decisions and plan your financial goals are:

    • Earn
    • Save and Invest
    • Protect
    • Spend
    • Borrow

    For more information, visit:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IIa Handouts

    Module IIb Handouts

    Module IIc Handouts

    • All About OSHA
    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • KWL for Ethics
    • NIOSH Safety Certificate
    • OSHA at a Glance
    • Preventing Death, Injuries, and Illnesses of Young Workers
    • Rubric for Ethics Skit or Role Play
    • Rubric for Group Safety Video
    • Safety Guidelines Notes
    • Safety Guidelines Notes (Key)
    • Talking Safety Optional Student Handouts
    • Talking Safety Overheads
    • Talking Safety Teacher’s Guide
    • TFER Handwashing Poster
    • USDA and FSIS Ethics and Conflict of Interest
    • What Would You Do Notes
    • What Would You Do Notes (Key)
    • What Would You Do Scenarios
    • Worker’s Rights
    • Workplace Clothing Attire
    • Your Safety Quiz

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Discuss, with your students, ethical situations that may arise while they are at work. Remind them of the ethical guidelines and questions to help with decision-making.
    • Students should review the safety procedures at their place of employment. Have them report back to you with the information.
    • Encourage students to save a percentage of their earned income for emergencies. Discuss what some of these emergencies could be.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    YouTube™:

    Website:

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Two Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. How is ethics related to values?

    • a. helps people decide right from wrong
    • b. everyone is treated equally
    • c. allowing peer pressure to help you make decisions
    • d. there is no relation at all

    2. What conclusion can you determine after reading an employee handbook?

    • a. a copy is kept on a bookshelf in the office
    • b. no one bothers to read it
    • c. explains all company policies and procedures
    • d. small, independent companies don’t need one

    3. What is the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act)?

    • a. to assist employees with filing lawsuits
    • b. to assure safe and healthful working conditions for all workers
    • c. to assist employers in firing negligent workers
    • d. to avoid lawsuits against the government

    4. Benefits include all forms of compensation other than salary and wages. These may include:

    • a. paid vacations, paid sick days, health insurance
    • b. life insurance, disability insurance, savings plan
    • c. retirement plans, educational programs, wellness programs
    • d. some or all of the above

  • III. Hotel Operations and IV. Guest Services

    Empty Hotel Room

    TEKS Addressed – III. Hotel Operations

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (C) compare and contrast full service hotels and limited service properties
    • (D) analyze the differences between chain and franchise hotels

    (11) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry.

    • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary

    Module Content

    Hotel Operations is the third unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Hotel departments
    • B. Types of hotels and properties

    A. Hotel departments

    Each hotel business is different in size and may have many departments or just a few. The larger hotels will have a department for each of the functions.

    Departments may include:

    • Front Office
      • handles all activities involved with guest rooms, making reservations, checking guests in and out, and helping guests while they are on the property
    • Housekeeping
      • prepare rooms for guests and do laundry
      • make sure building furniture, floors, and all public areas are clean
    • Purchasing and Receiving
      • buy the right quality and quantity of supplies at the best price
      • make sure supplies arrive when needed
      • make sure supplies are stored properly once received
      • establish good relationship with suppliers
      • Inventory
    • Management
      • oversee all functions of the business
      • make sure the business is operating profitably and meeting customer needs
    • Marketing and Sales
      • learn what customers want
      • develop marketing plans
      • advertise
      • sell the lodging property
    • Human Resources
      • manage all employee issues including pay, benefits, hiring, firing and training
    • Accounting
      • keep track of all the money that flows into and out of the business
      • monitor costs
      • if costs are running too high, let management know so that costs can be controlled
    • Security
      • prevent harm to business property, employees, guests, and guests’ property
    • Safety and Emergency Procedures
      • make sure the workplace is safe and meets all government safety requirements
      • make sure that plans are in place in case of emergencies
    • Engineering
      • make sure that all equipment, plumbing, electricity, and building facilities are working properly
      • maintenance and groundskeeping

    B. Types of hotels and properties

    Hotels and properties can be organized based on level of service.

    These services include:

    • full-service hotels
      • pride themselves on their high level of service and usually charge the highest prices
      • examples: full-service hotel, convention, luxury, resort, extended stay, condominium
    • limited-service properties
      • focus on lower prices by providing fewer services
      • examples: limited-service hotels, budget hotels
    • specialty accommodations
      • vary in the level of service and may provide shared accommodations and shared bathrooms
      • examples: conference centers, lodges, bed-and-breakfast operations, hostels, campgrounds
    • Institutional housing
      • provides housing for people in schools, universities, hospitals, prisons, and the military
      • examples: institutions, senior housing

    Full service hotels are large and provide many services.

    These services may include:

    • luggage assistance
    • concierge services
    • restaurants (one or more)
    • bar or cocktail lounge
    • room service
    • meeting and banquet facilities
    • spa services
    • recreational facilities

    A convention hotel is designed to provide for the special needs of conventions and trade shows.

    A convention is a large meeting, usually sponsored by a group for its members.
    A trade show is an exhibit during which people who have goods and services to sell showcase their goods and services to potential buyers.

    Luxury hotels provide the highest level of:

    • amenities
    • service
    • room furnishings
    • public spaces
    • technology.

    These hotels provide more:

    • services
    • personal attention to guests
    • elegance

    These types of hotels will charge higher prices to cover their higher level of service.

    Resort hotels cater to vacationers or the leisure traveler.

    Resort hotels provide:

    • entertainment
    • recreation
    • relaxation

    Most resorts are located by:

    • seashores
    • mountains
    • hot springs

    Some resort hotels are located in suburbs or rural areas and add special facilities to attract guests.

    Special facilities include:

    • spas
    • saunas
    • swimming pools
    • exercise and physical fitness equipment

    Resort hotels may also have available on the property:

    • a golf course
    • tennis courts
    • pro shops

    Extended stay hotels offer guests lodging for 5 to 29 days or more. These guests are usually business people who must spend an extended amount of time in a city that is not their home.

    The following article displays pictures and descriptions of the different types of hotels.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students may research the different types of hotels available in their area and create a slide presentation.
    • Invite a hotel manager to speak to the class about his/her career.
    • Print the article on the different types of hotels and assign students to read the article and research local hotels in the community that can be placed in each category.

    References and Resources

    Article:

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Three Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. Which hotel department manages all employee issues, including pay, benefits, hiring, firing and training?

    • a. Human Resources
    • b. Management
    • c. Accounting
    • d. Front Office

    2. Which department oversees all functions of the business?

    • a. Human Resources
    • b. Management
    • c. Accounting
    • d. Front Office

    3. What might you include on a list of hotel services?

    • a. luggage assistance and concierge services
    • b. restaurants and bar or cocktail lounges
    • c. room service and spa services
    • d. some or all of the above

    4. A bed-and-breakfast operation is an example of which type of hotel?

    • a. full-service hotel
    • b. limited-service hotel
    • c. special accommodations
    • d. institutional housing

    Smiling Receptionist

    TEKS Addressed – IV. Guest Services

    (11) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry.

    • (B) explain technical procedures needed to meet guest needs such as registration, rate assignment, room assignment, and determination of payment methods
    • (D) evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
    • (E) determine the correct procedures for check-out, bill payment, and settlement of accounts to ensure guest satisfaction

    Module Content

    Guest Services is the fourth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Check-in procedures
    • B. Current technologies

    A. Check-in procedures

    Check-in consists of many tasks including registration, determining method of payment, and room assignment.

    Registration

    The process of keeping a list of everyone who is staying at the hotel. The front desk agent creates a registration record in the Property Management System (PMS) for each guest.

    The registration record contains information about:

    • the guest’s method of payment
    • the arrival and departure dates
    • any special requests
    • guest’s billing address
    • telephone number

    If a guest has made a reservation, the reservation becomes the registration record.

    Method of Payment
    Once a guest agrees to rent a room, the front desk agent must confirm the guest’s method of payment.

    Methods of payment include:

    • cash
    • personal check
    • debit card
    • credit card

    Room Assignment

    Once the guest has registered and payment method has been confirmed, a room can be assigned. The front desk agent uses the information in the registration record or reservation to assign a room and a room rate for each guest.

    The PMS can quickly give the agent all the information needed to make room assignments and will also show which rooms are available on each date.

    The Americans with Disabilities Act requires new and renovated properties to be barrier-free. Barrier-free means that rooms are designed to meet the needs of persons with disabilities.

    Barrier-free features include:

    • extra-wide doorways for wheelchairs
    • extra-large bathrooms
    • grab bars beside the toilet and inside the bathtub area
    • lowered bathroom vanity counter tops
    • handles on door and bathroom fixtures instead of knobs

    A feature for the hearing impaired is smoke and fire detection systems with strobe lights as well as sound.

    The goal of the front desk office staff is to make the guests’ stay as comfortable and pleasant as possible. In order to achieve this goal, every staff member in the front office must work as a team.

    View the YouTube™ video on the unprofessional front desk agent.

    • “Front Desk First Impressions” Front Desk unprofessional segment
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers).
      http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg

    B. Current technologies

    According to the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AH&LA) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Current and Future Technology Use in the Hospitality Industry (2008) “the most important goal identified by the hoteliers was to use technology to enhance the guest experience.”

    Customers most cared about (in order of importance):

    • Wi-Fi hotspots
    • in-room entertainment systems
    • kiosks for airline check-in and boarding pass printing
    • infrastructure for handheld devices
    • Internet kiosks in the lobby
    • reservations
    • on-line reservations
    • temperature/environment controls in rooms
    • secure DSL and Wi-Fi
    • on-demand (or tank-less) water heaters
    • free wireless throughout the hotel

    Many of these technologies are currently in place at many hotels.

    What else will future technology bring?

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    • Current and Future Technology Use in the Hospitality Industry, (May 2008)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Role play scenarios with students acting as guests, front desk agents, and managers.
    • Be sure to watch the YouTube™ video and point out to students the mistakes the front desk clerk made.
    • Discuss with students what they think the future of technology will be in the hospitality industry. What would they like to see as guests? employees?

    References and Resources

    Article:

    • Current and Future Technology Use in the Hospitality Industry, (May 2008)
      American Hotel and Lodging Association (AH&LA) & University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    YouTube™:

    • “Front Desk First Impressions” Front Desk unprofessional segment
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers).
      http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Four Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. How is the reservation related to the registration card?

    • a. they both contain the same information
    • b. one contains more information than the other
    • c. both are different types of check-in procedures
    • d. they contain public information

    2. What does the Americans with Disabilities Act require?

    • a. rooms be smoke-free
    • b. new and renovated properties to be barrier-free
    • c. electronic keys be provided
    • d. none of the above

    3. According to the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AH&LA) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Current and Future Technology Use in the Hospitality Industry (2008), what did customers most care about?

    • a. Wi-Fi hotspots
    • b. in-room entertainment systems
    • c. kiosks for airline check-in and boarding pass printing
    • d. Internet kiosks in the lobby

  • V. Food and Beverage

    Restaurant Interior

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills.

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (5) The student applies ethical behavior standards and legal responsibilities within the workplace.

    • (B) apply responsible and ethical behavior
    • (E) research laws related to different hospitality services professions

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement.

    • (E) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees

    Module Content

    Food and Beverage is the fifth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains five TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Menu development
    • B. Catering
    • C. Dining service
    • D. Room service
    • E. Responsible beverage service

    A. Menu development

    A menu is a list of food and beverage items served in a food and beverage operation.

    Menus are carefully designed and used for the following purposes:

    • to present food and beverages in an attractive manner that stimulates customers’ appetites
    • to communicate the foodservice operation’s image, prices, and methods of food preparation and service
    • to help the foodservice operation meet financial goals
    • to promote the foodservice operation and encourage repeat business
    • to guide equipment and supply purchases, facility planning, and staffing

    Well-planned menus result in customer satisfaction, success, and profit.

    B. Catering

    Catering is a growing segment of the foodservice industry.

    A caterer does all of the following for a customer:

    • purchases
    • receives
    • stores
    • prepares
    • cooks
    • delivers
    • serves

    Catering is the provision of food and service for a special event and usually involves feeding a large number of people at one time. Guests either all eat the same menu items or have a limited selection.

    Catering for special events can be divided into two groups: business and social.

    Business special events include:

    • conventions
    • business meetings
    • receptions
    • awards dinners
    • company holiday parties

    Social special events include:

    • birthday parties
    • weddings
    • proms
    • anniversaries
    • holiday celebrations
    • graduations
    • reunions
    • charity events

    Catering can also include civic functions.

    Types of catering include:

    • on-site – takes place at the caterer’s place of business
    • off-site – occurs when the function is held away from the caterer’s place of business

    On-site catering may include:

    • banquet hall
    • hotels
    • restaurants
    • private clubs
    • churches

    Off-site catering may include:

    • picnics
    • churches
    • clubs
    • private homes

    For off-site events, caterers must have special trucks or vans that can transport foods safely.

    Caterers can operate from their own home or a separate business location. They may have a large business and several employees or a small business and work by themselves.

    Caterers work with:

    • event coordinators
    • decorators
    • entertainment managers
    • customers

    View YouTube™ video on what caterers do:

    • Catering Business : What Does a Caterer Do?
      A caterer’s job can be as simple as providing food for an event or as involved as providing the food, service, decorations, place settings and chairs for any type of gathering. Understand the job of a caterer with helpful information from a catering chef in this free video on food service.
      http://youtu.be/ToPzmKMu4X0

    C. Dining service

    Different types of dining service appeal to different customers.

    Most common types of dining service include:

    • Fine-dining Restaurants
      • has an environment with excellent food, elegant decor, and superior service
    • Theme Restaurants
      • try to recreate another place or time
    • Casual-Dining Establishments
      • attracts people who like to eat out, but are not interested in a formal atmosphere or high prices
      • examples include:
        • family-style restaurants
        • neighborhood establishments
        • grills and buffets
        • vending machines
    • Quick-Service Restaurants
      • also known as fast food – has limited menus, low prices, and speedy service
    • Catering Services
      • a caterer purchases, receives, stores, prepares, cooks, delivers, and serves food to a customer in another location
      • examples include:
        • contract foodservice
        • airline meals
        • hotel and motel restaurants
        • cruise ship dining

    D. Room service

    Room service is the delivery of food and beverages to guests in their hotel rooms. This department is usually located in the kitchen. Meals are prepared as per the guest either by phone or doorknob menu and delivered at a designated time.

    Meals may be delivered on fancy carts that can be used as a table or served on trays.

    E. Responsible beverage service

    A beverage is a food that is drinkable and can be served before, during, and after a meal.

    Beverages include:

    • coffee
    • tea
    • cocoa
    • soft drinks
    • milk
    • fruit drinks
    • alcoholic drinks

    Alcoholic drinks include:

    • wine
    • beer
    • liquor
    • cocktails

    The U.S. and state governments regulate the sale and consumption of alcohol. All stores and restaurants that sell alcohol must get a liquor license from the state liquor agency. In Texas, that agency is the Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commission (TABC).

    Establishments are prohibited from:

    • serving alcohol to a minor
    • selling alcohol without a license
    • serving alcohol before permitted hours of service
    • serving alcohol after permitted hours of service

    Establishments can face law suits and lose their liquor license.

    One of the major responsibilities of bartenders and beverage servers is to monitor the alcohol consumption by guests and to prevent alcohol-related problems. Establishments can risk

    The policy usually includes:

    • enforcing local and state liquor laws
    • checking identification for anyone who looks younger than 30
    • keeping track of how much alcohol guests have consumed
    • suggesting that guests eat something along with their alcoholic beverages

    All bartenders and beverage servers should be trained to:

    • prevent problems before they occur
    • handle situations in ways that do not create more problems
    • not embarrass guests

    They can risk and employment termination if they serve alcohol to a minor.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Assign students to create a menu for a particular type of restaurant. They must include a theme, design, and food prices.
    • Invite a caterer to speak to the class on the opportunities available in catering, job duties, requirements, and skills needed.
    • Students may research the different types of dining service available in their community, illustrate what types they have visited, and at which type of dining service they would like to work.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    YouTube™:

    • Catering Business : What Does a Caterer Do?
      A caterer’s job can be as simple as providing food for an event or as involved as providing the food, service, decorations, place settings and chairs for any type of gathering. Understand the job of a caterer with helpful information from a catering chef in this free video on food service.
      http://youtu.be/ToPzmKMu4X0

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Five Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. A menu is carefully designed and NOT used for the following purpose:

    • a. to present food and beverages in an attractive manner that stimulates customers’ appetites
    • b. to entice customers to order more food
    • c. to communicate the foodservice operation’s image, prices, and methods of food preparation and service
    • d. to help the foodservice operation meet financial goals

    2. What does a caterer do for a customer?

    • a. purchases and receives the food
    • b. stores and prepares the food
    • c. cooks, delivers, and serves the food
    • d. all of the above

    3. What type of dining is also known as fast food?

    • a. Theme Restaurants
    • b. Quick Service Restaurants
    • c. Casual Dining Establishments
    • d. Catering Services

    4. Most establishment policies include training bartenders and servers serving alcohol to check the identification for anyone who looks younger than _________.

    • a. 18
    • b. 21
    • c. 25
    • d. 30

  • VI. Sales and Marketing and VII. Advertising and Promotion

    Businessman Holding Graph

    TEKS Addressed – VI. Sales and Marketing

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills.

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions.
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement.

    • (C) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in the area of hospitality services

    (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace.

    • (G) demonstrate the ability to work with the other employees to support the organization and complete assigned tasks
    • (H) prioritize work to fulfill responsibilities and meet deadlines
    • (I) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and personal achievement

    Module Content

    Sales and Marketing is the sixth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains six TEA units of study that include:

    • A. The Four “P’s” of marketing
    • B. A Market plan and audit
    • C. Market segments
    • D. Suggestive selling
    • E. Departmental selling
    • F. Forecasting

    A. The Four “P’s” of marketing

    Marketing consists of developing products that meet customer needs and promoting those products so that customers will buy them.

    The four P’s of marketing include:

    • product
    • price
    • place
    • promotion

    Product is anything that a business sells including goods and services.

    Product includes:

    • all activities involved in development
    • deciding what product to sell
    • developing the concept
    • deciding on the general price range

    The exact price to charge must then be decided. Usually the top managers set the prices.

    Setting prices:

    • is a complex task
    • involves knowing costs and profit goals
    • may vary on demand

    The place task of marketing involves where the product will be sold. Location is a key factor in determining the success of a hospitality business.

    Promotion is telling customers about a product or the company that offers it, for purposes of influencing them to buy the product and creating a positive image of the company and the brand.

    Promotion is:

    • the most identified with marketing
    • a very important part of marketing
    • the most visible
    • often the most expensive part of marketing

    View the TedTalks™: video from Seth Godin on marketing:

    • Seth Godin: How to get your ideas to spread
      In a world of too many options and too little time, our obvious choice is to just ignore the ordinary stuff. Marketing guru Seth Godin spells out why, when it comes to getting our attention, bad or bizarre ideas are more successful than boring ones.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_sliced_bread.html

    B. A Market plan and audit

    A marketing plan is a document that lists the marketing goals of the business and describes how these goals will be achieved.

    Marketing plans usually have the following sections:

    • situation analysis – analysis of all factors that could affect the business, such as economic conditions, competitors, and changes in the market
    • goals – a statement of what the business wants to achieve in a specific time period, usually a year
    • strategies – a detailed plan for achieving the goals
    • evaluation – the process of determining whether the strategies achieved the goals

    The business situation analysis includes everything that could affect the business and is sometimes called the business environment.

    Two aspects of the business environment are:

    • the external business environment
    • the internal business environment

    The external business environment includes:

    • influences that are outside the business
    • influences that often cannot be controlled

    Types of external influences include:

    • the status of the economy
    • the political situation
    • government regulations
    • competitors
    • changes in the market

    The internal business environment includes all influences that are inside the business.

    Examples of internal business environment may include:

    • the high rate of employee turnover
    • the location of the business

    Another way of analyzing the business situation is called SWOT.

    SWOT stands for:

    • Strengths
    • Weaknesses
    • Opportunities
    • Threats

    The hospitality business analyzes the internal business environment for strengths and weaknesses and then analyzes the external business environment for opportunities and threats.

    Specific goals based on the business situation will then be developed.

    Examples of goals may include:

    • increase number of customers on slow days
    • advertise in local newspapers
    • develop a promotional plan to include senior citizens
    • sell more rooms to large groups

    In the strategy section, a detailed plan for achieving the goals is given to departments and staff. A timeline and budget is set for each project.

    The final step in the marketing plan is the evaluation. The businesses needs to determine if the marketing plan achieved its goals and if there needs to be changes to be more profitable. The marketing plan will specify times, procedures, and standards for evaluating the marketing plan.

    C. Market segments

    Marketing segments are a subgroup of a larger market with similar needs and wants for the product being sold. Market segmentation is the process of dividing a large market into market segments. The business will choose a segment to focus on and target. The target market is the one whose needs you should strive to meet.

    Market segments may include:

    • age
    • family size
    • activities
    • income

    Age segments might include:

    • children
    • teen
    • adults
    • senior citizens

    Family segments might include:

    • singles
    • couples
    • families with children

    Activity segments might include:

    • business people
    • shoppers
    • sightseers
    • people going to a show (movie, theater, sporting event)

    Income segments might include:

    • low
    • moderate
    • high
    • very high

    A good target market has the following characteristics:

    • it is easy to identify
    • it is large
    • it is able to afford your product
    • it is willing to buy your product

    D. Suggestive selling

    Suggestive selling is recommending additional products or services to a customer while that customer is buying something else. It can significantly increase sales in restaurants that have seated service.

    Many restaurants train servers to use suggestive selling techniques. Servers may recommend appetizers, desserts, wines, and more to their customers.

    E. Departmental selling

    The sales department may be in charge of selling to large groups.

    Job titles for people who work in sales include:

    • salesperson
    • sales representative
    • account executive
    • director of catering
    • banquets manager
    • sales agent or sales manager

    These salespeople sell:

    • banquets
    • catering services
    • meeting rooms
    • convention services
    • exhibition services
    • event planning services

    Sales representatives must have:

    • good people skills
    • friendly attitudes
    • attention to detail

    F. Forecasting

    Forecasting is predicting the number of guests who will stay at the hotel.

    Steps to forecasting in a hotel:

    • the manager collects information by calculating the:
      • number of guests with reservations
      • estimating the number of walk-ins and no-shows, and
      • adding the number of guests already registered
      • calculates the forecast

    This formula, “calculating the forecast,” determines the number of guests expected to check-in and check-out of each day during the next week.
    Managers can use the forecast to determine how many hotel staff will be needed for the week. Ratio of staff to guests affects labor costs and profits.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Divide class into subgroups of three or four and assign students to create a marketing plan for a product they wish to create and sell.
    • Devise a formula for a forecasting worksheet so that students understand the estimating and predicting involved in the hotel industry.
    • Students can create a product and then try to “market” it to their peers. They should keep in mind the market segment and the latest trends.

    References and Resources

    TedTalks™:

    • Seth Godin: How to get your ideas to spread
      In a world of too many options and too little time, our obvious choice is to just ignore the ordinary stuff. Marketing guru Seth Godin spells out why, when it comes to getting our attention, bad or bizarre ideas are more successful than boring ones.
      http://www.ted.com/talks/seth_godin_on_sliced_bread.html

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Six Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. The four P’s of marketing does NOT include:

    • a. presentation
    • b. product
    • c. price
    • d. place

    2. In the TedTalks™ video, Seth Godin says the best way to market your product is:

    • a. “to play it safe”
    • b. “to make sliced bread”
    • c. “add color to your product so that customer’s will purchase it”
    • d. “that you’ve got to figure out a way to get your ideas to spread”

    3. Marketing plans usually have the four sections. Which section is the detailed plan for achieving the goals?

    • a. situation analysis
    • b. goals
    • c. strategies
    • d. evaluation

    4. Suggestive selling significantly increases sales in restaurants that have seated service.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    TV Remote Control

    TEKS Addressed – VII. Advertising and Promotion

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills.

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement.

    • (C) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in the area of hospitality services

    (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace.

    • (G) demonstrate the ability to work with the other employees to support the organization and complete assigned tasks
    • (H) prioritize work to fulfill responsibilities and meet deadlines
    • (I) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and personal achievement

    Module Content

    Advertising and Promotion is the seventh unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains five TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Print advertising
    • B. Electronic advertising
    • C. Media advertising
    • D. Other types of advertising
    • E. Budgeting for advertising

    A. Print advertising

    Advertising is a promotional message about a product that is paid for by an identified sponsor.

    Print advertising consists of ads that appear on paper such as newspapers and magazines.

    Print advertising includes:

    • fliers
    • posters
    • brochures

    Print ads appear in:

    • newspapers
    • magazines
    • fliers
    • posters
    • brochures

    B. Electronic advertising

    Internet advertising usually takes the form of the company website and ads on other websites. These websites enable customers to reserve rooms or order tickets over the Internet.

    Devices used for electronic communication include:

    • computers
    • tablets such as iPads
    • cell phones, smart phones
    • two-way radios

    Email has become an important communication technology. Many hospitality businesses use email to alert their customers to special promotions.

    C. Media advertising

    Commercials are a type of media advertising broadcast on television or radio or the Internet. They are usually used by fast-food restaurants to entice customers with their menu items.

    Social media is online content created by people using highly-accessible publishing technologies. It is usually free and widely popular with almost all consumers.

    Social media includes:

    • Facebook
    • Twitter
    • Instagram
    • Foursquare
    • Google +
    • YouTube

    D. Other types of advertising

    • billboard
      • a type of print advertising that appears on a large, outdoor panel
      • also called outdoor advertising
    • reader board
      • an announcement board located in a hotel lobby and other locations on a lodging property
    • sales call
      • personal visit by a hospitality sales manager to a potential customer
    • sales blitz
      • hotel sales representative sets up a booth in a local office building and promotes hotel

    E. Budgeting for advertising

    According to Roy H. Williams at Entrepreneur.com, there are several steps to take before deciding on a budget for advertisement. Listed below are three steps to begin the process.

    • Step 1: Take 10 percent and 12 percent of your projected annual, gross sales and multiply each by the markup made on your average transaction.
    • Step 2: Deduct your annual cost of occupancy (rent) from the adjusted 10 percent of sales number and the adjusted 12 percent number.
    • Step 3: The remaining balances represent your minimum and maximum allowable ad budgets for the year.

    To read the full article, follow the link below:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Discuss the pros and cons of social media advertising with your students. Do they pay attention to the ads on their Facebook™ and Twitter™ accounts?
    • Display a variety of newspaper and magazine ads to the class. Discuss how the ad appeals to them. What would they do differently? How would they change the colors? background? text?

    References and Resources

    Article:

    Textbook

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Seven Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. _____________is a promotional message about a product that is paid for by an identified sponsor.

    • a. Marketing
    • b. Internet
    • c. Advertising
    • d. Packaging

    2. A personal visit by a hospitality sales manager to a potential customer is called ___________.

    • a. sales call
    • b. sales blitz
    • c. suggestive selling
    • d. promotion

    3. Social media is the latest advertising trend to market a variety of products and information.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • VIII. Event Planning/Meeting Planning

    Business Discussion

    TEKS Addressed

    (11) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry.

    • (C) apply the fundamentals of planning meetings and events

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry.

    • (E) explore the job duties in travel and tourism, recreation, and amusement and attraction venues

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills.

    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    Module Content

    Event Planning and Meeting Planning is the eighth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Exploring job duties
    • B. Hotel events

    A. Exploring job duties

    A hotel may be divided into four large departments. Each department has several employees with different duties.

    Front Office Department includes:

    • Front office manager
      • sells rooms, interact with guests, provide information
    • Reservations agent
      • takes reservations over phone, fax, and Internet
    • Uniformed services
      • helps with luggage and transportation, provide information
    • Telecommunications operator
      • answers phones, direct calls, take messages
    • Front desk agent
      • assists in check-in and check-out, answer questions and requests, help guests

    Housekeeping Department includes:

    • Executive housekeeper
      • keeps hotel and rooms clean and sanitary
    • Guest rooms attendant
      • cleans and sanitizes guest rooms
    • Public Areas Staff
      • cleans public areas such as lobbies and hallways
      • cleans and sanitizes public restrooms
    • Laundry attendant
      • washes laundry, takes care of linens
    • Special cleaning servicee
      • deep cleans (such as carpet cleaning) and special projects such as outside window washing
    • Contract services
      • obtains outside companies for special cleaning tasks such as washing exterior window

    Security Department includes:

    • Director of security
      • protects people, property, and cash
    • Structural security engineer
      • makes sure all security equipment and systems are functioning
    • Security policies staff
      • sets policies and makes sure they are followed
    • Surveillance patrol
      • observes people and places
      • is alert for problems
    • Safety and emergency procedures staff
      • develops safety policies and emergency procedures
      • handles emergencies
    • Records and Investigations officer
      • keeps required records of incidents and emergencies

    Engineering Department includes:

    • Chief engineer
      • keeps equipment and building in good repair
    • Building systems electrician/plumber
      • keeps electrical, plumbing, and other systems in good repair
    • Building and equipment maintenance
      • maintains building, parking lot, elevators, escalators, and kitchen and laundry equipment
    • Guest rooms and public areas custodians
      • handles maintenance problems in these areas
    • Recreational equipment crew
      • maintains swimming pool, hot tubs, and exercise equipment
    • Groundskeeper
      • maintains landscaping and golf courses

    The larger the hotel, the more jobs that are available.

    B. Hotel events

    Many events take place at hotels and can be divided into two categories: business and social.

    Business special events include:

    • conventions
    • business meetings
    • receptions
    • awards dinners
    • company holiday parties

    Social events include:

    • birthday parties
    • weddings
    • proms
    • anniversaries
    • holiday celebrations
    • graduations
    • reunions
    • charity events

    The event planner meets with the client to gather information needed for the event:

    • date of the event
    • time of the event
    • type of event (business meeting, wedding reception)
    • number of guests expected
    • location
    • budget
    • theme or decor preferences
    • type of service (buffet or seated service)
    • additional services or equipment required

    Many large organizations hire a meeting planner to plan, organize, and execute events. In the past, this role was called a party planner but has now expanded into an area of specialization within the industry.

    Meeting planners are responsible for the following duties:

    • selecting the site of the event
    • reserving hotel sleeping rooms
    • reserving meeting and dining rooms
    • arranging for all audiovisual equipment
    • arranging registration, handouts, name tags, door prizes, and seminar packets
    • planning the schedule for participants and their guests
    • coordinating exhibitors and guest speakers for meeting
    • creating floor plans and diagrams
    • arranging for transportation and security

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students can research hotel job duties and create a Glogter™EDU (virtual poster) or a visual display to present to the class.
    • Assign students an event at school to plan – Homecoming Dance, Prom, Winter Ball, Spring Formal. Students will make all the arrangements as listed above with the supervision of the adult sponsor and approval from administration.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Eight Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. What are the duties of the front desk agent?

    • a. sells rooms, interacts with guests, provides information
    • b. takes reservations over phone, fax, and Internet
    • c. assists in check-in and check-out, answer questions and requests, help guests
    • d. answers phones, direct calls, take messages

    2. What person keeps the equipment and building in good repair?

    • a. Front Office Manager
    • b. Chief Engineer
    • c. Groundskeeper
    • d. Director of Security

    3. Events that take place at hotels can be divided into two categories: business and private.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • IX. Purchasing and X. Accounting

    will it be enough?

    TEKS Addressed – IX. Purchasing

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills. The student is expected to:

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (B) develop a personal budget based on career choice
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to
      estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry. The student is expected to:

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue

    Module Content

    Purchasing is the ninth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Technology
    • B. Budgeting
    • C. Teamwork
    • D. Data interpretation


    A. Technology

    The Internet has had a large impact on the hospitality industry as customers can visit websites for their travel and vacation needs.

    The Internet has allowed customers to:

    • book airline flights
    • purchase tickets to movies and concerts
    • order from restaurant menus
    • compare hotel room rates and locations
    • seek employment
    • compare vacation deals
    • reserve rental cars

    To meet these needs, hotels have added Internet connections, wi-fi, wireless connections, computer workstations, and more.

    Computer systems have been integrated into every area of the hospitality business.

    A property management system in hotels can keep track of the following tasks:

    • employee scheduling
    • forecasting customer counts
    • ordering supplies
    • managing inventory
    • collecting sales information
    • keeping financial records

    Point of sale systems are used by restaurants to:

    • record the orders from servers
    • send orders to the kitchen
    • calculate the charges and taxes
    • keep track of items sold and inventory used
    • record the payment
    • generate a customer check

    B. Budgeting

    A budget is a guideline for spending money and are developed by the managers for each of their departments.

    When starting a business, two budgets should be included – a start-up budget and an operating budget.

    A start-up budget accounts for the actual amount of money needed to open the business.

    A start-up budget should include:

    • advertising
    • equipment costs
    • income
    • insurance
    • legal fees
    • licenses or permits
    • payroll expenses
    • salaries
    • supplies
    • utilities

    An operating budget is a projection of how money will be spent when the business is actually open.

    An operating budget should include:

    • depreciation
    • loan payments
    • payroll
    • rent
    • repairs or maintenance
    • taxes

    C. Teamwork

    A co-worker is someone with whom a person works. The ability to get along with others influences success on any job. Employees should have a friendly sincere manner and a willingness to do their share of the work.

    In the hospitality industry, managers often form work teams to solve problems and improve work performance of each employee.

    Teams that work:

    • are inspired by a focus or purpose
    • have measurable, realistic and specific goals
    • are provided with the resources and rewards for the team task
    • are led by a coach or leader who is a team player
    • have five to twelve members (a functioning team is usually a small group)
    • have a variety of personality types with various skills and strengths in the group
    • recognize the time deadline, but still take the time for members to develop personal caring relationships
    • have clear understandable procedures and rules to follow and a sense of mutual accountability

    D. Data interpretation

    The goal of purchasing is to make sure that supplies, equipment, and services are available to the operation in the amounts that are needed.

    Purchasing consists of:

    • developing specifications
      • a detailed description of the product that is needed
    • determining quality
      • U.S. Grade Standards cover the characteristics of food
      • grade of product depends on the use
    • determining quantity
      • par stock is the maximum amount of a particular item that is allowed to be in storage at any one time
      • reorder point is the minimum amount of an item in storage
    • selecting suppliers
      • a business from whom supplies are purchased
      • also called vendors or purveyors
    • ordering
      • a list of products that a business wants to purchase
      • a purchase order is the form used for submitting orders to the supplier

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Brainstorm with students as to what else the Internet will be able to do for us in the future. Students may come up with some predictions that may one day come true.
    • Discuss with the students the importance of budgeting their hard earned money so they understand the value of their money. Create a budget worksheet with columns for income and expenses.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Nine Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. The Internet has allowed customers in the hospitality industry to do the following:

    • a. book airline flights
    • b. purchase tickets to movies and concerts
    • c. seek employment
    • d. all of the above

    2. Hotels can keep track of employee scheduling, forecast customer counts, order supplies, manage inventory, collect sales information, and keep financial records using this system:

    • a. Point of Sales System
    • b. Point of Service System
    • c. Public Management System
    • d. Property Management System

    3. Restaurants use this system to record the orders from servers, send orders to the kitchen, calculate the charges and taxes, keep track of items sold and inventory used, record the payments, and generate a customer check.

    • a. Point of Sales System
    • b. Point of Service System
    • c. Public Management System
    • d. Property Management System

    Calculating Finances

    TEKS Addressed – X. Accounting

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills. The student is
    expected to:

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (B) develop a personal budget based on career choice
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to
      estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments,
    organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry. The
    student is expected to:

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue

    Module Content

    Accounting is the tenth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Data interpretation
    • B. Departmental budgets
    • C. Documents


    A. Data interpretation

    The accounting department is responsible for hotel bookkeeping.

    • Controller
      • supervises the accounting department
      • prepares reports based on the summaries of all daily financial transactions and presents them to the general manager.
      • reports include:
        • daily business reports
        • profit and loss statements
        • balance sheets that show hotel’s income, expenses, payroll, and other statistical information
    • Accounts Receivable
      • is responsible for collecting all money that is owed the hotel as quickly as possible
    • Accounts Payable
      • processes bills that the hotel owes other businesses
    • Auditor
      • analyzes the financial records of the hotel to ensure they are accurate and correct
    • Payroll
      • in charge of wages, salaries, payroll records, issuing paychecks, payroll taxes and wage-and-hour records

    B. Departmental budgets

    Once the budget for the fiscal year is approved, the general manager distributes portions of the budget to the department managers.

    A department’s manager, staff, and the general manager are all responsible for a department’s ability to operate within its budget and produce a projected income.

    The accounting department often works with the managers to develop budgets.

    C. Documents

    Supporting documents can include anything that further describes, clarifies, or supports the information given elsewhere in the business plan.

    Supporting documents may include:

    • bank records
    • examples of marketing tools, such as logos, print advertisements, or menus
    • photos and descriptions of equipment
    • property records for business property
    • statistical information about target audience
    • entrepreneur’s résumé
    • entrepreneur’s financial records, credit report

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students may research the careers and duties for the accounting department and create a presentation.
    • Invite an accountant from a local hospitality business to speak to students about the career.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Ten Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. The accounting department is responsible for hotel bookkeeping. Who is in charge of the accounting department?

    • a. Controller
    • b. Auditor
    • c. General Manager
    • d. Human Services

    2. Who analyzes the financial records of the hotel to ensure they are accurate and correct?

    • a. Controller
    • b. Auditor
    • c. General Manager
    • d. Human Services

  • XI. Housekeeping Management

    Bedroom

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills. The student is
    expected to:

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (B) develop a personal budget based on career choice
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to
      estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments,
    organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry. The
    student is expected to:

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue

    Module Content

    Housekeeping Management is the eleventh unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Inventory and control
    • B. Linen purchases
    • C. Cleaning and room supplies


    A. Inventory and control

    The linen room supervisor or the executive housekeeper is responsible for the linen inventory. They usually have an office in the linen room.

    A property management system (PMS) can be used to to keep linen inventory. The linen room must be locked and only authorized employees are allowed to take supplies out.

    The executive housekeeper must make sure that the housekeeping department has all the supplies it needs.

    Supplies include:

    • linens
    • consumables
    • cleaning supplies

    B. Linen purchases

    Linens need to be replaced periodically.

    Reasons linens should be replaced:

    • normal wear and tear
      • repeated washings will eventually wear out linens
    • improper use
      • employees may use linens as cleaning rags
    • losses in the laundry
      • certain amount of laundry just disappears
    • theft
      • both guests and employees take linens

    C. Cleaning and room supplies

    It is the housekeeper’s job to clean the guest rooms.

    Housekeepers should maintain the hotel’s standards of:

    • cleanliness
    • sanitation
    • appearance

    Housekeepers clean an average of 15 to 16 rooms a day spending 18 to 25 minutes in each room.

    Housekeepers must perform the following tasks in each room:

    • empty trash
    • dust all furniture
    • clean mirrors
    • change sheets and make beds
    • vacuum carpet
    • clean and sanitize the bathroom
    • provide guest room supplies

    Most properties supply the following consumables:

    • toilet paper
    • facial tissue
    • small bars of soap
    • notepad and pen

    Guest rooms with coffee makers are supplied with:

    • packets of ground coffee
    • sugar
    • powdered creamer

    Full-service hotels may supply guest rooms with additional toiletries such as:

    • shampoo
    • hair conditioner
    • moisturizing lotion
    • mouthwash
    • disposable shower cap
    • shoe shine cloth

    View the housekeeping video for the role of housekeepers:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Ask students how long it takes them to clean their room at home. Do they clean and sanitize their bathrooms? Make the beds neatly? Students can investigate the steps the housekeeper takes to clean a guest room.
    • Students may take a tour of the housekeeping department of a local hotel to see how the department runs.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    YouTube™:

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Eleven Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. The executive housekeeper is responsible for the linen inventory and making sure the department has all the cleaning supplies needed.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    2. Linens need to be replaced periodically due to:

    • a. normal wear and tear
    • b. losses in the laundry
    • c. theft
    • d. all of the above

    3. On the average, how many rooms does a housekeeper usually clean?

    • a. 19 to 20 rooms
    • b. 15 to 16 rooms
    • c. 20 to 25 rooms
    • d. 30 rooms

  • XII. Human Relations and Ethics

    Gavel and Law Books

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace. The student is expected to:

    • (E) exhibit productive work habits, ethical practices, and a positive attitude

    (3) The student applies work ethics, employer expectations, interaction with
    diverse populations, and communication skills in the workplace. The student is
    expected to:

    • (A) illustrate how personal integrity affects human relations on the job
    • (B) demonstrate characteristics of successful working relationships such
      as teamwork, conflict resolution, self-control, and ability to accept criticism
    • (C) analyze employer expectations
    • (D) demonstrate respect for the rights of others
    • (E) demonstrate ethical standards

    (4) The student applies academics with career readiness skills. The student is
    expected to:

    • (D) organize and compose workplace business documents

    (5) The student applies ethical behavior standards and legal responsibilities
    within the workplace. The student is expected to:

    • (A) research and compare published workplace policies
    • (B) apply responsible and ethical behavior
    • (C) summarize provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act
    • (D) describe the consequences of breach of confidentiality
    • (E) research laws related to different hospitality services professions

    Module Content

    Human Relations and Ethics is the twelfth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Work habits
    • B. Positive attitude
    • C. Job-labor laws

    Refer to Skills for Success in the Workplace for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/skills-for-success-in-the-workplace/

    Module XII Handouts


    A. Work habits

    Work habits are the basic, routine actions that you carry out every day at work. They provide the foundation for success.

    Good work habits include:

    • being on time
    • being at work every day
    • calling your supervisor immediately if you become ill and must miss work
    • completing all work in a timely fashion
    • keeping your work area neat and organized
    • being accurate
    • reporting mistakes or problems to your supervisor immediately
    • not making personal calls from work

    Can you think of any others?

    B. Positive attitude

    Attitude is the way you look at the world and the way you respond to things that happen. Guests and coworkers want to be around people with positive attitudes.

    Positive attitude includes:

    • friendliness
    • self-motivation
    • teamwork
    • adaptability

    A friendly attitude consists of a positive attitude toward yourself and others.

    Friendly people are generally:

    • pleasant
    • cheerful
    • optimistic

    Self-motivation is the inner urge to achieve your goals.

    Self-motivation includes:

    • a sense of enthusiasm about your work
    • having initiative – coming up with new ideas and ways to solve problems

    An attitude of teamwork is essential to success on the job.

    An attitude of teamwork includes:

    • cooperation
    • the ability to work with others
    • commitment to the team and its members

    Adaptability is the ability to make changes to match new situations. The workplace is constantly changing in the hospitality industry with new challenges and problems to solve. An adaptable person adjusts to changes and new conditions smoothly.

    C. Job-appropriate labor laws

    Laws are society’s rules for proper behavior.

    Federal agencies that affect the hospitality industry include:

    • Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
    • Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
    • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)
    • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

    Hiring and Employment Laws:

    • Equal Opportunity
      • Civil Rights Act, 1964, 1991
        • bans employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin
        • allows jury trials and punitive damages in discrimination cases
      • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
        • investigates charges of discrimination
      • Age Discrimination Employment Act
        Older Workers Benefit Protection Act, 1967, 1990
        • bans discrimination against workers age 40 and older
      • Immigration Reform and Control Act, 1986
        • bans employment of noncitizens who are not authorized to work in the U.S.
        • bans discrimination against citizens who may appear foreign
        • bans discrimination against noncitizens who have legal work permits
      • Americans with Disabilities Act, 1990
        • bans discrimination against individuals with disabilities in matters of employment, government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities, and transportation
    • Workers’ Rights
      • Fair Labor Standards Act, 1938
        • main provisions:
          • minimum wage
          • overtime pay
          • restrictions on employment of children
          • record keeping
      • Equal Pay act, 1963
        • men and women must be paid equal amounts if they are doing the same job or substantially similar jobs
      • Family and Medical Leave Act, 1993
        • entitles eligible employees up to 12 weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave in a12-month period for specified family and medical reasons
    • Taxes
      • Internal Revenue Code
        • governs income taxes
      • Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA)
        • Social Security ensures that all workers will get some income after they retire
      • Federal Unemployment Tax Act
        • requires employers to contribute a certain amount of money for each employee into an unemployment fund

    Worker Safety Laws:

    • Occupational Safety and Health Act, 1970
      • requires employers to protect the safety and health of their workers
    • Occupational Safety and Health Administration
      • develops regulations based on the act and then enforces the regulations

    Food Safety Laws:

    • Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, 1906, 1967, 1997
      • requires that food, drugs, and cosmetics sold to the public be proven safe and effective
    • Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
      • enforces regulations based on the act

    Environmental Protection Laws:

    • National Environmental Policy Act, 1969
      • main law to maintain quality of environment
      • other laws include:
        • clean air
        • clean water
        • safe drinking water
        • cleaning up toxic wastes
        • protecting endangered species
        • protection from pesticides and other toxic substances
        • food quality protection
        • occupational safety
    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
      • lead environmental agency to make and enforce environmental regulations

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module XII Handouts

    • Rubric for Weekly Intern Rotation Log
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 1
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 2
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 3
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 4
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 5
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log 6
    • Weekly Intern Rotation Log Template

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students can research the federal laws that oversee worker’s rights and create a Prezi™ or PowerPoint™ to present the information to the class.
    • Students can create a timeline depicting the years laws came into effect.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Twelve Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. Work habits are the basic, routine actions that you carry out every day at work. They provide the foundation for success. Good work habits include the following EXCEPT:

    • a. calling in sick to spend time with your friends
    • b. being on time
    • c. being at work every day
    • d. calling your supervisor immediately if you become ill and must miss work

    2. Which federal law bans discrimination against workers age 40 and older?

    • a. Fair Labor Standards Act, 1938
    • b. Equal Pay act, 1963
    • c. Older Workers Benefit Protection Act, 1967, 1990
    • d. Americans with Disabilities Act, 1990

    3. Which law oversees minimum wage, overtime pay, restrictions on employment of children, and record keeping?

    • a. Fair Labor Standards Act, 1938
    • b. Equal Pay act, 1963
    • c. Older Workers Benefit Protection Act, 1967, 1990
    • d. Americans with Disabilities Act, 1990

  • XIII. Travel Venues

    Beach Chairs Watching Ocean

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments,
    organizations, and the larger environment of the hospitality services industry. The
    student is expected to:

    • (A) explain the different types and functions of departments
    • (B) perform duties in each of the departments of a hotel or tourism venue
    • (E) explore the job duties in travel and tourism, recreation, and
      amusement and attraction venues

    Module Content

    Travel Venues is the thirteenth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Convention sites
    • B. Vacation destinations


    A. Convention sites

    A convention is a large meeting that is usually sponsored by a professional organization or group. Some hotels host a meeting for thousands of people that may last several days. These hotels must have a great amount of space set aside for meeting rooms, and the size and arrangement of meeting rooms must be flexible.

    The hotel is considered full service if it has a food and beverage operation to provide meals and refreshments for meetings.

    Hotel services provided to conventions may include:

    • projection screens
    • projectors
    • wireless internet
    • wi-fi
    • speaker systems
    • an I T person for assistance

    A convention may host:

    • banquets
    • business meetings
    • awards ceremonies
    • receptions
    • networking and socializing

    B. Vacation destinations

    A vacation is a period of time during which a person rests and is free from daily obligations, such as work and school. People often travel during their vacations.

    Some people travel to visit:

    • historical sites
    • natural wonders

    Others travel for romantic reasons such as a honeymoon.

    People travel to:

    • rest
    • read
    • ski
    • snorkel
    • hike

    Families often like to travel to visit relatives, go camping, or pursue hobbies.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Ask students to write a report on the best vacation they have ever taken. Who were they with? Where did they go? What did they do?
    • Students enrolled in SkillsUSA or FCCLA may attend a conference at a convention site. Senior students who have competed may describe the experience to other students and encourage them to compete.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Hospitality services. In (2001). Hospitality Services Reference Book. Lubbock: The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Thirteenth Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. Hotel services provided to conventions may include:

    • a. projectors and projection screens
    • b. wireless internet or wi-fi
    • c. speaker systems and an I T person for assistance
    • d. all of the above

    2. A vacation is a period of time during which a person rests and is free from daily obligations.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • XIV. Career Advancement and End of Course Project Options Lesson/Course Outline

    Picture1

    TEKS Addressed

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career
    retention and advancement. The student is expected to:

    • (A) analyze the future employment outlook in the occupational area
    • (B) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the hospitality services area
    • (D) evaluate strategies for career retention and advancement in response
      to the changing global workplace

    (9) The student identifies skills and attributes necessary for professional
    advancement. The student is expected to:

    • (A) evaluate employment options, including salaries and benefits
    • (B) determine factors that affect career choices such as personal interests,
      abilities, priorities, and family responsibilities
    • (C) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career
      advancement and promote lifelong learning
    • (D) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate
      employment

    (12) The student documents technical knowledge and skills. The student is
    expected to:

    • (A) complete a professional portfolio to include:
      • (i) an updated resumé
      • (ii) official documentation of attainment of technical skill competencies,
        licensures, or certifications
      • (iii) recognitions, awards, and scholarships
      • (iv) community service hours
      • (v) student organization participation
      • (vi) practicum supervisor evaluations

    Module Content

    Career Advancement is the fourteenth unit of study in the Practicum in Hospitality Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Professional portfolio
    • B. Retention and advancement
    • C. Entrepreneurial opportunities

    Refer to Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/maximize-your-job-search-with-a-career-portfolio/

    Refer to Careers in the Hospitality Industry: Connecting Education and Employment for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-the-hospitality-industry-connecting-education-and-employment/

    Refer to Show Yourself Off! Write a RÉSUMÉ! for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/show-yourself-off-write-a-resume-3/

    Module XIV Handouts

    A. Professional portfolio

    A portfolio is a well organized collection of materials that supports your job qualifications. It can be used during an interview to show an employer examples of your talents and capabilities.

    A portfolio should include:

    • a cover sheet
      • listing contents of portfolio in outline form
      • job-related skills
    • a letter of application
    • a copy of your latest résumé
    • collection of your best work specifically related to the job you seek.
    • certificates of completion and awards
    • photographs and a written description of community service projects

    Portfolio order may be:

    • organized according to completion dates
    • groupings of similar projects or themes

    Update your portfolio on a regular basis by adding new items and replacing others.

    B. Retention and advancement

    Retention
    Employee retention refers to the efforts made to keep good employees and reduce turnover.

    Turnover occurs when an employee leaves the company and another employee must be hired to take his or her place. It can be very expensive for the business.

    Turnovers can occur when:

    • a worker is promoted within the company
    • employees move away
    • employees leave for a variety of personal reasons
    • employees are unhappy with their jobs
    • a competing company offers much better wages or benefits or working conditions

    Some of the functions of Human Resources are:

    • make the workplace as positive as possible
    • research wages to make sure the business offers a competitive wage
    • research the benefits other companies offer
    • work to develop wages, benefits, and other programs that will keep employees happy

    The Human Resources department often develops quality of work life programs to help retain employees.

    Quality of work life (QWL) is a concept that refers to how the worker feels about the work experience itself.

    Common QWL programs include:

    • courses on stress management
    • financial planning
    • wellness programs
    • health club membership
    • health screenings

    Advancement
    One of the most important advantages of a hospitality career is the opportunity for quick advancement. Advancement depends on your willingness to learn and work hard. Employers are often willing to train employees who show promise to become a valuable employee.

    Learning never stops. If you want to advance in your career, active steps must be taken.

    Active steps may include:

    • continuing education
    • developing leadership skills
    • being active in professional organizations
    • changing jobs

    In the hospitality industry, the following requires new learning:

    • new technology
    • new products
    • new procedures
    • new trends and changes in customer wants and needs

    C. Entrepreneurial opportunities

    Entrepreneurship is taking the risk of starting a new business. An entrepreneur is a person who takes that risk.

    Characteristics of successful entrepreneurs:

    • high energy level
    • like to work hard
    • self-confident
    • creative
    • goal-oriented
    • strong desire to have control over their work lives
    • strong motivation to succeed
    • willing to work when others play

    Advantages of entrepreneurship:

    • you are the boss
    • you might make a lot of money
    • you determine your work schedule
    • you hire the people you want

    Disadvantages of entrepreneurship:

    • you are responsible for everything
    • you might suffer large financial loss
    • income can be uncertain or irregular
    • you will work long hours

    Ways to start a business include:

    • buy an existing business
    • buy a franchise
    • start from scratch with an idea, product and/or vision

    Advantages to buying an existing business:

    • the business already has:
      • customers
      • employees
      • a location
      • business equipment
      • working business operations
      • financial records that describe its financial history

    The main disadvantage to buying an existing business is that you may be buying problems or the business is not making a profit.

    Advantages to buying a franchise include:

    • you have an established product or service with an established reputation
    • the franchisor provides assistance with many of the aspects of starting and running the business
    • quantity purchasing by placing orders for supplies with other franchisees reducing the cost

    Disadvantages to owning a franchise include:

    • the franchisor makes many of the decisions
    • the franchisee must follow the rules and requirements set by the franchisor
    • the initial cost to buy a franchise is high
    • must also pay a franchise fee
    • the franchisor can terminate the franchise agreement for any number of reasons
    • the franchisee loses all of his or her investments

    Advantages of starting your own business includes:

    • you get to make all the decisions
    • you decide on:
      • product
      • service
      • location
      • concept
      • whom to hire
      • what hours to be open
      • what the decor should be
    • you get all the profits

    The disadvantage to starting your own business is that you take on all the risk. For a new business, be sure to do enough market research and financial planning to make sure the business will be financially sound.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module XIV Handouts

    • 25 Key Interview Principles
    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Are You a Teen Worker?
    • Basic Information for a Résumé
    • Career Portfolio Service Learning Log
    • Chronological Résumé Template
    • Competive Sports Athlete (PDF and Excel)
    • Education and Training in the Hospitality Industry
    • Employment Application
    • Employment in the Hospitality Industry
    • Employment in the Hospitality Industry (Key)
    • Employment Opportunities in Your Area
    • Employment Portfolio Project
    • Empowering Your Job Skills Notes
    • Empowering Your Job Skills Notes (Key)
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Form W-4 (2013)
    • Functional Résumé Template
    • Hosp – Chef Head Cook (PDF and Excel)
    • Hosp – Food and Beverage Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Hosp – Lodging Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Hosp – Travel and Tourism (PDF and Excel)
    • Interview Score Sheet
    • My Representation of My Portfolio
    • Practicum in Hospitality Services ONet Flashcards
    • Recreations Attractions Manager (PDF and Excel)
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Rubric for Electronic Glogster ™ EDU Career Poster
    • Rubric for Employment E-Portfolio Project
    • Rubric for Employment Portfolio Project Binder
    • Rubric for Résumé
    • Show Yourself Off! Write a Résumé Notes
    • Steps to Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio
    • Steps to Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio (Key)
    • Teen Rights Poster

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students can continue to add to their portfolio as they continue in high school. If a portfolio has not been started, be sure to encourage students to begin one.
    • Discuss retention and advancement in the hospitality industry. Encourage students to remain on the job as long as possible to gain valuable experience. This may lead to advancement.
    • There are so many possibilities for new businesses everywhere. Begin a discussion with your students to see if they would like to start a business. If so, what type? What would they sell? How would they market their business? Be sure to ask other questions to keep the discussion progressing.

    References and Resources

    Textbook:

    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Module Fourteen Pre-Assessment Quiz

    1. A _______________ is a well organized collection of materials that supports your job qualifications. It can be used during an interview to show an employer examples of your talents and capabilities.

    • a. résumé
    • b. portfolio
    • c. job application
    • d. reference notebook

    2. Turnover occurs when an employee leaves the company and another employee must be hired to take his or her place. It is NOT expensive for the business because it can hire new employees at minimum wage.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. Advancement in the hospitality industry depends on your willingness to:

    • a. work everyday
    • b. be friendly with the boss
    • c. work only the hours assigned
    • d. learn and work hard

    4. One disadvantage of entrepreneurship is:

    • a. you might make a lot of money
    • b. you will work long hours
    • c. you determine your work schedule
    • d. you hire the people you want

    An excellent way to end the semester or school year is with a culminating course project. See End of Course Project Options Lesson for Practicum in Hospitality Services.

    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/end-of-course-project-options-practicum-in-hospitality-services/

    Culminating activities at the end of the course give students an opportunity to reflect and apply all of their knowledge and skills into an end of course project.

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Course Outline
    The lessons in this course may be used in any sequence. The suggested sequence order is based on the Scope and Sequence for the course.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/2013/02/10/practicum-in-hospitality-services-course-outline/

  • Quiz

    Practicum in Hospitality Services Online Course

    Progress:

    1. How can you recognize someone with a positive attitude?

    2. Your appearance is NOT the first thing that guests, coworkers, and supervisors see.

    3. What might you include on a list about personal hygiene before going to work?

    4. How would you describe someone who is part of a team?

    5. How is ethics related to values?

    6. What conclusion can you determine after reading an employee handbook?

    7. What is the purpose of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act)?

    8. Benefits include all forms of compensation other than salary and wages. These may include:

    9. Which hotel department manages all employee issues, including pay, benefits, hiring, firing and training?

    10. Which department oversees all functions of the business?

    11. What might you include on a list of hotel services?

    12. A bed-and-breakfast operation is an example of which type of hotel?

    13. How is the reservation related to the registration card?

    14. What does the Americans with Disabilities Act require?

    15. According to the American Hotel and Lodging Association (AH&LA) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) *Current and Future Technology Use in the Hospitality Industry (2008),* what did customers most care about?

    16. What does a caterer do for a customer?

    17. What type of dining is also known as fast food?

    18. A menu is carefully designed and NOT used for the following purpose:

    19. Most establishment policies include training bartenders and servers serving alcohol to check the identification for anyone who looks younger than _________.

    20. The four P's of marketing does NOT include:

    21. In the TedTalks(TM) video, Seth Godin says the best way to market your product is:

    22. Marketing plans usually have the four sections. Which section is the detailed plan for achieving the goals?

    23. Suggestive selling significantly increases sales in restaurants that have seated service.

    24. _____________is a promotional message about a product that is paid for by an identified sponsor.

    25. A personal visit by a hospitality sales manager to a potential customer is called ___________.

    26. Social media is the latest advertising trend to market a variety of products and information.

    27. What are the duties of the front desk agent?

    28. What person keeps the equipment and building in good repair?

    29. Events that take place at hotels can be divided into two categories: business and private.

    30. The Internet has allowed customers in the hospitality industry to do the following:

    31. Hotels can keep track of employee scheduling, forecast customer counts, order supplies, manage inventory, collect sales information, and keep financial records using this system:

    32. Restaurants use this system to record the orders from servers, send orders to the kitchen, calculate the charges and taxes, keep track of items sold and inventory used, record the payments, and generate a customer check.

    33. The accounting department is responsible for hotel bookkeeping. Who is in charge of the accounting department?

    34. Who analyzes the financial records of the hotel to ensure they are accurate and correct?

    35. The executive housekeeper is responsible for the linen inventory and making sure the department has all the cleaning supplies needed.

    36. 2. Linens need to be replaced periodically due to:

    37. On the average, how many rooms does a housekeeper usually clean?

    38. Work habits are the basic, routine actions that you carry out every day at work. They provide the foundation for success. Good work habits include the following EXCEPT:

    39. Which federal law bans discrimination against workers age 40 and older?

    40. Which law oversees minimum wage, overtime pay, restrictions on employment of children, and record keeping?

    41. Hotel services provided to conventions may include:

    42. A vacation is a period of time during which a person rests and is free from daily obligations.

    43. A _______________ is a well organized collection of materials that supports your job qualifications. It can be used during an interview to show an employer examples of your talents and capabilities.

    44. Turnover occurs when an employee leaves the company and another employee must be hired to take his or her place. It is NOT expensive for the business because it can hire new employees at minimum wage.

    45. Advancement in the hospitality industry depends on your willingness to:

    46. One disadvantage of entrepreneurship is:

    47. CTE stands for:

    48. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    49. TEKS stands for:

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with:

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