Practicum in Education and Training Online Course

  • Practicum in Education and Training Online Course Introduction

    Practicum in Education and Training is a field-based internship that provides students background knowledge of child and adolescent development principles as well as principles of effective teaching and training practices.

    Students in the course work under the joint direction and supervision of both a teacher with knowledge of early childhood education and exemplary educators in direct instructional roles with elementary, middle school, and high school-aged students. Students learn to plan and direct individualized instruction and group activities, prepare instructional materials, assist with record keeping, make physical arrangements, and complete other responsibilities of classroom teachers, trainers, paraprofessionals, or other educational personnel.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Practicum in Education and Training is one of 4 courses in the Education and Training career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Important

    This online course consists of an introduction and eleven modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, and slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with seven multiple choice questions.

    Be sure to open all the attachments below that correspond to this course as you will need to refer to them as you follow along. All of the handouts and graphic organizers are available for you to use in your classroom.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com


    NOTE
    From the State Board of Education Certification
    Figure: 19 TAC §231.1(e)
    ASSIGNMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL PERSONNEL, PART I
    REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSIGNMENT OF TEACHERS

    • The school district is responsible for ensuring that each teacher assigned to this course has completed appropriate training in state and federal requirements regarding work-based learning and safety. This requirement is effective beginning with the 2010-2011 school year.

    This online course DOES NOT fulfill SBOE requirements but does serve as professional development for six (6) Continuing Professional Education Credits.

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Practicum in Education and Training
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-practicum-in-education-and-training/ for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, programs of study and this course.

  • I. Course Introduction/Exploring Teaching and Training

    TEKS Addressed

    • (1) The student explores the teaching and training profession.
      • (A) assess personal characteristics needed to work in the teaching and training profession
      • (B) explore school based on qualities of effectiveness
      • (C) formulate a personal philosophy of education

    Module Content

    Exploring Teaching and Training is the course introduction and first unit of study in the Practicum in Education and Training course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:
    —-
    A. Course Introduction
    B. Personal Characteristics Needed
    C. Philosophy

    —-

    Refer to lesson Empowering Your Job Skills for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-3/

    Refer to lesson Communicating with Parents for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/communicating-with-parents/

    Refer to lesson What a Wonderful Teacher You Will Be for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-a-wonderful-teacher-you-will-be/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson How Do I Get That Job? Education Administration for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/how-do-i-get-that-job-education-administration-2/

    Refer to lesson Philosophy of Education for additional activites, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/philosophy-of-education/

    Module I Handouts

    A. Course Introduction

    By the time students are in high school, they have been in the educational system for most of their lives. They have been involved in the exploration of teaching and training careers as they have moved through elementary, junior high and high school. If they are taking Practicum in Education and Training, they have been influenced by teachers and are considering the teaching and training profession for themselves.

    As seniors, they are making choices about their future. They are trying to decide what to be and how to prepare for that choice. This course is an excellent opportunity for them to reflect on their experiences, consider their abilities and qualities to decide if they want to pursue a career in the teaching and training field.

    If students have completed other courses in the Education and Training cluster, they know that there are many types of training careers in addition to public school classroom teaching. Many of the skills and abilities needed to be successful are similar in each area; however, each type of teacher and trainer also has unique and specific types of preparation and skills. In Practicum in Education and Training, students will review much of the information they have acquired in other Education and Training classes and have opportunities to apply their knowledge and skills in internships.

    B. Personal Characteristics Needed

    There is not one specific quality or characteristic that guarantees success in teaching. When students recall best-liked teachers, they recall such qualities as being fair, caring, empathetic, and understanding. When they remember least-liked teachers, they list characteristics such as boring, unfair, uncaring, rude and others. Students do have memories tied to strong emotions about these teachers. Teachers do make an important and long-lasting impact on their students. It is important for students considering a career as a teacher to analyze their personal characteristics and identify personal strengths and weaknesses.

    Personal characteristics that successful teachers and trainers might possess might include:

    • Caring
    • Confident
    • Consistent
    • Patient
    • Warm
    • Fair
    • Good Listener
    • Prepared
    • Positive
    • Enthusiastic
    • Alert
    • Stimulating
    • Technologically Capable
    • Risk Taker
    • Have high personal standards
    • Moral
    • Motivating
    • Respectful
    • Resourceful
    • Organized
    • Creative
    • Works well with others and independently
    • Possess emotional intelligence

    It can be difficult for students to “assess” their strengths and weaknesses. Assess means to evaluate the characteristics one possesses. Some students will be able to identify their personal characteristics. It is helpful to provide ways for them to analyze their strengths and search for strategies to improve in areas where they are weak. The handout Personal Characteristics Assessment will give students an opportunity to assess themselves.

    Personality assessments help provide an insight into people’s work styles and behavior. They are used as part of recruitment and development processes to help employers select the best people. Personality is related to job performance, motivation, absenteeism, and job satisfaction. Teachers can check with the school counselor for assessments that are available for students.
    —-
    C. Philosophy

    A philosophy of education is an explanation of basic beliefs about education. It is based on a person’s philosophy of life. Your beliefs influence your actions. Your personal belief system, including your philosophy of education, will determine what values you emphasize, how you organize and manage your classroom, how you teach, and how you relate to children and their families. Your philosophy guides your thinking and actions as a teacher.

    The philosophy of education could include the student’s responses to the following questions:

    • What is the role of the school in society?
    • What is the role of the teacher?
    • What is the student’s role in education?
    • How can teachers serve all students well?
    • How will the teacher choose curriculum and teaching strategies?
    • How will the teacher prepare students for various tests, such as STAAR?
    • What classroom management strategies will be used?
    • How will the teacher accommodate students with limited English skills?
    • How will the teacher serve students with special needs?
    • What qualities are important for teachers to possess?

    To prepare a philosophy of education, students should read a wide variety of information, including historical perspectives and contemporary issues and trends. They need to reflect about their past experiences, successes, and obstacles. They should talk with other teachers and students to obtain opinions and views. It helps to review notes and assignments from previous classes in Education and Training.

    Before actually writing the philosophy, it helps if students make an outline. Encourage students to be specific, use quotes and examples as they explain their ideal vision of education.

    When students prepare the draft, remind them to include a thesis statement, correct grammar and spelling. They should also proofread for correct grammar and spelling. If they plan to become a teachers, their writing should reflect that they are an educated person. It is a work in progress that will change as they have more experiences with education and teaching.

    Students should begin their philosophy of education early in the year so they can adjust and revise it as they participate in their intern experiences. The completed philosophy should be an important part of their portfolio and senior presentation. This is an excellent time for students to incorporate technology by creating a video for YouTube, blog or other innovative expression of their philosophy.

    View the following short YouTube™ philosophy of education presentation:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ziNyAHgfZyY

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module I Handouts

    • Career Research – Education Administration
    • Career Research – Educational Support Staff
    • Issues and Trends in Education
    • Job Description of Careers
    • Job Shadowing Project Rubric
    • Job Shadowing Project
    • KWL Chart Education Administration
    • KWL Chart Philosophy of Education
    • KWL Chart Support Staff
    • My Philosophy of Education Rubric
    • My Philosophy of Education
    • Note Taking Support Staff Creating a Strong Learning Community
    • Personal Characteristics Assessment
    • Philosophy of Education Note-Taking
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition (Key)
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Competition (Key)
    • TAFE Exploring Education Administration Careers Competition
    • TAFE Exploring Professional Support Services Careers Competition
    • Teaching Philosophy Template

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Interview the best teachers students have had. This could be in person, by email, or Skype. Students could prepare a Power Point, video, or other creative presentation of the qualities that teacher possessed. Videos could be posted on YouTube.
    • Survey students of various ages, teachers, parents, and administrators about characteristics teachers should possess. Compare the data and make graphs to compare information from various groups.
    • Research emotional intelligence and ways to develop those attributes. Make presentations using technology to share the information with the class. Role play examples of scenarios of teachers using emotional intelligence strategies.
    • Do debates using issues and trends in education from the graphic organizer Issues in Education Administrators and other teachers could be invited to participate in a panel discussion of the trends they predict.
    • Work individually and then in small groups to make lists of school based qualities of effectiveness. Make a class list. Go to the school web site to find and make a copy of the District and Campus School Improvement Plan. Compare their class list to the ideas in the school documents. They may make a list of suggestions for the school principal or Improvement Plan Committees.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    YouTube™

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Assess is

    • a. asking for help
    • b. another word for test
    • c. to evaluate
    • d. explaining

    2. Personality can effect

    • a. job performance, motivation
    • b. absenteeism, job satisfaction
    • c. eligibility for annual leave
    • d. a and b

    3. To prepare a philosophy of education, students need to

    • a. read about education, past and present
    • b. model their philosophy after Piaget
    • c. interview other teachers
    • d. a and c

    4. A philosophy

    • a. is an explanation of basic beliefs about education
    • b. a justification of high stakes testing
    • c. an analysis of educational theory
    • d. why No Child Left Behind was created

    5. A teacher’s philosophy of education

    • a. guides how they manage their classroom
    • b. explains why they deserve a higher salary
    • c. how they relate to children and their families
    • d. a and c

    6. Characteristics of teachers are

    • a. different for different types of teachers
    • b. the same for all good teachers
    • c. important to assess
    • d. a and c

    7. The one characteristic that guarantees success in teaching is

    • a. creativity
    • b. sense of humor
    • c. dedication
    • d. there is not one characteristic that guarantees success in teaching

  • II. Communication Skills

    TEKS Addressed

    • (3) The student communicates effectively.
      • (A) assess the effectiveness of personal verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication skills
      • (D) integrate effective communication skills in teaching or training
      • (C) evaluate the role of classroom communications in promoting student literacy and learning
    • (5) The student creates and maintains an effective learning environment.
      • (D) demonstrate specific conflict management and mediation techniques supportive of an effective learning environment

    Module Content

    Communication skills is the second unit of study in the Practicum in Education and Training Course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Types
      • 1. Verbal
      • 2. Non-verbal
      • 3. Written
      • 4. Electronic
    • B. Teacher Communication
    • C. Promoting Literacy
    • D. Conflict Management and Mediation

    Refer to lesson Service Learning with a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson Communicating with Parents for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/communicating-with-parents/

    Refer to lesson Show Yourself Off: Write a Résumé for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/show-yourself-off-write-a-resume/

    Refer to lesson What a Wonderful Teacher You Will Be for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-a-wonderful-teacher-you-will-be/

    Refer to lesson Stories, Stories and More Stories for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/stories-stories-and-more-stories/

    Refer to lesson Posting On Your Wall: More Than Just Facebook for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/posting-on-your-wall-more-than-just-facebook/

    Refer to lesson The Art of Planning a Lesson for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-art-of-planning-a-lesson/

    Refer to lesson Philosophy of Education for additional activities, idea and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/philosophy-of-education/

    Module II Handouts
    —-
    A. Types
    1. Verbal
    2. Non-verbal
    3. Written
    4. Electronic

    The world of the 21st Century is a world connected by communication. Throughout history, communication has changed cultures. Communication and technology have also altered human interactions. Students must have excellent communication skills and abilities to thrive today and in the future.

    Verbal

    Clarity is critical in all communications. If it is not clear, it is more difficult to learn, follow directions, or understand. Verbal communications or spoken words are relatively easy to capture and discuss but can be influenced by many factors, Some of these are understanding of the vocabulary or language being spoken, listening skills, or cultural differences.

    Verbal communication skills for teachers include:

    • understanding the developmental level of the students
    • using appropriate styles and approaches
    • interpreting body language from the listeners
    • vocabulary
    • knowledge of the subject
    • organizational skills
    • knowing when to stop and repeat, review, and when to continue the presentation.

    When students are communicating verbally, their background of experience affects how they interpret what has been said. When they hear, “It is raining cats and dogs,” they may visualize it actually raining cats and dogs.

    Students may also understand a concept or statement, but they may not have the vocabulary or confidence to respond appropriately. Often students may know an answer to a question but be hesitant to answer verbally aloud.

    It is important to give all students, and especially those pursuing education careers, many opportunities to articulate their ideas and thoughts in nonthreatening environments. It is helpful for students to work in small groups so they can gain skills in expressing themselves prior to presenting in front of the class or other groups.

    Clarity is easier when all involved in the communication speak the same language. More and more in classrooms, students have limited English skills. In the past, most of the English language learners spoke fluent Spanish. Today, students speaking a multitude of languages are more and more common. Teachers and potential teachers need strategies for working with students of all ages with varying abilities with the English language.

    Non-verbal

    Non-verbal communication is the ability to enhance the expression of ideas and concepts through the use of body language, gestures, facial expressions, and tone of voice. Pictures, icons, and symbols are also tools of non-verbal communication.

    Written

    Written communication is another important component of educational communicating. Students must be able to read and understand the written word and express themselves effectively in writing. Effective writers understand writing for different audiences, using various styles, and the value of organizing information prior to the writing process.

    It is particularly important for students who seek a career as an educator to understand the value of using correct grammar and spelling. At this time of their education, their written communications should reflect their command of the English language. It is always important for writers to proofread and examine all written materials. They should be able to edit and revise after critically reading their materials. A teacher of any subject should be proficient in expressing themselves in writing.

    Electronic Communication

    The areas of electronic communications are vast. A word, sentence, paragraph or entire document can be sent around the world instantly. Emails, blogs, social media and other forms of electronic communication make it easy to communicate, but they also require responsibility for what and how messages are sent and received.

    —-
    B. Teacher Communication

    Communication skills are an integral part of teaching. Communication is sending and receiving messages. Teaching is sending out information in a variety of ways and interpreting the messages that students return. It enables effective teachers to plan, evaluate, and help students connect new information and skills to their background of knowledge.

    Some strategies for integrating communication in teaching and training are:

    • Using good grammar when speaking
    • Sending clear messages
    • Communicating with a broad vocabulary
    • Being a good listener
    • Modeling verbal, non-verbal, and written communication skills
    • Being accepting of all students’ differences in communicating
    • Using a variety of methods for communicating with parents-phone, emails, personal visits, letters/postcards, conferences
    • Sending out newsletters
    • Utilizing school or class web pages
    • Asking for input from parents about ways to improve home-school communication
    • Involving students in planning and presenting programs
    • Providing an environment where students feel comfortable to communicate

    One of the most important ways for teachers to increase communication in the classroom is to use open-ended questions. Using questions that encourage students to articulate answers, such as:

    Teachers should also plan activities that incorporate a variety of ways for students to communicate. These could include:

    • small group activities using a recorder and a presenter
    • class presentations
    • written and oral reports
    • class blogs
    • vocabulary games
    • word walls
    • using technology such as student-made videos or slide shows, photography
    • interactive bulletin boards
    • journaling activities where the teacher responds to entries rather than evaluating them
    • journaling activities where students exchange and respond to peers’ entries
    • class debates about issues connected to curricular topics

    —-
    C. Promoting Literacy

    Literacy develops over a period of time. It evolves as students improve their reading skills and develop higher-order thinking skills that help them comprehend, analyze and communicate ideas. Effective literacy programs give students many opportunities to use language and communication skills in a variety of ways with authentic purposes.

    Many students do not read because they are not motivated to or do not have the skills to read at grade level. Technology is a critical component to literacy development in today’s classrooms. Students need opportunities to learn from computers and with computers. When evaluating the role of classroom communications in promoting student literacy, teachers should consider using some of the following strategies:

    • Print-rich classrooms that encourage students to explore actively and then talk, read, and write about their learning experiences. Computers and other forms of technology are tools that help learners write, make charts, and analyze data from their activities.
    • Scaffold learners with tools to support students as they move from dependence to independence with reading. Talking books and other multimedia resources make connections between the sounds and images with the printed word.
    • Reflection and revision is important as learners develop reading and writing skills at the same time. Use strategies such as peer read and review that help each student progress.
    • Connect learners with others outside the classroom. Technology makes it possible for students to connect with others in the community and around the world. Skype a class in another state or country. Do service learning activities that make learning and problem-solving necessary and relevant.
    • Emphasize vocabulary every day. Words are critical to literacy. Try new technologies for expanding vocabulary such as a class web site, blog, or wiki. These teach technology skills, vocabulary and literacy.
    • Repetition is a good form of learning. This is true especially with new vocabulary. Students may need to work with a word six times before they really understand it enough to use it correctly.
      —-

    D. Conflict Management and Mediation

    Conflict is a daily part of classroom settings. Conflicts may be based on real differences and sometimes conflict between students or adults begins with a miscommunication. Communication skills are an integral part of mediation and conflict management.

    The types of conflict and ways to deal with them vary greatly with the age of the students. For example, young children may both want the same toy. The way a teacher handles this conflict would be very different from the way a teacher would handle high school students throwing punches at each other. Most schools have policies for dealing with serious conflicts, especially that cause injuries. However, most classroom conflicts can be resolved or avoided with classroom management and communication strategies.

    Classroom rules should be simple and guide students to treat others the way they want to be treated. Rules should be discussed and when possible, developed with input from the students. Rules and consequences for breaking them should posted in the classroom.

    For young children, it is important to begin teaching them how to be responsible for their actions. Develop a simple list of steps, such as:

    • Stop before you get angry.
    • Ask the other person to stop.
    • Move away from the other person.
    • Ask an adult for help.
      Young children need to learn the vocabulary or words to describe how they feel.

    For older students, communication is the key to helping them identify the issue and resolve it. The Four D’s of Solving Conflicts might include:

    • Define the problem in the student’s words.
    • Develop alternatives to the conflict.
    • Discuss the alternatives, encourage students to evaluate how each might work
    • Decide on a solution.
      It is important for students have many opportunities to apply strategies in a “practice” mode before they can be expected to use them without adult intervention.

    Bullying is not a new problem in schools, but it is an issue that all students face. Strategies such as agreeing to disagree, apologizing, and I-Statements are helpful tools in avoiding bullying and conflict situations.

    Eight strategies for conflict resolution are presented int the YouTube™ video:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DybPI_vr-Ig

    Practicum students have probably seen conflict situations during their intern situations. It is important for them to discuss what they observed and reflect about how well it seemed to work. These experiences will give them ideas about ways to handle conflicts as teachers.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module II Handouts

    • Bulletin Board Ideas
    • Bulletin Board on Pinterest
    • Bulletin Board Project Rubric
    • Bulletin Board Project
    • Children’s Book Project
    • Developing Your Story
    • KWL Chart Bulletin Boards
    • Moral Character Story Ideas
    • Nonverbal Communication Observation
    • Note Taking Posting On Your Wall: More Than Just Facebook
    • Questions?
    • Rubric for Storytelling
    • Same Words With Different Meanings
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Bulletin Board Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Bulletin Board Competition (Key)
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Storybook Creation Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Storybook Creation Competition (Key)
    • TAFE Bulletin Board Contest
    • TAFE Storybook Creation Competition

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Interview teachers about effective conflict management and mediation techniques. Summarize the information into a slideshow presentation, Prezi, video or panel discussion.
    • Have students observe their internship classroom for a set period of time and record the types of non-verbal communication they see from teachers and students.
    • Display educational quotes in the classroom. Provide the students with sticky notes so they can articulate what the quote means to them and stick them on the quotes so students can read what others think the quotes mean.
    • Take a communication quiz to assess skills at:
      http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newCS_99.htm
    • Have students identify and explain English Language Proficiency Strategies (ELPS) they have used in other classes. They can list all of the strategies and rate the ones they feel are most beneficial for their learning.
    • For conflict management practice, have students observe in a kindergarten classroom. List problem situations. Research methods to develop a plan to help these children resolve their problems.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    YouTube™ Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Effective strategies for dealing with bullying include:

    • a. I-statements
    • b. apologizing
    • c. ignoring it
    • d. a and b

    2. ELL refers to

    • a. Every Language Learner
    • b. Each Language Learner
    • c. English Language Learner
    • d. Extra Language Learner

    3. _________________is a good form of learning, especially with vocabulary.

    • a. Reciting
    • b. Repetition
    • c Listening
    • d. Reflecting

    4. Students may need to work with a word ____________times before they understand it well enough to use it correctly.

    • a. six
    • b. ten
    • c. two
    • d. twenty

    5. Another word for clarity is ____________.

    • a. vague
    • b. clear
    • c. a and b
    • d. tone

    6. Print rich classrooms provide

    • a. books, newspapers
    • b. word walls
    • c. computers
    • d. a, b, c

    7. An important skill for success in writing is ____________.

    • a. listening
    • b. speaking or verbal communication
    • c. gesturing
    • d. proofreading

  • III. Principles and Theories of Human Development

    TEKS Addressed

    • (2) The student understands the learner and the learning process.
      • (A) apply principles and theories of human development appropriate to specific teaching or training situations
      • (B) apply principles and theories about the learning process to specific teaching or training situations
      • (C) analyze personal behaviors and skills that facilitate the learning process
      • (D) suggest effective instructional practices to accommodate learning differences, learner exceptionality, and special-needs conditions

    Module Content

    Principles and Theories of Development is the third unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains three TEA units of study.

    A. Related to Teaching
    B. Related to Learning Process
    C. Related to Effective Instructional Practices

    Refer to lesson Stories, Stories and More Stories for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/stories-stories-and-more-stories/

    Refer to lesson Posting On Your Wall: More Than Just Facebook for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/posting-on-your-wall-more-than-just-facebook/

    Refer to lesson The Art of Planning a Lesson for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-art-of-planning-a-lesson/

    Refer to lesson Teaching All Learners for more activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/teaching-to-all-learners/

    Refer to lesson Researching Learning Disabilities for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/researching-learning-disabilities/

    Module III Handouts
    —-
    A. Related to Teaching

    Many theories have been “works in progress for many years.” It is easy to confuse the various theorists and who said what. Much research has been done to document that families and children have changed, violence in movies and TV leads to real-world violence, families have little time together and deal with stress, poverty, and unemployment. What teacher has time to worry about theories? It is hard enough to teach without trying to analyze Erickson’s theory of psychosocial development.

    Developing a basic knowledge of development and learning theory helps bridge the gaps in understanding children, planning developmentally appropriate activities and creating educational environments where children flourish in all areas of their development.

    The Four Areas of Development

    Human development is like a pie with four equal pieces. It is easy to remember each of the areas of development by remembering the acronym PIES.

    • P-Physical Development – motor and muscle development, growth, and body coordination and control
    • I-Intellectual Development – developing concepts, solving problems, learning
    • E-Emotional Development – feelings, self-concept, attitudes
    • S-Social Development – Getting along with others, working with groups, adjusting to society

    Principles of Development

    • Development is similar for everyone.
    • Development builds on earlier learning.
    • The different areas of learning are interrelated.
    • Development proceeds at an individual rate.
    • Development occurs in sequence.
    • Development is continuous throughout life.

    The term developmentally appropriate describes activities that are at the correct level for a student’s abilities in the areas of development. For example, it would not be developmentally appropriate to ask a kindergarten student to read a chapter and take a quiz. They cannot read and write at their stage of development. It would be developmentally appropriate for a high school student.

    Often, the students in one classroom may be at different levels. That is why teachers plan different activities and teach the same concept in several different ways. Various programs such as English Language Learners and Special Needs students require using accommodations, modifications, and innovative strategies.

    Refer to Human Growth and Development lesson The Preschool-Aged Child for information and plans for enrichment at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-preschool-aged-child/
    —-
    B. Related to Learning Process

    From Martin Luther who believed all people should learn to read, not just the wealthy, so they could understand the Bible to contemporary theorists like Howard Gardiner who believe everyone is smart in their particular “intelligence,” it is important to know theories about learning. Most child development and education textbooks provide detailed information about the many people who have contributed to theories about learning. This list includes some of the significant names.

    • Martin Luther-advocated literacy for all
    • John Amos Comenius-created the first picture book for children, Orbis Pictus
    • Friedrich Froebel-labeled the father of kindergarten
    • Maria Montessori-worked with children with problems, developed techniques still used today
    • John Dewey-initiated Progressivism or focusing on a child’s interests rather than subject matter
    • Jean Piaget-developed significant studies about intellectual development
    • Lev Vygotsky-studied sociocultural development and believed that play promotes language development
    • Abraham Maslow-created a theory of motivation and his Hierarchy of Needs
    • Erik Erikson-wrote the Stages of Psychosocial Development about how emotional and social development are interrelated
    • Howard Gardiner-developed the Theory of Multiple Intelligences

    Watch this YouTube™ video that illustrates how one class used their creativity to remember cognitive learning theories:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8mo2CLSKJ8&feature=related

    It could stimulate an assignment where students each write a verse about a different theorist to help them remember learning theorists.

    —-
    C. Related to Effective Instructional Practices

    The important objective for students in Practicum of Education and Training is to understand basic theories well enough to apply them effectively. Each teacher has a different personality and style. Students will also need to consider their behaviors and skills to determine their strengths and weaknesses.
    Personal behaviors to consider include:

    • Be willing to listen and understand
    • Respect other individuals
    • Keep the goal in mind
    • Be flexible
    • Give others the credit for having accomplished an objective or achieved a success.
    • Reach out to give and ask for assistance
    • Keep an open mind
    • Be willing to try new ideas

    Teachers also need to evaluate the various needs of their students. Most classes in schools or in business and industry will have a diverse collection of students with different language abilities, learning levels, and other needs. The following YouTube™ video provides seven steps to assist English Language Learners (ELL). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Ub0NJ6UClI

    The steps would be useful in helping all students. They are:

    1. Assess needs
    2. Empathize and foster a sense of belonging
    3. Assign a buddy
    4. Read and reread books aloud
    5. Encourage family involvement
    6. Foster cultural diversity
    7. Keep track of student success and track progress

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module III Handouts

    • Applying Theories to Practice
    • Background and Attitudes
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy Action Verbs
    • Career and Technical Special Populations Training Manual
    • Four Areas of Development
    • Ideas for Special Populations Accommodations
    • KWL Chart for Teaching All Learners
    • Lesson Plan Project Rubric
    • Lesson Plan Project
    • Note Taking Researching Learning Disabilities
    • Researching Learning Disabilities Project Rubric
    • Researching Learning Disabilities Project
    • Researching Learn Main
    • Sample Lesson Plan Template 1
    • Sample Student Profiles
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Researching Learning Disabilities Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Researching Learning Disabilities Competiton (Key)
    • Slide Presentation Notes
    • Students With Disabilities
    • Students With Disabilities (Key)
    • Technology in the Classroom
    • Tips for Working with LEP Students

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students can choose three theorists to compare on the Applying Theories to Practice graphic organizer. They could also draw the names so that students compare a variety of theorists.
    • Make a video, PowerPoint or bulletin board with photographs they have taken that illustrate the principles of development.
    • Have students make a display with educational materials that supports theories for a particular theorist.
    • After students have been at their field-based internships for a few visits, have them list strategies they have seen that represent various theories.
    • Write in their journals about the theories they think are most significant and why. They should give examples of ways they will incorporate these ideas when they teach and why.
    • Take the Learning Styles Quiz at
      http://www.edutopia.org/multiple-intelligences-learning-styles-quiz
      Put each of the areas of the multiple intelligences on a bulletin board. After taking the quiz, have each student write their name on a sticky note and place it by their dominant area of intelligence. This will show what types of strategies will work best within each class as well as show students there are many types of learners.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    YouTube™ Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The four areas of development include:

    • a. physical, intellectual, emotional, and social
    • b. physical, intellectual, energy, and skills
    • c. promotion, integration, encouragement, and support
    • d. physical, imagination, emotional, and spiritual

    2. Developmentally appropriate describes learning activities provided that are at the correct level for a students’

    • a. age
    • b. grade
    • c. ability
    • d. accommodations

    3. ___________believed all people should learn to read so they could read and understand the Bible for themselves

    • a. Maria Montessori
    • b. John Dewey
    • c. Friederich Froebel
    • d. Martin Luther

    4. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences

    • a. emphasizes emotional development
    • b. explains various ways people can have intelligence
    • c. is a theory of motivation
    • d. has been proven incorrect

    5. Comenius created

    • a. the Hierarchy of Needs
    • b. Orbus Pictus
    • c. Psycho Social Development Pyramid
    • d. Theory of Multiple Intelligences

    6. Most classes contain students

    • a. at different levels
    • b. with various cultural backgrounds
    • c. a and b
    • d. all of the above

    7. Learning about theories helps

    • a. teachers develop a personal philosophy
    • b. teachers understand how to instruct others
    • c. teachers understand student behavior
    • d. all of the above

  • IV. Effective Learning Environment

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student creates and maintains an effective learning environment.
    (A) create and maintain safe and effective learning environments
    (B) integrate teacher or trainer characteristics that promote an effective learning environment
    (C) apply classroom-management techniques that promote an effective learning environment

    Module Content

    Effective Learning Environments is the fourth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains three TEA units of study.

    A. Safety Issues
    B. Teacher/Trainer Characteristics
    C. Classroom Management

    Refer to lesson Creating an Effective Learning Environment for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/creating-an-effective-learning-environment/

    Refer to lesson What a Wonderful Teacher You Will Be for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-a-wonderful-teacher-you-will-be/

    Refer to lesson Service Learning with a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Refer to lesson The Art of Planning a Lesson for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-art-of-planning-a-lesson/

    Module 4 Handouts

    —-
    A. Safety Issues

    Teachers have many tasks, but nothing is more important than creating learning environments that help students feel safe, secure and comfortable. It is critical to families and children that they are protected from physical and psychological harm. It is one thing to observe safe and pleasant environments and another thing entirely to plan, create, and supervise a place where students of any age will be able to learn.

    Safety considerations can be quite different based on the age of the children in the area. Young children are curious about everything. They explore, act, and create without thinking of consequences.

    Safety considerations for preschool:

    • Art materials such as scissors, glue, paint, clay, finger paint should be safe. Check the labels and purchase items that are not toxic.
    • Always supervise children and watch what they put in their eyes, mouth, nose and ears.
    • Make certain toys are age appropriate and in good repair.
    • Keep water tables and other water areas germ free and well-supervised.
    • Follow proper rules for using and storing chemicals.
    • Check that outdoor play areas have age-appropriate play equipment that has no rough edges or loose parts. Areas should be thoroughly checked every day before children play.
    • Include safe, soft surfaces to create a cushion when children fall.

    Look at the website with more information about preschool safety:
    http://www.healthychild.net/SafetyFirst.php?article_id=179

    Safety for older students is still a big concern. Check for all of the items on the preschool list as well as those below:

    • Remember to inspect classrooms for items that could cause falls.
    • Inspect electrical cords, outlets, and power strips that may be overloaded with too much power for technology.
    • Avoid stacking storage boxes or shelves too high or with too many boxes that could fall.
    • Teach rules for specific safety behaviors in the halls, library, playground, restrooms and the cafeteria.
    • Demonstrate the proper use of equipment.
    • Insist that students keep their hands and feet to themselves.
    • Be alert to check for the safety and toxins in all materials and supplies.
    • Keep rooms well ventilated and at the proper temperatures
    • Remember to consider emotional safety for all students. Create an environment where each can express emotions and feelings without fear but with respect for all others.

    For all levels, know and practice emergency procedures for fires, tornadoes, lock downs and other emergencies.
    —-
    B. Teacher/Trainer Characteristics

    Teachers are a major key to the success of learning. By now, Practicum of Education and Training students have identified their strengths and weaknesses for teaching and training. This program gives them opportunities to integrate their unique personalities, skills, and traits to help others learn.

    New teachers should recall the teachers that helped them the most throughout their school years. Much research has been done to identify qualities of teachers. Read a short summary of this research provided by the Stanford University Center for Teaching and Learning which identifies twelve characteristics beneficial to teachers at:
    http://ctl.stanford.edu/handbook/characteristics-of-effective-teachers.html

    Students can use Handout My Visions for Teaching to imagine ways they can integrate their personal characteristics when they teach.

    —-

    C. Classroom Management

    Classroom management can cause fear and anxiety, especially for new teachers. Teachers have to organize curriculum, testing, instructional strategies, and interventions into an efficient learning program that promotes appropriate behavior. Three fundamentals for working with any age of students are:
    1. Providing engaging, age appropriate instruction
    2. Organizing a well-managed classroom
    3. Developing positive relationships with students

    Some classroom management techniques to apply might include:

    • Teachers should look and act professional. This includes the way they dress, speak and act.
    • Start strong with an enforceable discipline plan. It easier to adjust once all students are in the habit of following procedures and rules.
    • Be fair to all students and staff. The teacher is a model that students will copy.
    • Use humor when possible to stop disruptions or negative situations.
    • Stop disruptions with a whisper or individual conversation only to the students involved. This allows the rest of the class to continue to learn and work without additional distractions.
    • Avoid confrontations in front of the entire class. Work for a win-win situation by talking with disruptive students privately.
    • Maintain high expectations and communicate them to the class.
    • Praise positive behavior.
    • Overplan and limit free time. Post daily objectives, stay on track, and use transition times to teach.
    • Be consistent with rules, actions, and reactions to inappropriate situations.
    • Make rules simple and short. Involve members of the class in creating some of the rules.
    • Consider each day a new day. Start each class expecting cooperation and appropriate interactions.

    Practicum of Education and Training instructors will need to provide many opportunities and activities for students to analyze and respond to situations requiring management techniques. It is difficult for them to assume total control of the classrooms where they may be placed as “student teachers.” Refer to the teaching strategies listed below for suggestions about accomplishing this objective.

    Classroom Management YouTube™ video:
    https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/refocusing-students?utm_source=Alpha+List&utm_campaign=e3870fd4b4-

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 4 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Observing Guidance Strategies
    • Student View
    • Comic Book Templates

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students can choose a grade level to write a first day of school lesson plan for teaching safety rules and procedures.
    • Research and list five methods for guiding the behavior of children. Tell why they think each is effective and give examples they have observed during their internship activities.
    • Have students work in groups to list times when teachers can allow children to make choices about responsibilities and assignments.
    • Direct students to identify and watch four YouTube™ videos on classroom management. Have them select the one that is most beneficial to present a one-minute speech explaining its effectiveness and how they could use it in their internship assignment.
    • Students could work individually, then in small groups to list the most effective classroom management strategies they have observed. They could make a brochure or video for YouTube to suggest these tips for other students and teachers.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    YouTube™

    • Bully-Proof Children by Teaching 9 Conflict Resolution Strategies
      This video reviews 9 Conflict Resolution Strategies to teach to children. Teaching children how to better handle conflict, can help prevent bullying. This is helpful for parents, educators and anyone who works with children.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DybPI_vr-Ig

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Constant supervision of young children is important because

    • a. children are curious
    • b. children act before they think of consequences
    • c. teachers need to stay busy
    • d. a and b

    2. Children should be taught rules and behaviors for

    • a. classroom and playground
    • b. restrooms
    • c. library and cafeteria areas
    • d. all of the above

    3. Teachers should provide a safe emotional climate at school

    • a. so students can express emotions appropriately
    • b. so students will learn to respect the feelings of others
    • c. a and b
    • d. parents will approve

    4. Professional teachers consider the way they

    • a. dress
    • b. speak and act
    • c. treat other staff members
    • d. a, b, c

    5. When creating class rules, teachers should

    • a. keep them short and simple
    • b. include students in creating them when possible
    • c. have different rules for each student
    • d. a and b only

    6. Teachers should demonstrate

    • a. proper use of equipment
    • b. insist children treat each other safely
    • c. check for toxic supplies in the classroom
    • d. all of the above

    7. _______are the major keys to successful learning.

    • a. Teachers
    • b. Computers
    • c. Schools
    • d. Textbooks

  • V. Internship/Field-Based Experiences

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student participates in field-based experiences in education or training.
    (A) apply instructional strategies and concepts within a local educational or training facility
    (B) document, assess, and reflect on instructional experiences

    Module Content

    Internship/Field-Based Experiences is the fifth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains two TEA units of study.

    A. Application of Concepts
    B. Experience Assessments

    Refer to lesson Posting On Your Wall: More Than Just Facebook for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/posting-on-your-wall-more-than-just-facebook/

    Module 5 Handouts

    —-
    A. Application of Concepts

    The internship component is an essential part of Practicum in Education and Training programs. It is where students can apply, demonstrate, integrate, plan, conduct, and evaluate all of the knowledge and skills they have been acquiring. While the internship portion is a favorite of students, it can present obstacles and challenges for instructors. Each school district operates the internship experience in different ways. Remember that it is worth obtaining administrative support for this vital instructional opportunity.

    Some options to consider for this part of training are:

    • Transporting students to other campuses in school vehicles. Check with administrators for ways to implement getting the students to other campuses. In some areas, it may be close enough for them to walk.
    • Place students in other classes at the high school. For example, students could work with teachers, helping with English Language Learners or in Life Skills classes.
    • Plan special educational programs where students develop plans and teach particular activities. For example, obtain support to partner with another grade level to have a “Multicultural Fair.” Incorporate specific TEKS for the younger students and involve parents and the community. This could even be done as an evening event.
    • Be creative. The rewards are worth the effort.

    Justify the costs of transportation to administrators by explaining the value of the student-interns in providing:

    • one-to-one instruction for the other students they assist
    • the tasks they help other teachers do, such as reading to children
    • technology assistance
    • role models of students who value staying in school
    • preparing potential school employees as future paraprofessionals and teachers.

    Many programs require students to wear jackets, shirts or other clothing that identifies them as an intern. It is also appropriate for them to wear a name tag or badge that tells their name and indicates they are authorized to be in other locations.

    It is imperative that students recognize that they are a representative of the school district. This means they must be confidential about what they see and that they act professionally and responsibly. The other children they interact with will consider them role models and be influenced by them, both at school and throughout the community.

    —-
    B. Experience Assessments

    Required Forms
    Each student should have a “Training Plan Agreement-Unpaid Work-Based Instruction” form. This can be downloaded at the link listed below.
    Refer to the Resources for Practicum in Education and Training at:
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/practicum-in-education-and-training/

    A copy of the TEKS for Practicum in Education and Training can be attached to the form to explain specific objectives for each training period. The form is signed by the student, the student’s parents, the teacher-coordinator, and the training-sponsor.

    Individual programs may create a contract or policy for students with specific expectations. This might include policies for situations that could arise such as inappropriate behavior, excessive absences, how and where students are accepted into the program and assigned to sites. A sample form is included in the handouts, Practicum in Education and Training Contract.

    Education And Training Classes Agreement And Off Campus Travel Permission. Other forms include a form to use when students apply to the program, Education and Training Form and a form for obtaining references for applicants, Reference Form for Education and Training.
    Work with the principals involved, assistant principals, counselors training sponsors and other involved parties in preparing these forms. Any forms should be approved by the appropriate school administrators.

    The course instructor should develop ways to communicate with training sponsors to obtain input for assessing and evaluating each student in the program. This might include personal visits, phone calls, or emails.

    The instructor should also make visits to observe each student at the training sites. Some of these could be scheduled and others might be impromptu.

    Student Documentation
    Each student will need to keep records of the various classroom where they have interned, numbers of hours completed in classrooms, and specific other types of information. This might be done with a log sheet that is signed by their training sponsor.

    Many programs require students to maintain a journal of activities and reflections about their experiences. These items could be included in the student’s portfolio.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 5 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Education And Training Classes Agreement And Off Campus Travel Permission
    • Education and Training Application Form
    • Reference Form for Education and Training

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students could write a journal or blog about their internship experiences.
    • Each week, students could take and describe a mental “snapshot moment” where they describe in detail one thing that happened at their internship site that week. If they could only remember one thing, what would it be and why.
    • Have students collect examples of the work the students at their intern sites have done from activities the students have planned. These could be kept for student portfolios.
    • To help students realize all of the tasks teachers do, have them prepare “A Day In The Life of a _____________Teacher” where they chronicle everything a teacher might do in twenty-four hours.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Since the Internship or Field-Based experience component of the Education and Training Cluster may involve students traveling to other campuses, it is important to obtain approval from

    • a. parents of the students
    • b. principals and school administrators
    • c. a and b
    • d. only b

    2. Intern students could be identified in other school areas and classroom by wearing

    • a. clothing that identifies them as part of the Practicum in Education and Training program
    • b. name and photo badges
    • c. regular school clothing so they don’t distract students
    • d. a and b

    3. Students can document, assess and reflect on their Intern experiences with

    • a. a training log sheet
    • b. a journal or blog
    • c. a portfolio
    • d. all of the above

    4. Students are representing the school district and must be ___________about what they see and her.

    • a. eager to share
    • b. collaborative
    • c. confidential
    • d. cooperative

    5. All other students, especially younger ones, consider the Interns to be _________.

    • a. status symbols
    • b. happy
    • c. FCCLA members
    • d. role-models

    6. Issues in Education and Training policies might include

    • a. what action will be taken for inappropriate student behavior
    • b. what action will be taken if a student has excessive absences
    • c. the procedure for assigning students to training sites
    • d. a, b, and c

    7. The Internship component of Practicum in Education and Training allows students to _____________all of the knowledge and skills they have acquired in other classes.

    • a. observe
    • b. apply
    • c. copy
    • d. talk about

  • VI. Lesson Planning

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student plans and uses effective instruction.

    • (A) apply principles and theories that impact instructional planning
    • (B) develop instructional materials that align with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)
    • (C) assess personal planning to meet instructional goals
    • (D) analyze concepts for developing effective instructional strategies
    • (E) analyze instructional strategies for effectiveness
    • (F) explain how learner feedback has been used to guide selection and adjustment of instructional strategies

    Module Content

    Lesson Planning is the sixth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains five TEA units of study.

    A. Principles and Theories that Impact Planning
    B. Instruction that Aligns to TEKS
    C. Writing Instructional Goals
    D. Planning Process, Lesson Cycle, and Instructional Strategies
    E. Communication, Feedback, and Assessment

    Refer to lesson Instructional Methods for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-instructional-methods-we-use-helps-assess-what-is-being-taught/

    Refer to lesson The Art of Planning a Lesson for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-art-of-planning-a-lesson/

    Refer to lesson Posting On Your Wall: More Than Just Facebook for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/posting-on-your-wall-more-than-just-facebook/

    Module VI Handouts
    —-
    A. Principles and Theories that Impact Planning

    Before students can apply principles and theories that impact instructional planning, they will need to study the theorists and begin to develop their personal philosophy of education. Theories of learning and development were discussed in Module III. Theories are also covered extensively in the course, Human Growth and Development.

    In the Practicum of Education and Training program, students will apply those principles and theories as they develop plans. For example, if they subscribe to the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, they will incorporate a variety of engaging activities that allow children to learn independently and in groups.
    —-
    B. Instruction that Aligns to TEKS

    The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are the state standards for what students should know and be able to do.
    The following sites provide the Scope and Sequence and the TEKS for Practicum in Education and Training:

    TEKS
    Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center
    The TEKS for Practicum in Education and Training
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/TEKS-Practicum-in-Education-and-Training.pdf

    Scope and Sequence
    Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/SS.Practicum_in_Education_and_Training.pdf

    The TEKS are units of study, lists of knowledge and skills that each student in a particular class should be able to do after instruction. The TEKS are assessed by various tests, including the STAAR and End of Course exams. Teachers use the TEKS as a basic guide as they determine lesson plans.

    Refer to Effective Lesson Planning: Making A Real-World Connections PowerPoint by the
    Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center,
    This PowerPoint with presentation notes provides a tour through the lesson planning process.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/Effective-Lesson-Planning.pdf

    Practicum in Education and Training students can use Handout Lesson Planning to develop plans for a specific grade level and subject. They should have many opportunities to complete this activity for different grades and subject.

    —-
    C. Writing Instructional Goals

    Goals are broad, general statements about what is to be learned. They are too general for developing specific activities or lessons. Goals and objectives clarify what is to be learned and how it will be assessed. Listing goals and objectives is one way to tell students the expectations of the class.

    Instructional objectives are the specific, measurable, short-term observable student behaviors that teachers can see and evaluate to know what a student has “learned.”
    There are three types of objectives:

    • Cognitive – for mental skills
    • Affective – for attitudes
    • Psychomotor – for physical skills

    Objectives should include the ABCD’s:

    • Audience – who will do it?
    • Behavior – What will they do? This should include action verbs that can be measured, such as demonstrate, list, etc.
    • Conditions – How will learning occur?
    • Degree – How much information is required to determine success.

    An example is:
    The Practicum in Education and Training student (audience) will develop materials that align with the TEKS (behavior) when assigned as a course project (condition) as measured by the lesson plan rubric (degree.)
    Visit http://www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/Objectives/ for additional information about goals and specific lists of action verbs that are aligned with Bloom’s Taxonomy.

    —-

    D. Planning Process, Lesson Cycle, and Instructional Strategies

    Lesson planning certainly varies by age level. Many school districts have adopted specific curricula that are completely developed. An example of this would be CSCOPE. The planning process includes considering identifying areas for each year, semester, month, week and day. Some districts or campus administrators provide a lesson planning template or required format for plans. Others may allow each teacher to prepare a system. Many schools have teachers post their lesson plans on the school web site.

    Teaching is a continuous cycle of decisions about what to teach, what the student will do, and what the teacher will do. The Lesson Cycle is a process for selecting activities, strategies, and materials to help the learner master objectives. It allows for repetition of assignments, activity, student-centered learning, student engagement and meaningful learning. Teaching and learning are a continuous cycle where instruction is presented, observed, received, evaluated, and repeated when necessary until the student is successful.

    Instructional strategies determine different methods that can be used to help a learner. What is learned depends on what is taught, the student’s level of development, their interests, and the methods used to teach. All students do not learn in the same way. That is why teachers should use a variety of instructional strategies.

    An extensive list of instructional strategies can be viewed at:
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/practicum-in-education-and-training/

    Practicum in Education and Training students need many opportunities to use various strategies in their learning and apply them at various levels of teaching.
    —-
    E. Communication, Feedback, and Assessment

    Feedback, like communication, should be a two-way process.

    • The teacher observes students and assesses their work to know how well a student is acquiring information or objectives.
    • The students also like to know how well they are doing. They want feedback from their teachers about their progress.

    Some ways to communicate with or give feedback to students are:

    • Provide frequent verbal and written comments on papers, in notes, and in personal conversations.
    • Use a rubric or checklist with assignments to give specific feedback.
    • Make written comments on journals and other written work.
    • Give authentic praise. Point out specific accomplishments, for example, ““That video subtitle you used is a perfect way to emphasize your main idea.”
    • Return papers, homework, and tests in a timely manner.
    • When appropriate give oral feedback in a private conversation.
    • Visual gestures, such as a smile, are a quick and immediate feedback.

    The way that pupils are involved in planning, told what to do next, encouraged and motivated are keys for effective assessment of learning. The assessment of student learning continues as teachers observe, evaluate, and reflect about the lesson plans and activities. Typically, it will reveal what strategies are working, when review or reteaching is necessary and when it is time to move to the next objective.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    Module VI Handouts

    • Applying Theory to Lesson Planning
    • Blooms Taxonomy Action Verbs
    • Effective Lesson Planning
    • IRD Lesson Template
    • KWL Chart Lesson Planning
    • Lesson Plan Project Rubric
    • Lesson Plan Project
    • Lesson Plan Template
    • Lesson Planning
    • Note Taking The Art of Planning a Lesson
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Lesson Plan Competition
    • Scavenger Hunt TAFE Lesson Plan Competition (Key)
    • Strategies For Teaching Vocabulary
    • TAFE Lesson Plan Competition

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Use the handout Lesson Planning for students to select a grade level, a language or math TEK, and make a lesson plan.
    • Have each student demonstrate how to teach the lesson plan to the Practicum in Education and Training class.
    • Select a grade to plan for and review the state standards for that grade level. Make a list of the standards the student needs to know more about to teach them most effectively. Organize a KWL chart to show what the student knows, which they need to know more about, and how the student will learn more about those areas. Add a copy of the form to the student’s portfolio.
    • Work individually, then with a partner to develop a list of instructional strategies that are most effective. Make a list incorporating the strategies from each group. Develop a brochure with the strategies to give to each teacher in the district. The list could also be placed on the school web site.
    • Use the Theory and Lesson Planning handout to explain how specific theories apply to lesson planning. Students could also cite specific examples for activities they have seen in class observations.
    • Ask the intern supervising teacher to copy a lesson from the curriculum that is being used, such as CSCOPE or materials being used for Response to Intervention (RTI). Ask the teacher for strengths and weaknesses of the program.
    • Students could research the web sites of schools throughout the nation and other countries to collect examples of lesson plans posted to school sties.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Students will devise instructional methods the align with the ____________.

    • a. SIOP
    • b. TEKS
    • c. SWBAT
    • d. TAKS

    2. __________are broad, general statements about what is to be learned.

    • a. objectives
    • b. goals
    • c. TEKS
    • d. lessons

    3. ____________are specific, measurable student behaviors that teachers can see and evaluate.

    • a. goals
    • b. objectives
    • c. lessons
    • d. TEKS

    p(tight.) 4. Teachers should use a variety of instructional strategies because

    • a. all students do not learn in the same way
    • b. all students are not at the same level
    • c. students may have different types of intelligence
    • d. a, b, and c

    5. Learner __________is important to guide selection and adjustment of instructional strategies.

    • a. testing
    • b. assignments
    • c. feedback
    • d. planning

    6. Teaching, learning, and evaluating are a __________cycle.

    • a. closed
    • b. open
    • c. continuous
    • d. rotating

    7. Praise given to students should be

    • a. authentic and genuine
    • b. constant
    • c. perceptive
    • d. personal

  • VII. Technology in Teaching

    TEKS Addressed

    (8) The student develops technology skills.
    (A) recommend technology applications appropriate for specific subject matter and student needs
    (B) integrate the skillful use of technology as a tool for instruction, evaluation, and management

    Module Content

    Technology in Teaching is the seventh unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains two TEA units of study.

    A. Appropriate Technology Applications
    B. Technology Integration in Practice

    Refer to lesson Teaching to All Learners for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/teaching-to-all-learners/

    Module 7 Handouts

    —-

    A. Appropriate Technology Applications

    Teaching is changing in many ways. Technology is one area where the changes occur almost daily. Strategies or equipment that is new today could well be obsolete in a few weeks. It is the responsibility of the teacher to evaluate applications to determine their effectiveness for the age and abilities of students and the knowledge and skills they support.

    Technology can improve education in many ways by:

    • Providing more realistic and relevant learning with digital simulations and models, virtual activities
    • Exposing students throughout the globe
    • Providing digital multimedia for creating presentations and projects
    • Presenting E-books
    • Making class web pages and web classrooms
    • Using video-making technology
    • Developing digital learning games
    • Providing digital data storage

    Explore the 100 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools at:

    http://edudemic.com/2011/11/best-web-tools/

    —-
    B. Technology Integration in Practice

    Students in Practicum in Education and Training are probably already using many forms of technology in their personal lives. As they have observed and interned in several classrooms of different grade levels and subjects, they have probably seen many types of technology in use. They will need to have guidelines about what is appropriate when implementing technology as they teach.

    Schools put a lot of money into putting technology into classrooms. It is important to have guidelines for integrating its use with students:

    • Check the district policy about what acceptable use policy is required before students are released onto the world wide web. All students of any age and their parents need to know technology rules.
    • Teach students procedures for using and handling all equipment from how to turn it on to where to put it away.
    • Develop rules about what settings students can use and change. Make sure they know how to use files, folders, ways to open and when to delete. This would include respect for the materials of others stored on the device.
    • Devise rules for Internet safety. This would partially depend on the age of students in the class.
    • Make it a clear to students about when it is appropriate to print and if they need permission from the teacher.

    Teachers should think about ways to use technology to improve student engagement. Computers are not just for keeping students busy.
    Students will need additional monitoring while using technology. Make certain they stay on task at the appropriate sites.
    Technology should be a strategy incorporated with other activities and lessons.
    Teach students to question the validity of online sources. Everything they read online is not true. Help them learn to separate credible sources from others.
    Try unique applications for tried and true strategies like PowerPoints and video streaming.

    Lesson Plans for Information Security
    Free presentations and lessons from the Purdue University on Internet and technology safety.

    http://www.cerias.purdue.edu/education/k-12/teaching_resources/lessons_presentations/.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 7 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Web Directory
    • Internet Critique Sheet
    • Video Storyboard
    • Using Technology in the Classroom

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Involve students in creating a classroom web site.
    • Plan a family technology night to teach families specific technology skills.
    • Have students research how technology is used to assist in areas of special needs.
    • After doing research, have students create criteria for incorporating technology at various grade levels.
    • Have student develop a budget of how they would spend $1000 in their intern classroom to purchase technology.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. ________________evaluate technology applications to determine their effectiveness for practical classes.

    • a. students
    • b. technicians
    • c. teachers
    • d. parents

    2. Teachers need to devise and monitor rules for __________________safety.

    • a. internet
    • b. Facebook
    • c. Quizlet
    • d. Twitter

    3. Teachers should check the _____________ policy before allowing students to use the internet.

    • a. school district
    • b. classroom
    • c. computer
    • d. Google

    4. Everything students read on the internet is

    • a. valid
    • b. not true
    • c. helpful
    • d. true

    5. Using free Web classroom tools

    • a. is an inexpensive way to expose students to a variety of tech applications
    • b. engages students in new strategies
    • c. is boring
    • d. a and b

    6. All students need to know and practice

    • a. correct use and storage of technology equipment
    • b. how to use computers to keep students occupied
    • c. rules for technology in the classrooms where students intern
    • d. a and c

    7. Technology applications may be excellent strategies for

    • a. portfolios
    • b. organizing lesson plans
    • c. tracking student achievement
    • d. a, b, and c

  • VIII. Assessing the Learning Process

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student assesses instruction and learning.
    (A) develop and apply assessments to foster student learning
    (B) use assessment strategies to promote personal growth and teaching or training improvement

    Module Content

    Assessing the Learning Process is the eighth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains two TEA units of study.

    A. Learning Assessments
    B. Assessment Strategy Applications

    Refer to lesson Instructional Methods for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-instructional-methods-we-use-helps-assess-what-is-being-taught/

    Refer to lesson The Art of Planning a Lesson for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-art-of-planning-a-lesson/

    Refer to lesson Service Learning with a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Module 8 Handouts

    —-

    A. Learning Assessments

    Assessment is more than quizzes and exams. It includes many methods for getting information about what, how much and how well a student is learning. Assessment is directly connected to accountability, or who is responsible to guarantee a student is learning. Is it the teacher, principle, or school? Some argue that parents and the community are responsible. Others argue that state and federal governments should guarantee student success since they make the standards. Regardless of where the responsibility lays, accurate assessments are vital to helping students be successful.

    Federal and state legislation mandate testing and the monitoring of the testing and scoring. State tests are standards based and are considered high-stakes tests. In Texas, and example of these tests are those that are based on the TEKS and determine advancement and ultimately graduation from public high school. The content of these tests is a major factor in determining the curriculum that is taught. In some school districts, the performance of students is linked to the teacher’s contract and salary.

    Four major purposes of classroom assessment are:
    1. To monitor student progress.
    2. To make instructional decisions.
    3. To evaluate student achievement.
    4. To evaluate the effectiveness of programs.

    —-
    B. Assessment Strategy Applications

    The idea of knowing what a student “understands” is a complex part of teaching. In determining content to teach and evaluate, consider core knowledge and tasks, what is important to know and do, and finally what is valuable to be familiar with.

    When teachers evaluate, they are making a judgement about:

    • how well a student has learned, or the quality of learning, and
    • how much a student has learned, or the quantity of learning.

    A grade is attaching a number or letter to this judgement.

    Types of Assessments

    • Observation – Teachers can use a checklist or short form to record observed skills or application of knowledge or facts. This type of assessment is useful in working with student interns as they work with other students in classrooms.
    • Performance Task Assessment – For this, teachers set up a specific task for students to complete and then document their performance. This could be a writing task or a verbal explanation, or demonstration.
    • Test Assessment – This is probably the most common form of assessment. It is easier to use for large groups and the scoring is objective. It could include: multiple choice, matching, true or false, or fill-in-the-blank questions.
    • Essay – This type of assessment is for evaluating thinking, reasoning, or writing abilities. It relies on subjective grading by the teacher. It takes longer to administer and grade. This may not be the best type of test for students with limited English abilities or special needs accommodations.
    • Oral Reports – These are time consuming for large numbers of students. The students’ presentation of information may be a affected by their speaking skills or language usage. These students could be given the option to do another type of presentation privately with the instructor.
    • Student Self-assessment – This form of assessment is not often used but can be one of the most effective in improving student performance. It requires students to look at their efforts as a teacher would. The student self-assessment grade could be averaged with the teachers grade to obtain a final grade to record. This type of assessment is helpful when students are not making their best effort.
    • Rubrics – This evaluation tool is very useful for assessing complex tasks, such as projects. They are developed to allow the student to know each specific set of criteria and its value in the evaluation or grade.

    An excellent site for developing and managing rubrics is

    Rubrics
    Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center,
    This site provides a collection of rubrics ready to download for a variety of assignments and projects.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/classroom-essentials/rubrics/

    Accurately evaluating a student’s effort is one of the most difficult parts of the teaching process. It is important in knowing when to re-teach, analyzing effectiveness of instruction and determining what is best for the student. Teachers should use a variety of evaluation strategies because some students will perform better on some methods than on others.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 8 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Assess A Test
    • Comic Book Template Organizer

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Make a rubric to assess an activity they developed for their intern site.
    • Have them list times when student self-assessment would be beneficial.
    • Students could give a one-minute speech about the type of assessment they think is most accurate.
    • Write an analysis of the best or worst evaluation or assessment they received and how it made them feel about learning.
    • Have each student evaluate their employability readiness. Use the Practicum in Education and Training Career and Technical Education Program Skills Inventory from the Statewide Instructional Resources Center web site.
      http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/CTE-Program-Skills-Inventory-Practicum-in-Education-and-Training2.pdf

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Assessment is directly connected to ________where results are closely monitored by state and federal government agencies.

    • a. TEKS
    • b. accountability
    • c. development
    • d. positive attitudes

    2. _________________a student’s efforts is one of the most difficult parts of the teaching process.

    • a. Evaluating
    • b. Labeling
    • c. Predicting
    • d. Documenting

    3. __________are useful evaluation tools because they allow students to know specific criteria and the value of each.

    • a. true-false tests
    • b. essays
    • c. Rubrics
    • d. Oral reports

    4. An effective, but often overlooked type of assessment is ________________ ________-_____________.

    • a. student self-assessment
    • b. teacher directed-learning
    • c. intern field-based
    • d. performance task-assessment

    5. When teachers evaluate, they are making judgements about

    • a. how well a student has learned
    • b. how much a student has learned
    • c. who is smartest
    • d. a and b

    6. Classroom assessments are important because

    • a. they monitor student progress
    • b. they help teachers make instructional decisions
    • c. they help evaluate the effectiveness of programs
    • d. a, b, and c

    7. In some districts, the performance of students on state standards tests is linked to the teacher’s

    • a. salary
    • b. contract
    • c. input
    • d. a and b

  • IX. Creating Positive Relationships Between School and Society

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student understands the relationship between school and society.
    (A) support learning through advocacy
    (B) select school and community resources for professional growth
    (C) design activities to build support of family members, community members, and business and industry to promote learning
    (3) The student communicates effectively.
    (B) communicate effectively in situations with educators and parents or guardians

    Module Content

    Creating Positive Relationships Between School and Society is the ninth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains three TEA units of study.

    A. Learning in Society
    B. Learning Activities
    C. Effective Communication

    Refer to lesson Stories, Stories and More Stories for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/stories-stories-and-more-stories/

    Refer to lesson Service Learning with a Smile: Education and Training for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Module 9 Handouts

    —-

    A. Learning in Society

    More than ever because of many societal changes, support for family and community involvement in schools is critical for the success of students. It is also important to value input from communities so schools can prepare students with the skills and abilities they will need as business and community leaders for the future.

    Teachers should consider the various types of families represented by the children in each class.

    • Single-Parent Families
      As many as half the children in a class may come from single-parent families. This can mean accommodating their work schedules when scheduling conferences or events to involve parents at school. It affects the amount of time parents have to support their children at home. Teachers will need to keep in mind the conditions that exist in a student’s home when requiring extra supplies, fees, or other things you ask parents to provide. It may be important to find ways to support these parents.
    • Alternative Marriages and Couples
      Many children live with parents who are couples but not legally married. Some parents may be couples of the same sex. Some couples, married and not married, may create blended families. Other children may live in dual custody situations creating home environments that change every few days.
    • Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Parents
      These are parents or families whose English proficiency is minimal and they may also not be knowledgeable of cultural activities and social expectations of schools in the area. These language and cultural barriers may it difficult for them to help their children and get involved in the school. They may have misconceptions about how schools operate and be fearful of asking for information.
    • Teenage Parents
      Teenage parents may be married or unmarried. They may be trying to finish schooling themselves and find it difficult to support their children as they work and go to school.
    • Fathers
      More and more fathers are assuming more parenting roles. At one time, mostly mothers were involved in the education of children, but now that is changing in our society.
    • Grandparents
      The number of grandparents acting as parents for their grandchildren is one of the largest growing realities. This may have been caused by drug use, abandonment, divorce, teenage pregnancy, mental and physical illness, and parents serving in the military. They may need special consideration as they support themselves and their grandchildren in a world that may be quite different from when they had their children in school.
    • Poverty
      Poverty can also create unique concerns for the families of children and their schools. Children may not have adequate nutrition, clothing, or transportation to get to school. The stress their parents face trying to survive limits how they can help their children. It may cause families to split up and live separately with other family members or in homeless facilities. It is difficult for children to bathe, wash their clothes, and eat, let alone do their homework or study.
    • Migrant families
      Families that move often because of their work also present concerns for schools and educators. The children may attend several schools in one year which make it difficult for them to do well on tests that measure adequate progress to promote to higher grades. They may also have trouble locating housing and other services such as medical care because of changing locations.
    • Other Changes in Society

    -Children are exposed to more violence and mature influences through television, the media, movies and music.
    -Social media is growing in use and has both positive and negative affects. It helps families stay in touch with other family members. It also brings a variety of messages into the lives of participants. Many students and their parents use it daily. It could be an effective way to communicate instantly.
    -Cell phones and their applications make communication easier, both verbally and visually.
    -The numbers of families experiencing desertion, child abuse, spousal battery, and alcohol and drug abuse continues to increase.

    Many of the children from these families will have limited access to resources for learning such as school supplies, books, and technology.

    The students in our schools come from many types of families. Teachers should realize that it is how the people in those families act and how the schools and communities support the children that affects success for their children.

    Possibly the most important thing for teachers to remember every day is that their students may have gone through incredible obstacles just to be at school. The teacher should help that student know that school is worth the trouble and can be one way to make their life and the lives of their future family better.

    —-
    B. Learning Activities

    Federal legislation such as the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and No Child Left Behind require some forms of parent involvement in schools. Every school should involve parents in developing policies that affect their children. These policies include:
    1. Improving and evaluating parent programs
    2. Informing parents about curriculum and assessments
    3. Funds available for transportation, child care, and home visits
    4. Parent-teacher communications and reports
    5. Literacy training for adults
    6. Training parents to train other parents
    7. Offering flexible times for parent meetings
    8. Establishing parent information resource centers
    9. Do service learning projects involving students, parents, and community members as partners.

    Refer to Education and Training lesson Service Learning With a Smile at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/service-learning-with-a-smile-education-and-training/

    Schools and teachers can be creative in developing activities that will make the most of interactions between the school and each family.
    There are unlimited possibilities for providing family involvement. Some of the basic types include:

    • Workshops to help families know what is going on at school, policies, and parenting information to help them do better with their efforts and resources.
    • Adult education about a variety of topics. Parents could help choose topics.
    • Programs to incorporate their skills and abilities as teachers, for example teaching others about their unique skills for cooking, learning basics of other languages or gardening.
    • Creating ways to get their input on decisions regarding curriculum changes and other policies.
    • Involving them in the classrooms.
    • Creating parenting libraries and materials centers where they can check out books, computers and other educational aids.
    • Linking them to support services for child care and car pools.
    • Performances and plays presented by students.
    • Newsletters, possibly translated by a parent when necessary.
    • Home learning materials
    • Web Sites for parents
    • Making a technology area available after school for families to use
    • Fairs and bazaars for fundraising
    • Potluck dinners, possibly at times where families can eat on their way home from work
      —-

    C. Effective Communication

    Communication with parents should occur frequently, not just when there are problems. Parents need information, positive reinforcement about their children, and the feeling that they can go to the school for support.

    There are many ways to get in touch with parents. At the beginning of school, it is a good idea to ask parents what will work best for them. Do they want emails, texts, post cards or letters? Do they have internet service and computers or do they expect the student to bring notes to them?

    The types of communications and ways to send them home will depend on the ages of the students. Calendars of school activities and newsletters may be helpful. Many schools use signs outside the school to announce school events. Small communities effectively use local newspapers. Facebook and Twitter work for parents who use social media.

    Parent Conferences

    When meeting with parents in conferences, teachers should make the parents feel comfortable and welcome. It is necessary to schedule the conference at a time when parents can come.

    Planning and Preparing for a Parent Conference

    • Plan ahead and be prepared
    • Provide documentation of student work
    • Obtain a translator if necessary
    • Accent the positive
    • Give families a chance to talk
    • Be calm, attentive, and positive
    • Listen
    • Use I-statements

    Ask what they think will help and what they think you could do to help.
    Help the parents know that you are a part of a team with them to help their child.
    Develop an action plan, what are we going to do?
    End on a positive note.
    Write comments from the conference down for a record.
    Follow up on the plan in a few days or weeks.

    Depending on the age of the students, it may be appropriate for students to also attend the conference. For more information about communicating with parents, refer to Practicum in Education and Training lesson Communicating With Parents at http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/communicating-with-parents/

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 9 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Parent Conference Form
    • Parent Meeting Reporter
    • Support Learning Through Advocacy

    —-

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Write a newsletter for the classroom where the student is doing their internship or the Practicum in Education and Training class to distribute to parents and administrators.
    • Design a post card and distribute to teachers so they can send brief, positive notes about students to parents.
    • Role play parent conferences. These could be videoed for student self-assessment.
    • Identify an issue in education and create an advocacy plan to support it. This could also be used for FCCLA STAR event competition in the Advocacy event.
    • Plan a family night where practicum students could present booths with information, do storytelling, and show videos they have made.
    • Do service learning projects that incorporate parents, families and community members as partners. An example could be creating multicultural exhibits for the local museum with parents providing items to display about their culture.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    • Teacher Tools and Templates
      At the Education World: A Teacher’s Best Friend website, there are many resources. This link has templates for graphic organizers, calendars, and parent newsletters.
      http://www.educationworld.com/tools_templates/index.shtml
    • Texas Legislature Site
      This site is the link for the Texas House of Representatives and the Texas Senate. It has all legislative reports and provides ways to communicate with legislators and learn about current and pending legislation.
      http://www.legis.state.tx.us/Home.aspx

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. ____________is an underlying factor that leads to many other problems in many families.

    • a. Immigration
    • b. Poverty
    • c. Homeschooling
    • d. Alternative marriages

    2. Federal legislation with No Child Left Behind requires

    • a. budgets
    • b. better attendance
    • c. parental involvement
    • d. state mandates

    3. __________________with parents should occur frequently, not just when there are problems.

    • a. Communication
    • b. Training
    • c. Workshops
    • d. Videos

    4. When teachers have a parent conference, they should remember to talk and

    • a. listen
    • b. think about their nonverbal communication
    • c. be defensive
    • d. a and b

    5. Culturally diverse parents may hesitate to get involved at school because

    • a. they don’t understand English
    • b. they are not knowledgeable of customs
    • c. they don’t think it is important
    • d. a and b

    6. The number of _______________caring for children is one of the largest growing groups of caregivers for children.

    • a. migrant workers
    • b. teenage fathers
    • c. grandparents
    • d. teachers

    7. Important tips to consider when planning parent involvement include

    • a. flexible times
    • b. flexible meeting places
    • c. using technology
    • d. a, b, and c

  • X. Professional Development

    TEKS Addressed

    (9) The student continues development as a teaching or training professional.
    (A) identify strategies and resources for the professional development of educators or trainers
    (B) demonstrate teacher or trainer characteristics that promote ongoing professional development
    (C) use research and assessment to improve teaching or training
    (D) develop a professional growth plan

    Module Content

    Professional Development is the tenth unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains four TEA units of study.

    A. Educator development strategies
    B. Professional development characteristics
    C. Teaching improvements
    D. Professional growth plan

    Refer to lesson Communicating with Parents for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/communicating-with-parents

    Refer to lesson What a Wonderful Teacher You Will Be for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-a-wonderful-teacher-you-will-be

    Refer to lesson Using Student Assessment Data for additional activities, idea and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/using-student-assessment-data

    Module 10 Handouts

    —-

    A. Educator Development Strategies

    Quality teachers are the single greatest factor in student success. When teachers know the subject matter, understand how students learn, and use effective methods, it increases student achievement. Teachers must be prepared when they begin teaching and they must continue to improve their knowledge and skill every year.

    Public School Teachers

    Federal requirements mandate the following for teachers in every public school classroom in all fifty states:

    • Bachelor’s degree
    • Subject matter coursework
    • Pedagogical coursework
    • Clinical experience

    Each state can also define additional requirements or alternative methods for certification. This information for the state of Texas can be found at The Texas Education Agency (TEA) web site:
    http://tea.texas.gov/Texas_Educators/Certification/Initial_Certification/

    Business and Industry Trainers

    In many cases, trainers for business and industry may be people who exhibit a high level of skill for the information being taught. The requirements for trainers are determined by various industries. A college degree may or may not be required. Experience and ability to work with people will be essential.

    Early Childhood Teachers

    Teachers who work with young children in child care programs need training but a college degree may not be required. This will depend on the program. People may start working in child care while they obtain training to advance into a two-year certification degree and eventually on to a bachelor’s level college degree.

    —-

    B. Professional Development Characteristics

    Teachers and trainers should be positive role-models, exemplifying what they teach. All teachers should be good students.
    Characteristics that promote ongoing professional development are:

    • continuous learners
    • focused on improving classroom practice
    • look for ways to increase student performance
    • involved and centered on the work of teaching

    This includes tasks such as:

    • planning
    • preparing
    • organizing
    • evaluating student work
    • developing and reviewing curriculum
    • demonstrating problem-solving
    • analyzing personal performance
    • follows rules at the local, state, and national levels
    • exhibit professional behavior and appearance

    —-

    C. Teaching Improvements

    Teachers can continue to improve their teaching by participating in professional in-service opportunities. Some of these are:

    • Mentoring with local teachers
    • Attending required in-service opportunities at the district level
    • Obtaining advanced degrees
    • Attending professional conferences
    • Obtaining technology training
    • Organizing subject-area team meetings
    • Organizing grade-level meetings
    • Asking for support from master teachers
    • Preparing with advanced certifications, such as ESL or reading
    • Attending training at the Region Service Centers
    • Accessing online information and activities such as professional readings and videos

    These programs are essential because needs of students and subject matter are constantly changing.

    It is helpful for students in education and training classes to also attend workshops and conferences when possible. One way for them to get training experience is to conduct training for teachers at their school. Teachers will often pay more attention to students than other trainers.
    —-

    D. Professional Growth Plan

    Teachers must have evaluations. This could include creating a professional growth plan. Each teacher or student should create personal goals and plan ways to accomplish those goals. A school or school district may also add specific goals to strive towards.

    Students and teachers could begin to develop a professional growth plan with self-reflection process. This could involve reviewing personal journals they have written about their teaching experiences, feedback from students and parents, collections of plan and other work and analyses from classroom observations made by others.

    When developing plans for the future, students should consider their personal interests, the type of subjects they like to teach as well as what grade level they prefer. Another consideration is the location of an ideal school for them and whether they are interested in working with students of specific cultures or with other special needs.

    The Professional Growth Plan might include:

    1. Self-reflection information
    2. An assessment of their school and leadership accomplishments
    3. The degrees or licenses they would need to reach their goal
    4. Collaboration with other educators for information and suggestions
    5. A timeline for each part of the plan
    6. Plan to review and revise the plan periodically to evaluate progress.
    7. Document accomplishments with evidence of progress such as grade reports, awards, diplomas and other projects.

    The Professional Development Appraisal System (PDAS) is a teacher evaluation system created by the Texas Education Agency. Its goal is to advance the level of professional practice of teaching in Texas. The evaluation criteria incorporate learner-centered proficiencies and promote continuous professional development. More information is available at:
    http://www4.esc13.net/pdas/

    Students should be aware that this process is a part of most professional careers.

    Another important part of being a professional educator is to be active in organizations that support education. Refer to Professional Development Opportunities and Professional Organizations at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/teachers-corner/

    —-

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 10 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • My Career Path
    • Why I Want to Teach

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students create and present workshops for teachers at the school. Possible topics could be “How to Do Service Learning” or “What to Look For to Prevent Bullying.”
    • Students could interview administrators to determine how they determine what types of in-service program to provide for their staff members.
    • Make a survey for teachers to ask what types of in-service they feel they need and what programs have been most beneficial. Students could make a report with graphs to share with administrators.
    • Interview teachers using the My Career Path handout.
    • Write summaries of the information from the teacher My Career Path interviews and create ways to share the information with other students, such as speeches, posters, or videos.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    Videos

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Working as a trainer in business and industry may require

    • a. work experience in the field
    • b. a degree
    • c. ability to work with people
    • d. a, b, and c

    2. Professional characteristics that teachers and trainers should possess are

    • a. being continuous learners
    • b. being good students
    • c. complaining about changes
    • d. a and b

    3. ___________-__________ is an important part of a professional growth plan.

    • a. Self-reflection
    • b. College licenses
    • c. Pay raises
    • d. PDAS

    4. Teachers are role-models and should always follow the

    • a. other teachers
    • b. rules, local, state and national
    • c. least restrictive path
    • d. internet suggestions

    5. Additional training can be inexpensive by taking advantage of

    • a. online training and courses
    • b. district level workshops
    • c. training at the region service center
    • d. a, b, and c

    6. A professional growth plan usually requires

    • a. review and revisions
    • b. documentation of progress
    • c. advanced degrees
    • d. a and b

    7. PDAS stands for

    • a. Public Domain Assessment System
    • b. Professional Development Appraisal System
    • c. Professional Development Assessment System
    • d. Professional Development Assistance System

  • XI. Documenting Success/End of Course Project Options Lesson/Course Outline

    TEKS Addressed

    (A) update a professional portfolio to include (i) attainment of technical skill competencies (ii) licensures or certifications (iii) recognitions, awards, and scholarships (iv) extended learning experiences such as community service and active participation in career and technical student organizations and professional organizations
    (v) abstract of key points of the practicum (vi) resumé (vii) samples of work
    (viii) evaluation from the practicum supervisor
    (D) create a personal career plan in preparation for a career in the field of education or training
    (1) The student explores the teaching and training profession.
    (B) present the portfolio to all interested stakeholders such as in a slide or poster presentation

    Module Content

    Documenting Success is the eleventh unit of study in the Practicum of Education and Training Course. This section contains three TEA units of study.

    A. Evidence of professional skills
    B. Career plan
    C. Presentation of portfolio

    Refer to the lesson Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/maximize-your-job-search-with-a-career-portfolio/

    Refer to lesson Educational Support Staff: Partners in Creating a Strong Learning Community for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/educational-support-staff-partners-in-creating-a-strong-learning-community/

    Refer to lesson Show Yourself Off: Write a Résumé for additional activities, ideas and resources at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/show-yourself-off-write-a-resume/
    Module 11 Handouts

    —-
    A. Evidence of Professional Skills

    A portfolio is a visual representation of the person who creates it. It is a place to collect and keep evidence of accomplishments, experiences, examples of work. Portfolios can be used for personal reflection, assessment and evaluation, in applying for scholarships, jobs and promotions.

    A portfolio should be a work in progress or something that is reviewed, revised and renewed. The portfolio should be professional and creative. It is a place to showcase the student or teacher and what they have done and plan to accomplish.

    There are several ways to present the portfolio information. The traditional format is a notebook or binder with sections to organize the information. Currently, the electronic or digital portfolio is becoming an effective way to present and organize information that can be easily stored, shared with others, and revised. This is an appealing format for those who have technology resources and skills to do it. The final choice is some type of combination of these methods, such as a notebook with both printed and digital files. The entire collection could be scanned and stored on travel or jump drive.

    List of suggestions to include:

    Education

    • Transcripts, diplomas, certificates, licenses
    • Recognitions, awards, honors, scholarships
    • Internships, special projects
    • Evaluation from the practicum supervisor and the course instructor
    • Service Learning activities
    • Evidence of their career and technical student organization activities
    • Lesson plans, writing samples
    • Their Personal Philosophy of Education
    • Workshops, seminars, conferences attended

    Activities

    • Leadership positions held
    • Hobbies or interests, participation in sports
    • Volunteer activities
    • Organizations joined
    • Public speaking presentations or competitions
    • Awards
    • Travel

    Work-Related Activities

    • Résumé (Use the Résumé Template Handout to prepare a simple resume and refer to the Practicum in Education and Training lesson Show Yourself Off: Write a Résumé at
      http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/show-yourself-off-write-a-resume/
    • Performance appraisals, grade reports
    • Letters of recommendation
    • Accomplishments, newspaper stories
    • Military Training
    • Jobs
    • Career Plan

    Personal Qualities or Strengths

    • Strengths, teamwork and people skills
    • Family contributions, helping with other siblings, work at home, managing a family

    As the student knows what to collect, they need to decide how to illustrate it in the portfolio. For example, they may have a photo of them accepting an award. Other ideas are to make a short video showing them teaching or doing service learning activities.

    There are many technology resources available for students to use in making a portfolio. Watch the following YouTube video, ePortfolio for Starters, for ideas:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6B3tujXlbdk

    Review the following site that provides an excellent summary of Google Apps for ePortfolios.
    http://electronicportfolios.com/google/

    Use the Handout Portfolio Checklist to help students collect information and plan a portfolio.

    —-

    B. Career Plan

    The Career Plan is a tool that helps students and teachers consider the options that exist in teaching and training. It can be recorded on a document that will be a work in progress as students make choices about their future in education.

    It would include types of additional training, degrees required and the other avenues they might pursue, such as summer internships and part-time employment while going to college.

    Use the handout Career Plan to help students organize their future plans.

    —-

    C. Presentation of Portfolio

    Students and teachers should think about ways they will use their portfolio as they develop it. It can be used to prepare for and take to interviews for jobs and scholarships. It can be continued to represent them as they go into college and throughout their career. The portfolio will also be evaluated as part of the course requirement for Practicum in Education and Training.

    There are many interesting and creative presentation formats. Students should be encouraged to research ways to make presentations and develop a style that best presents their materials and plans. Ideas include:

    • Slideshow, PowerPoint, or Prezi
    • Video
    • Demonstration of components of their ePortfolio

    The presentation should include both visual and written information. The student should practice before presenting to instructors, their internship supervising teachers, counselors, school administrators, potential employers, or college representatives.

    Another place to consider using a portfolio presentation is during job interviews. Refer to Practicum in Education and Training lesson Empowering Your Job Skills at
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-3/

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers:

    Module 11 Handouts

    Every Education and Training program is different. Below is a list of handouts/graphic organizers you can use or adapt to meet the needs of your students.

    • Career Plan
    • Résumé Template
    • Portfolio

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Interview a variety of teachers about their path to becoming a teacher. Use the Career Plan form to record their responses. Students could also ask for their suggestions or advice. They might ask “what would you change about your career planning?”
    • Students could plan and conduct workshops on topics related to documenting success, such as “How to Make a Portfolio”, “How to Prepare for Interviews”, or “What to Consider in Career Planning?” These could be taught to younger students, at FCCLA meetings, or possibly at job and career fairs.
    • Assign students to experiment with at least three of the Google Docs Apps for making ePortfolios.
    • Have students work in teams to make videos or PowerPoint presentations about using technology to make portfolios or career plans.
    • Video students as they practice presenting their portfolios. Have them do self-assessments of their video.
    • Find a résumé template online and make a resume. Send a copy of the résumé to the student’s email. At any time, they can download a copy, revise it, and print one to use in job interviews or for scholarship applications.

    Resources and References

    Textbooks

    • Armstrong, D. (2009). Teaching today. Saddle River New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Ready, set, teach! Curriculum Guide. 2003.
    • Curriculum Center for FCS. Reaching to teach. 2005.
    • Feeney, S., Moravcik, E., Nolte, S., and Christensen, D. (2009) Who am i in the lives of children? Boston, Massachusetts: Pearson.
    • Morrison, G. (2009) Early childhood education today. Upper Saddle Rover, New Jersey: Pearson.
    • Powel, S. (2010`). S. Texas Tech University Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences (Ed.), Putting it all together: education and training. Boston. Massachusetts: Pearson.

    Websites

    • Coaching Teachers to Be Effective Instructors
      This article published on the Harry and Rosemary Wong site, teachers.net, describes a coaching program that increases retention rates for new teachers.
      http://teachers.net/wong/SEP11/
    • Confronting the Crisis in Teacher Training
      An Edutopia article and list of resources and videos that identifies issues in preparing teachers for successful careers.
      http://www.edutopia.org/building-a-better-teacher

    YouTube™

    • e-Portfolios For Starters
      A creative video about the e-portfolio.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6B3tujXlbdk
    • Free Résumé Templates in Microsoft Word
      Uploaded by TechLinkOnline on Jun 2, 2010
      Ways to create your résumé in Microsoft Word with free résumé templates. There are many résumé templates to choose from.
      http://youtu.be/zOgunk36lzw

    Practicum in Education and Training Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Portfolios can be presented

    • a. as a notebook
    • b. as a web page
    • c. with printed and digital files
    • d. a combination of a, b, and c

    2. Portfolios can be helpful in

    • a. only for high school grading
    • b. scholarship applications and job interviews
    • c. developing continued professional development
    • d. b and c

    3. Portfolios should be

    • a. reviewed
    • b. revised
    • c. renewed
    • d. a, b, and c

    4. A Career Plan might include

    • a. additional training needed
    • b. summer internships
    • c. parental expectations
    • d. a and b

    5. Experience to include on a résumé could include

    • a. helping with younger brothers and sisters
    • b. managing a family
    • c. salary requirements
    • d. a and b

    6. When preparing to present a portfolio, students should

    • a. proofread the documents for errors
    • b. assume everything will work correctly with technology
    • c. practice presenting
    • d. a and c

    7. Strategies to use in exploring the teaching and training profession might include

    • a. interviewing other school personnel
    • b. watching videos online about educators
    • c. doing career aptitude assessments
    • d. a, b, and c

    End of Course Lessons

    An excellent way to end the semester or school year is with a culminating course project. See End of Course Project Options Lesson for Practicum in Education and Training
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/end-of-course-project-options-practicum-in-education-and-training/

    Culminating activities at the end of the course give students an opportunity to reflect and apply all of their knowledge and skills into an end of course project.

    • Involve the entire Practicum in Education and Training class in identifying a topic and creating a festival to teach about it throughout the entire school district. Each student could have different responsibilities for different grade levels including developing activities, creating videos, communicating to other staff, schools, and throughout the community. Topics might include history of the community, cultural diversity in the area, or conservation of natural resources.

    This type of activity teaches skills for teaching as well as 21st Century skills of teamwork, collaboration, cooperation, creativity, and communication.

    The month of May is a good time to conduct this type of program after the academic STAAR tests are over.

    • Have each student select a different country in the world. Throughout the year, provide time for students to research topics about education and life for young people in that country. At the end of the year, each student decides how to teach the other students about their country. They could also teach the information to other grade levels.

    Students might make displays, bulletin boards, videos, or write books to teach their information.

    After instruction, Practicum in Education and Training students could compare education throughout the world to education in their community, state, and nation. Global awareness is another 21st Century attribute.

    Practicum in Education and Training Course Outline
    The lessons in this course may be used in any sequence. The suggested sequence order is based on the Scope and Sequence for the course.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/2013/06/23/practicum-in-education-and-training-course-outline/

  • Quiz

    Practicum in Education and Training Online Course

    Progress:

    1.TEKS stands for

    2. CTE stands for

    3. A teacher's philosophy of education

    4. Characteristics of teachers are

    5. _________________is a good form of learning, especially with vocabulary.

    6. To prepare a philosophy of education, students need to

    7. A philosophy

    8. Assess is

    9. The one characteristic that guarantees success in teaching is

    10. Effective strategies for dealing with bullying include:

    11. ELL refers to

    12. Students may need to work with a word ____________times before they understand it well enough to use it correctly.

    13. Another word for clarity is ____________.

    14. Print rich classrooms provide

    15. An important skill for success in writing is ____________.

    16. The four areas of development include:

    17. Developmentally appropriate describes learning activities provided that are at the correct level for a students'

    18. ___________believed all people should learn to read so they could read and understand the _Bible_ for themselves

    19. The Theory of Multiple Intelligences

    20. Comenius created

    21. Most classes contain students

    22. Learning about theories helps

    23. Children should be taught rules and behaviors for

    24. Teachers should provide a safe emotional climate at school

    25. Professional teachers consider the way they

    26. When creating class rules, teachers should

    27. Teachers should demonstrate

    28. _______are the major keys to successful learning.

    29. Since the Internship or Field-Based experience component of the Education and Training Cluster may involve students traveling to other campuses, it is important to obtain approval from

    30. Intern students could be identified in other school areas and classroom by wearing

    31. Students can document, assess and reflect on their Intern experiences with

    32. Students are representing the school district and must be ___________about what they see and hear.

    33. All other students, especially younger ones, consider the Interns to be _________.

    34. Issues in Education and Training policies might include

    35. The Internship component of Practicum in Education and Training allows students to _____________all of the knowledge and skills they have acquired in other classes.

    36. Students will devise instructional methods the align with the ____________.

    37. __________are broad, general statements about what is to be learned.

    38. Teachers should use a variety of instructional strategies because

    39. Learner __________is important to guide selection and adjustment of instructional strategies.

    40. Teaching, learning, and evaluating are a __________cycle.

    41. Praise given to students should

    42. ________________evaluate technology applications to determine their effectiveness for practical classes.

    43. Teachers need to devise and monitor rules for __________________safety.

    44.Teachers should check the _____________ policy before allowing students to use the internet.

    45. Everything students read on the internet

    46. Using free Web classroom tools

    47. All students need to know and practice

    48. Technology applications may be excellent strategies for

    49. Assessment is directly connected to ________where results are closely monitored by state and federal government agencies.

    50. _________________a student's efforts is one of the most difficult parts of the teaching process.

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