Practicum in Culinary Arts Online Course

  • Practicum in Culinary Arts Online Course Introduction

    Culinary Arts

    (1) This course is a unique practicum that provides occupationally specific opportunities for students to participate in a learning experience that combines classroom instruction with actual business and industry career experiences.
    Practicum in Culinary Arts integrates academic and career and technical education; provides more interdisciplinary instruction; and supports strong partnerships among schools, businesses, and community institutions with the goal of preparing students with a variety of skills in a fast-changing workplace.

    (2) Students are taught employability skills, which include job-specific skills applicable to their training plan, job interview techniques, communication skills, financial and budget activities, human relations, and portfolio development.
    Practicum in Culinary Arts is relevant and rigorous, supports student application of academic standards, and effectively prepares students for college and career success.

    (3) Instruction may be delivered through school-based laboratory training or through work-based delivery arrangements such as cooperative education, mentoring, and job shadowing.

    (4) Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experience such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Practicum in Culinary Arts is one of 9 courses in the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills


    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and seven (7) modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and valid email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com


    NOTE
    From the State Board of Education Certification
    Figure: 19 TAC §231.1(e)
    ASSIGNMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL PERSONNEL, PART I
    REQUIREMENTS FOR ASSIGNMENT OF TEACHERS

    • The school district is responsible for ensuring that each teacher assigned to this course has completed appropriate training in state and federal requirements regarding work-based learning and safety. This requirement is effective beginning with the 2010-2011 school year.

    This online course DOES NOT fulfill SBOE requirements but does serve as professional development for six (6) Continuing Professional Education Credits.

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Practicum in Culinary Arts for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-practicum-in-culinary-arts/

  • I. History of the Food Service Industry

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen.

    • (A) research famous chefs in history and note their major accomplishments
    • (B) identify global cultures and traditions related to food
    • (C) summarize historical entrepreneurs who influenced food service in the United States
    • (D) analyze how current trends in society affect the food science industry

    Module Content

    History of the Food Service Industry is the first unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Famous chefs
    • B. Entrepreneurs who influenced food service
    • C. Global cultures
    • D. Food traditions


    Refer to Historical Culinary Trendsetters for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/from-the-beginning-a-look-into-the-history-of-food-service/

    Refer to lesson Back to the Future – An Introduction to Sustainability in Food Service for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/back-to-the-future-an-introduction-to-sustainability-in-food-service/

    Module I Handouts

    A. Famous chefs

    The word chef is French for chief or short for chef de cuisine or chief of the kitchen. Becoming a professional chef requires both study and hard work.

    The title of chef implies someone who is a good cook with the skills and knowledge needed to run a commercial kitchen.

    Chefs fulfill many roles that include:

    • cook
    • leader
    • manager
    • artistic innovator
    • teacher and mentor

    They have a passion for quality food and service.

    Famous chefs in history include:

    • Marie-Antoine Careme (1784-1833) – defined the art of grand cuisine
    • Georges-Auguste Escoffier (1847-1935) – credited with refining grand cuisine into the more contemporary classical cuisine
    • Fernand Point (1897-1955) – created lighter sauces and used regional ingredients; also known as the father of French cuisine
    • Julia Child (1912-2004) – made popular French cuisine and techniques available to the American public
    • Paul Bocuse (1926-) – created lighter, healthier dishes that still reflect classical French flavors
    • Alice Waters (1944-) – provides dishes that use only seasonal, local products at the height of freshness
    • Ferdinand Metz (1941-) – has helped to foster professionalism and innovation to chefs

    Be sure to visit Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian and view and listen as she shares her passions, philosophies, and now her kitchen for everyone to view. Allow your students to view cooking tools from the 1940’s and more.

    B. Entrepreneurs who influenced food service

    An entrepreneur is a self-motivated person who creates and runs a business. They take a personal and financial risk. The foodservice industry offers many prospects for people wanting to open their own businesses.

    Rewards of entrepreneurship include:

    • be your own boss
    • experience
    • contacts
    • financial
    • personal and professional pride

    Famous food service entrepreneurs include:

    • The Delmonico brothers (1837) – began the first restaurant chain
    • Fred Harvey (1876) – builds one of the earliest nationwide chain restaurants
    • Walter Scott (1872) – sells dinners from a horse-drawn wagon, thus the beginning of the diner
    • Roy Allen and Frank Wright (1921) – create the first franchise company with A & W Root Beer
    • Walter Anderson and E. W. Ingram (1921) – open the first chain of quick-service hamburger restaurants known as White Castle
    • Howard Johnson (1935) – begins franchising restaurants with standardized menus and designs
    • Ray Kroc (1954) – partners with McDonald brothers to franchise their small hamburger restaurant
    • Joe Baum (1957) – opens the first sophisticated theme restaurant, The Forum of the Twelve Caesars in New York City
    • Frank Carney (1958) – creates the Pizza Hut franchise
    • Norman Brinker(1966) – opens the first Steak and Ale
    • Bill Darden (1968) – opens the first Red Lobster
    • Zev Siegel, Jerry Baldwin, and Gordon Bowker (1971) – open Starbucks in Seattle, Washington
    • Richard Melman (1971) – founds Lettuce Entertain You Enterprises, a multifaceted restaurant group
    • Ruth Fertel (1977) – starts the first national fine-dining chains with Ruth’s Chris Steak House

    C. Global cultures

    The world of food is becoming smaller every day. Diners today are rarely limited to local dishes and food products.

    Through travel and the media, diners are exposed to an ever-widening range of dishes from around the world. Restaurateurs and chefs are constantly exploring the world of food for new and interesting items to put on their menus.

    Chefs are introducing from around the world, new:

    • flavors
    • ingredients
    • techniques

    View videos from the American Museum of Natural History:

    • Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture
      The new exhibition “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” explores the complex human food web and examines the history, science, and culture of what we eat and how. In the coming years, reshaping the world’s food system to sustainably feed a growing population will be an immense and global project.
      http://youtu.be/bPImnEJ9CHc
    • Our Global Kitchen Introduction
      Take a journey around the world and through time. Stroll through an ancient market, cook a virtual meal, peek inside the dining rooms of illustrious individuals—and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time.
      http://youtu.be/a1dQlyNVpTI

    D. Food traditions

    Tradition, cultural pride, and enjoyment keep our food customs stable from generation to generation.

    Many food traditions continue because people enjoy them. Some food customs are handed down as matter of cultural pride. This custom is part of a people’s tradition and identity.

    Keeping food customs can also provide a sense of security. Food traditions help people feel that they belong to something larger than themselves.

    View video about celebrating family traditions:

    • Celebrate
      Food does more than keep us alive. It connects us to the land, to cultural heritage, and to each other.
      http://youtu.be/2n4F3p1x_nc

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • Back to the Future Consensogram Template
    • Back to the Future Notes
    • Back to the Future Notes (Key)
    • Culinary Trendsetters: Famous Chefs and Entrepreneurs Presentation
    • FCCLA Planning Process Worksheet
    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Julia Child’s Kitchen Objects
    • Julia Child’s Kitchen Objects (Key)
    • Rubric for Community Leadership and Teamwork Experience
    • Rubric for Electronic Display – Glogster™ EDU Poster
    • Rubric for Multimedia Presentation – Prezi™
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation
    • Sustainability in Food Service – Where We Stand Today E-zine Article Review
    • Sustainability in Food Service – Where We Stand Today E-zine Article Review (Key)
    • Sustainability Vocabulary Quiz
    • Sustainability Vocabulary Quiz (Key)
    • Sustainable Food Service Webquest
    • Sustainable Food Service Webquest (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • To find out more details about famous chefs and entrepreneurs, assign a research presentation.
    • Visit Julia Child’s Kitchen at the Smithsonian to view an interactive website displaying her kitchen.
    • If time permits, plan a lab with foods from your student’s cultural backgrounds and traditions.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • Celebrate
      Food does more than keep us alive. It connects us to the land, to cultural heritage, and to each other.
      http://youtu.be/2n4F3p1x_nc
    • Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture
      The new exhibition “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” explores the complex human food web and examines the history, science, and culture of what we eat and how. In the coming years, reshaping the world’s food system to sustainably feed a growing population will be an immense and global project.
      http://youtu.be/bPImnEJ9CHc
    • Our Global Kitchen Introduction
      Take a journey around the world and through time. Stroll through an ancient market, cook a virtual meal, peek inside the dining rooms of illustrious individuals—and consider some of the most challenging issues of our time.
      http://youtu.be/a1dQlyNVpTI

    History of the Food Service Industry Module One Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The word chef is French for:

    • a. manager
    • b. leader
    • c. chief
    • d. supervisor

    2. Who defined the art of grand cuisine?

    • a. Julia Child
    • b. Marie-Antoine Careme
    • c. Paul Bocuse
    • d. Georges-Auguste Escoffier

    3. What year did Julia Child donate her kitchen to the National Museum of American History?

    • a. 2001
    • b. 2004
    • c. 2012
    • d. 2000

    4. Who partners with the McDonald brothers to franchise their small hamburger restaurant?

    • a. Bill Darden
    • b. Fred Harvey
    • c. Frank Carney
    • d. Ray Kroc

    5. According to the video – Our Global Kitchen Introduction, from the American Museum of Natural History – our meals today are shaped by:

    • a. history, nature, commerce, and culture
    • b. history and nature
    • c. history and culture
    • d. history, traditions, and people

    6. Our food customs remain stable from generation to generation due to:

    • a. tradition
    • b. cultural pride
    • c. enjoyment
    • d. all of the above

  • II. Entry to the Job Market

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student uses employability skills to gain an entry-level job in a high-skill, high-wage, or high-demand field.

    • (A) identify employment opportunities
    • (B) demonstrate the application of essential workplace skills in the career acquisition process
    • (C) complete employment-related documents such as job applications and I-9 and W-4 forms
    • (D) demonstrate proper interview techniques in various situations

    (6) The student applies the use of self-development techniques and interpersonal skills to accomplish objectives.

    • (A) identify and practice effective interpersonal and team-building skills involving situations with coworkers, managers, and customers
    • (B) apply leadership and career development skills through participation in activities such as career and technical student organizations

    (3) The student demonstrates work ethics, employer expectations, interaction with diverse populations, and communication skills in the workplace.

    • (E) demonstrate ethical standards

    (8) The student evaluates personal attitudes and work habits that support career retention and advancement.

    • (A) analyze the future employment outlook in the occupational area
    • (B) describe entrepreneurial opportunities in the area of culinary arts
    • (C) compare rewards and demands for various levels of employment in the area of culinary arts
    • (D) evaluate strategies for career retention and advancement in response to the changing global workplace
    • (E) summarize the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees
    • (F) determine effective money management and financial planning techniques

    (9) The student identifies skills and attributes necessary for professional advancement.

    • (A) evaluate employment options, including salaries and benefits
    • (B) determine factors that affect career choices such as personal interests, abilities, priorities, and family responsibilities
    • (C) determine continuing education opportunities that enhance career advancement and promote lifelong learning
    • (D) demonstrate effective methods to secure, maintain, and terminate employment

    Module Content

    Entry to the job market is the second unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains fourteen TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Employment opportunities
    • B. Application process
    • C. Employment documents
    • D. Interview skills
    • E. Team building
    • F. Leadership and student organizations
    • G. Ethical standards
    • H. Employment outlook
    • I. Entrepreneurial opportunities
    • J. Rights and responsibilities
    • K. Benefits and salaries
    • L. Career choices
    • M. Maintaining employment
    • N. Employment termination

    Refer to Careers in the Food Industry: Connecting Education and Employment for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-the-food-industry-connecting-education-and-employment/

    A. Employment opportunities

    Employment in the foodservice industry is growing. This industry employs more people than any other private employment segment in the country.

    Networking
    Make use of all of your connections to reach your career goal.

    This can include:

    • friends
    • classmates
    • teachers
    • mentors
    • employers
    • coworkers
    • school organizations

    Professional Organizations
    Made up of people employed in the field and may post job openings. They network on a state, national, or international level and focus on the industry in general or in specialized areas.

    A membership fee may be required but the benefits of being a member can outweigh the money spent on the fee.

    Professional organizations offer:

    • publications
    • job listings
    • job placement services
    • scholarships
    • network opportunities

    Trade Publications
    Magazines or newsletters produced by and for members of the foodservice industry. They contain helpful articles on all parts of the industry. Many list job openings.

    Subscriptions are often included as part of a membership in professional organizations.

    Employment Agencies
    Businesses that put employers in touch with potential employees.

    Employment agencies keep lists of foodservice job openings but may charge a fee for their services.

    Internet
    Provides access to food industry websites and employment applications.

    Benefits of an online search:

    • can be done at any time of the day or night
    • provides a broad range of options
    • demonstrates proficiency with technology

    Become familiar with The Texas Work Prep Learning Management System (LMS) designed and hosted by the Texas Workforce Commission.

    • The Job Hunter’s Guide Course
      This course will allow the student to gain knowledge and skills to obtain employment. The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon completion of this course. Certificate can be printed and added to their professional portfolio.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm

    Assign your student to take the course and inform them that this is an interactive free assessment that will allow them to identify their job values, interests, aptitudes, and skills assessments as well as assist them in preparing a résumé and teaching them interview skills.

    This assessment consists of:

    • Job Hunting Model
      • Assess Yourself
      • Prepare Yourself
      • Search for a Job
      • Contact Employers
      • Interview
      • Maintain Work

    Students must complete all six sections and successfully pass a short quiz to receive their printable certificate.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    B. Application process

    Request, complete and return a job application to the place of business.

    Application forms often request information about education, references, and work experiences.

    Keep an updated a list of:

    • references
    • dates of employment
    • schools attended
    • dates attended
    • certifications and/or degrees

    It is important to be neat when filling out the form. Fill out in black ink or type and keep it free from stains and dirt.

    Additional points:

    • read the form completely before beginning to fill in information
    • match information given on the résumé
    • answer all required questions

    Students may practice filling in the Employment Application or any other application available.

    C. Employment documents

    Students will have to present required documents before they are employed.

    These can include:

    • employment eligibility verification (I – 9)
    • social security card
    • driver’s license or photo I.D. card

    The Form I – 9 (updated) is a federal form to determine whether employees are legally eligible to work in the United States.

    D. Interview skills

    Refer to Empowering Your Job Skills for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-4/

    The job interview is an important hiring tool used by employers. They are looking to find the most suitable person for the position. Potential employees have a chance to “sell themselves” and show the interviewer what they have to offer.

    Key points for an interview:

    • punctuality – arrive on time
    • appearance – dress appropriately, neat, and clean
    • personal hygiene – cleanliness and neatness are essential
    • positive attitude – smile and stay calm under pressure
    • good manners – be considerate and thoughtful

    Students should prepare for the interview by researching the potential employer. Give a firm handshake when meeting the interviewer. Answer questions and provide work experiences.

    After the interview, students should send a thank you letter thanking the interviewer for the opportunity and indicate their continued interest in the job.

    Allow students to practice interview skills with each other so students may feel confident and comfortable for the real interview.

    View short video on interviewing:

    E. Team building

    Foodservice workplaces focus on working as team. Employees must practice good teamwork skills.

    Teamwork skills include:

    • keeping a positive attitude
    • respecting yourself and others
    • accepting responsibility for your actions
    • learning from your mistakes
    • taking care of your appearance
    • practicing empathy

    Empathy is the skill of thinking about what it would be like in another’s place.

    F. Leadership and student organizations

    Besides basic skills and a strong work ethic, employers also look for employees who have leadership skills. Leadership is the ability to motivate others to cooperate in doing a common task.

    Good leaders:

    • provide direction
    • lead consistently
    • influence others
    • motivate others
    • coach and develop others
    • anticipate change
    • foster teamwork

    Leadership skills can be gained through experience. Opportunities to build and strengthen leadership skills exist through student organizations.

    Participation in student organizations can contribute to a more enriching learning experience.

    Students will:

    • gain leadership qualities and skills that make them more marketable to employers and universities
    • demonstrate the ability to appreciate someone else’s point of view
    • interact with professionals to learn about their different industries
    • explore creative interests, share ideas, and collaborate with others
    • take risks, build confidence, and grow creatively
    • learn valuable skills while speaking or performing in front of an audience
    • learn the importance of civic responsibility and involvement
    • build relationships with instructors, advisors, students, and other members of the community who share similar backgrounds and views

    Teachers: Make an effort to participate in student organizations to build leadership skills for your students.

    G. Ethical standards

    Ethical behavior means doing what is right. It is your internal guidelines to distinguish right from wrong.

    The following questions can be asked to recognize the ethical course of action:

    • Does the choice comply with the law?
    • Is the choice fair to those involved?
    • Has the choice been communicated to me honestly?
    • Will I feel embarrassed or guilty about the choice?

    Behaving ethically also means taking responsibility. If students make a mistake, they should admit it. They will learn from their mistakes and make better choices.

    H. Employment outlook

    According to the National Restaurant Association, there are more than 13.1 million people in the United States working in the foodservice industry, the second largest private sector employer.

    In the next decade, restaurants will add 1.3 million positions outpacing the national employment growth by 2.4%.

    The majority of foodservice jobs provide a service, such as cooking food or waiting on customers. Customers are willing to spend time and money for a pleasant dining experience. This means foodservice establishments want to hire well-trained employees.

    For more information, visit:

    View YouTube™ video:

    • 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast
      SVP of Research Hudson Riehle summarizes the National Restaurant Association’s 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast.
      http://youtu.be/Nq7h_f5QpcA

    I. Entrepreneurial opportunities

    An entrepreneur is a self-motivated person who creates and runs a business. Through a lot of hard work and commitment, an entrepreneur can make a dream come true.

    Listed below are some advantages and disadvantages to owning a food production business.

    Advantages:

    • ownership
    • job satisfaction
    • earning potential

    Disadvantages:

    • financial risk
    • competition
    • no guarantees

    Three options of restaurant ownership:

    • Independent
    • Chain
    • Franchise

    Independent restaurants have one or more owners and are not part of a national business.

    The owner is in control of:

    • concept
    • theme
    • style
    • food
    • company policies
    • sets menu prices
    • profits
    • expenses

    Chain restaurants have two or more locations that sell the same products and are operated by the same company. They are run by a manager-employee.

    Chain restaurants have the same:

    • atmosphere
    • service
    • menu
    • quality of food

    Franchise restaurants sell an individual business owner the right to use the company’s:

    • name
    • logo
    • concept
    • product

    There are many other opportunities in foodservice for entrepreneurs such as foodservice consultants and employee recruiter.

    Foodservice consultants offer advice and information to other business owners and managers such as:

    • menu design
    • kitchen operations
    • pricing
    • cost control
    • marketing

    Employee recruiters help businesses find the right employees.

    J. Rights and responsibilities

    After a job is secured, there are some expectations on the part of both the employer and the employee.

    Employers
    Main responsibility is to make sure that employees are paid fairly. for the work they do.

    Workplace responsibilities include:

    • supply what is needed to do the job
    • provide safe working conditions
    • make sure employees are treated fairly

    Employees
    Main responsibility is to do the very best job possible for the employer.

    Workplace responsibilities include:

    • show up for work when scheduled and be on time
    • use work time responsibly
    • respect the business by learning and following employer’s rules
    • work safely
    • maintain a positive, enthusiastic attitude
    • complete each task assigned

    K. Benefits and salaries

    Benefits are services or payments provided by an employer in addition to wages.

    Common benefits that employers give to employees include:

    • health and accident insurance
    • paid vacation days
    • discounts on meals
    • life insurance
    • disability insurance
    • tuition reimbursement
    • savings and investment plans

    Salaries are usually determined by minimum wage or by:

    • level of experience
    • difficulty of work
    • competition

    L. Career choices

    Refer to On the Job – Food Service Careers for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/on-the-job-food-service-careers/

    Production Opportunities
    A traditional kitchen brigade system may be used in most foodservice operations to divide responsibilities for preparing food.

    Many restaurants also cross-train their employees by giving them work experience in many different tasks. Cross-training reduces the restaurant’s labor costs and results in fast service.

    Foodservice careers include:

    • LineCook/Station Cook – work on the food production line
    • Sous Chef – supervises and sometimes assists other chefs in the kitchen
    • Pastry Chef – responsible for making baked items
    • Prep Cook – prepares ingredients to be used by the line cooks
    • Garde Manger (or pantry chef) – responsible for preparing cold food items

    Utilize the The Occupational Outlook Handbook Teacher’s Guide and The Occupational Outlook Handbook to assist the students with their career search.
    http://www.bls.gov/ooh/About/Teachers-Guide.htm

    M. Maintaining employment

    Once you have secured employment, be sure to be:

    • responsible
    • reliable
    • flexible
    • honest

    Become familiar with The Texas Work Prep Learning Management System (LMS) designed and hosted by the Texas Workforce Commission.

    • Succeed at Work
      This course will help students enjoy their job and discusses ethics.
      The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon successful completion of this course. Certificate can be printed and added to their professional portfolio.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm

    Inform students that this is an interactive free assessment that will allow them to enjoy their job and learn more about ethics.

    • Succeed at Work Stages
      • Acting Self-Employed
      • Starting a New Job
      • Being an Excellent Employee (Work Ethics)
      • Living a Balanced Life
      • Enjoying Your Current Position

    After completing the course, students will be able to successfully pass a short quiz to receive their printable certificate.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    N. Employment termination

    If you must end your employment, always try to leave on good terms.

    Be sure to follow these steps:

    • give a two weeks’ notice
    • submit a letter of resignation
      • reason for leaving
      • thanking employer for experience
      • offering to train new employee

    Become familiar with The Texas Work Prep Learning Management System (LMS) designed and hosted by the Texas Workforce Commission.

    • Your Next Job
      This course will help yo move on to your next job.
      The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon successful completion of this course.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm

    Inform students that this is an interactive free assessment that will allow them cope with a job loss and move on to the next job.

    • Your Next Job
      • Job Loss Phases
      • Losing a Job
      • Coping with Your Feelings
      • Caring for Yourself and Your Family
      • Searching for a New Job
      • Landing a New Job

    After completing the course, students will be able to successfully pass a short quiz to receive their printable certificate.

    Stress the importance of having this type of documentation in their professional portfolio.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Note: There are many handouts too numerous and large to include in this section. Refer to the following lessons for handouts, graphic organizers, and more.

    Refer to Careers in the Food Industry: Connecting Education and Employment for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-the-food-industry-connecting-education-and-employment/

    Refer to Empowering Your Job Skills for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/empowering-your-job-skills-4/

    Refer to On the Job – Food Service Careers for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/on-the-job-food-service-careers/

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Assist students in securing their first job. Help them with their résumé, practice filling out applications (both on paper and online), and gathering information for their portfolio.
    • Allow students to practice interview skills with each other so they can become comfortable with the process.
    • Encourage your student to participate in a CTSO that you sponsor. Leadership skills and team building will be learned.
    • Assign a career research presentation so students may gather information for a career they are interested in.
    • Assign the three free Texas Work Prep interactive assessments. They will gather lots of information that can assist them as they pursue employment.
    • Praise, encourage, and motivate your students to be successful once they are employed.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Websites:

    YouTube™:

    • 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast
      SVP of Research Hudson Riehle summarizes the National Restaurant Association’s 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast.
      http://youtu.be/Nq7h_f5QpcA
    • Job Interview Tips for Teens
      For any job interview, it’s important to impress the interviewer from the moment you arrive. Learn what you should and should not do during the interview so you can avoid embarrassing faux pas!
      http://video.about.com/jobsearch/Job-Interview-Tips-for-Teens.htm

    Entry to the Job Market Module Two Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The foodservice industry employs more people than any other private employment segment in the country.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    2. What are the benefits of an online employment search?

    • a. can be done at any time of the day or night
    • b. provides a broad range of options
    • c. demonstrates proficiency with technology
    • d. all of the above

    3. Application forms often request information about education, references, and __________________.

    • a. comments
    • b. work experiences
    • c. reviews
    • d. family history

    4. Name the federal form that determines whether employees are legally eligible to work in the United States.

    • a. W-4
    • b. work visa
    • c. I – 9
    • d. passport

    5. According to the 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast, what is the fastest growing segment?

    • a. catering
    • b. fast food
    • c. fine dining
    • d. hotel restaurants

    6. A disadvantage to owning a food production business is:

    • a. job satisfaction
    • b. earning potential
    • c. financial risk
    • d. ownership

    7. How many weeks notice should an employee give their employer when terminating employment?

    • a. one
    • b. two
    • c. three
    • d. four

  • III. Food Handlers in the Work Place

    Chef Preparing Meal for Family

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student develops skills for success in the workplace.

    • (A) comprehend and model appropriate grooming and appearance for the workplace
    • (B) demonstrate dependability, punctuality, and initiative
    • (C) develop positive interpersonal skills, including respect for diversity
    • (D) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette in the workplace
    • (E) exhibit productive work habits, ethical practices, and a positive attitude
    • (F) demonstrate knowledge of personal and occupational health and safety practices in the workplace
    • (G) demonstrate the ability to work with the other employees to support the organization and complete assigned tasks
    • (H) prioritize work to fulfill responsibilities and meet deadlines
    • (I) evaluate the relationship of good physical and mental health to job success and personal achievement
    • (J) demonstrate effective verbal, non-verbal, written, and electronic communication skills
    • (K) apply effective listening skills used in the workplace

    (3) The student demonstrate work ethics, employer expectations, interaction with diverse populations, and communication skills in the workplace.

    • (A) illustrate how personal integrity affects human relations on the job
    • (B) demonstrate characteristics of successful working relationships such as teamwork, conflict resolution, self-control, and the ability to accept criticism
    • (C) analyze employer expectations
    • (D) demonstrate respect for the rights of others
    • (E) demonstrate ethical standards
    • (F) comply with organizational policies

    (5) The student applies ethical behavior standards and legal responsibilities within the workplace.

    • (A) research and compare published workplace policies
    • (B) apply responsible and ethical behavior
    • (C) summarize provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act
    • (D) describe the consequences of breach of confidentiality
    • (E) research laws related to culinary arts professions

    Module Content

    Food handlers in the work place is the third unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains seventeen TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Grooming and appearance
    • B. Dependability and initiative
    • C. Interpersonal skills
    • D. Personal etiquette
    • E. Business etiquette
    • F. Health issues
    • G. Safety practices
    • H. Listening skills
    • I. Personal integrity
    • J. Teamwork
    • K. Conflict resolution
    • L. Employer expectations
    • M. Ethical standards
    • N. Organizational skills
    • O. Workplace policy
    • P. Fair labor standards
    • Q. Confidentiality


    Refer to Laws and Regulations in the Food Service Industry for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/laws-and-regulations-in-the-food-service-industry/

    Refer to lesson What Would You Do? Ethical Behavior Standards for more activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-would-you-do-ethical-behavior-standards/

    Module III Handouts

    Module IIIb Handouts

    A. Grooming and appearance

    The chef uniform is a mark of professionalism. It contributes to working safely in the kitchen. The modern chef uniform is designed to provide maximum protection and comfort.

    • Chef jacket – designed to protect the cook from burns
      • double-breasted – the double layer protects the chest from the heat and can be reversed to hide stains
      • white – reflects heat, which helps keep the cook cool
      • long sleeves – protect the arms from splatters of hot grease or the intense heat of a grill
    • Chef pants – long pants protect the legs from burns
      • black and white checkered pants – hide stains
    • Apron – protects cooks from spills
      If a hot liquid spills on an apron, the employee can immediately lift the apron away from the body to minimize any burns.
    • Footwear – shoes should be solid, well constructed, and comfortable
      • closed toe shoes – will protect against a falling knife or heavy object
      • nonslip soles – will project against falls from a slippery floor
    • Toque – a chef’s hat that dates back to the 16th century
      Different heights may indicate rank
      • used as a hair restraint
    • Neckerchief – absorbs facial perspiration
    • Jewelry – does not belong in the kitchen
      • rings, necklaces, earrings, and bracelets – can get caught on moving equipment
      • piercings – can fall into food

    Wear this uniform with pride.

    View the video on a chef uniform.

    • A Professional Chef Uniform
      As a professional chef your uniform is your first line of defense for safety protection.
      http://youtu.be/4uPYHDwVwzU

    B. Dependability and initiative

    A student is dependable when other people can depend on what they do or say.

    A dependable employee is one who:

    • arrives to work on time
    • keeps personal matters separate from business matters
    • works a full shift
    • carries out a variety of assigned tasks without constant prompting
    • takes on extra work when necessary without complaint
    • gets enough rest to work effectively
    • maintains good personal physical and mental health

    Dependable people are more likely to advance on the job.

    The willingness to take on new tasks and levels of responsibility shows initiative.
    Initiative is the energy required to begin new tasks and see them through to completion.

    Workers with initiative do not wait to be told by their employers what to do next. They seek ways to improve their on-the-job performance.

    C. Interpersonal skills

    Refer to You Said What? for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/you-said-what/

    Also known as people skills. A person who possesses good interpersonal skills is a person who can generally relate to and work well with others.

    There are many ways to practice personal skills in the workplace:

    • Acknowledge guests
      • make eye contact
      • welcome guests with a smile and greeting
      • pay attention to guests’ concerns, questions, and body language
    • Show empathy
      • the act of showing understanding and sensitivity to someone else about a situation
    • Praise others
      • everyone likes to be praised and appreciated for his or her own efforts
    • Be aware of cultural differences
      • each person is unique and brings strengths and opportunities
      • different ways of:
        • doing things
        • looking at situations
        • levels of interaction
        • appropriate behavior between cultures
    • Be ethical, approachable, and professional
      • promotes teamwork
      • being open and approachable will create a smooth atmosphere

    D. Personal etiquette

    Good manners are the basis for personal etiquette.

    Saying:

    • Please
    • Thank you
    • Excuse me

    If an employee is considerate and thoughtful, the behavior implies that he or she will also act that way around coworkers and customers.

    E. Business etiquette

    Business etiquette is proper behavior for business situations.

    Examples include:

    • confident handshakes
    • introducing people correctly
    • wearing appropriate clothes

    View video on business etiquette:

    Knowing proper business etiquette can make the difference in making a sale or receiving a promotion.

    F. Health issues

    The energy and skills demanded in foodservice can be best achieved when you are in good physical and mental health.

    Foodservice careers often involve:

    • long hours on your feet
    • lifting heavy objects
    • disease spread by coworkers and customers
    • stress

    Recommendations for personal health:

    • get enough sleep and rest
    • exercise regularly to increase strength
    • see a doctor when ill
    • return to work when completely well

    G. Safety practices

    Many foodservice workplace accidents can be prevented.

    Safety begins by:

    • understanding everyday dangers in the kitchen
    • taking steps to prevent accidents
    • knowing what to do in the event of an accident or emergency
    • knowing who to contact in an emergency

    Many accidents happen due to carelessness.

    The risk for accident increases with

    • sharp knives
    • powerful machines
    • open flames
    • steam
    • boiling liquids

    Kitchen Injuries
    Most kitchen injuries are minor, heal quickly, and do not require additional medical care.

    Cuts – one of the most common injuries

    Safety practices include:

    • practice correct knife cutting skills
    • always carry a knife by your side and pointed downward
    • announce when you are carrying a knife
    • never leave a knife or sharp object in a dishwashing sink
    • never gesture with a knife
    • never try to catch a falling knife
    • use only sharp knives
    • use knives only for appropriate tasks

    Falls – slipping on a wet floor or tripping over a box can result in injuries.

    Safety practices include:

    • make sure spills are wiped up immediately
    • clean greasy floors immediately
    • do not place food or pots on the floor
    • do not run in the kitchen
    • apply nonslip floor mats
    • keep aisles clear
    • wear shoes with nonslip soles
    • put away ladders and stools when not in use

    Note to Teacher: The following video is graphic. Use caution if you decide to show it to students. Preview video and warn students of what may happen if they are not careful.

    Burns – most are minor and heal quickly.

    Safety practices include:

    • never use a damp or wet towel as a hot pad
    • never attempt to move anything hot that you cannot carry or lift comfortably
    • use a thick hot pad to protect your hands from hot pans
    • alert the dishwashing staff of a hot pan in the dishwater
    • say “HOT” when carrying a hot pan or liquid through the kitchen
    • avoid contact with steam when opening or lifting a lid of boiling liquid

    View video on how to prevent burns:

    • Preventing Burns
      Within a commercial kitchen you will be exposed to high temperatures that could cause injury to you. Always think safety and have a plan.
      http://youtu.be/5_1T0iLmOck

    Heat exhaustion – a heat-related condition that results when the body loses too much water and salt.

    Safety practices include:

    • drink plenty of water
    • rest in cool location
    • seek medical attention

    Back and muscle injuries – result from improper lifting.

    Safety practices include:

    • keep back straight and bend your knees
    • get assistance when lifting heavy objects
    • seek medical attention

    H. Listening skills

    Listening is the ability to focus closely on what another person is saying to summarize the true meaning of a message. An effective listener actively participates in the communication process.

    Guidelines for effective listening skills:

    • focus on the other person
    • show that you are paying attention
    • maintain eye contact
    • don’t interrupt
    • ask questions to clarify
    • occasionally rephrase or repeat what you have just heard
    • listen between the lines
    • don’t overreact
    • record key ideas and phases

    Practice these guidelines to learn the skill.

    I. Personal integrity

    Integrity is one of the guidelines for ethical behavior. As teachers, we should be role models for the type of ethical behavior we want our students to have. Always discourage unethical behavior.

    Guidelines for ethical behavior:

    • honesty – tell the truth
    • integrity – do not let peer pressure change your mind about what you know is right
    • trustworthiness – be reliable
    • loyalty – keep confidential information confidential
    • fairness – treat everyone equally
    • concern and respect for others – care about fellow employees
    • commitment to excellence – always do your best
    • accountability – be responsible for your actions

    J. Teamwork

    Foodservice workplaces focus on working as a team.

    Support the efforts by:

    • communicating effectively
    • resolving conflicts appropriately
    • developing negotiations skills

    Remember that every coworker is an individual with his or her own personality traits, strengths, and weaknesses.

    Good teamworks skills involve:

    • a positive attitude
    • respecting yourself
    • taking responsibility
    • learning from your mistakes
    • practicing empathy

    K. Conflict resolution

    Disputes and conflicts are an inevitable part of being on a team. There must be give and take, so learn to negotiate.

    Tips to help resolve conflicts:

    • focus on problem
    • concentrate on performing your work
    • discuss issue with manager

    L. Employer expectations

    Employers look for certain key qualities in their employees. One of those qualities is a strong work ethic. A work ethic is a personal commitment to doing your very best as part of a team.

    Key qualities include:

    • responsibility – ability to be aware of what a particular situation demands of you
    • flexibility – ability to adapt willingly to changing circumstances
    • honesty – being truthful and loyal in your words and actions
    • reliability – people can count on you to do what you say that you will do
    • teamwork – ability to effectively communicate, resolve conflicts, and develop negotiation skills
    • commitment – the dedication that you show to doing something

    Employees who have all of these qualities are often successful in their careers.

    M. Ethical standards

    Ethical behavior means doing what is right. It is your internal guidelines to distinguish right from wrong.

    The following questions can be asked to recognize the ethical course of action:

    • Does the choice comply with the law?
    • Is the choice fair to those involved?
    • Has the choice been communicated to me honestly?
    • Will I feel embarrassed or guilty about the choice?

    Behaving ethically also means taking responsibility. If students make a mistake, they should admit it. They will learn from their mistakes and make better choices.

    N. Organizational skills

    Organizational skills are the skills that enable you to keep your tools and information in order.

    Mise en place is a French term that means “to put in place.”

    Mise en place refers to the preparation and assembly of:

    • ingredients
    • pans
    • utensils
    • equipment
    • serving pieces

    The goal is to do as much of the work as possible in advance.

    Steps include:

    • assembling the tools
    • assembling the ingredients
    • washing, trimming, preparing, and measuring the ingredients
    • preparing the equipment

    O. Workplace policy

    Businesses must have effective policies and procedures established in order to be successful.

    Policies and procedures contribute to:

    • productivity
    • profitability
    • employee and customer satisfaction

    The policies are often found in employee handbooks. Procedures describe how specific tasks are to be performed.

    Policies explain:

    • the company’s pay and benefits
    • general workplace rules
    • safety and security
    • attendance
    • performance evaluations
    • how disciplinary issues are handled

    P. Fair labor standards

    Refer to Laws and Regulations in the Food Service Industry for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/laws-and-regulations-in-the-food-service-industry/

    The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) was passed in 1938 to protect workers from unfair treatment by employers.

    This act establishes:

    • minimum wage
    • overtime pay
    • child labor standards

    Minimum wage is the lowest hourly rate of pay that an employee can be paid legally.
    Foodservice workers who who earn tips can be paid less than minimum wage.

    Overtime pay – an employer must pay at least 1 ½ times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a work week.

    Child Labor Standards – the goal is to protect the health and educational opportunities of young people who choose to work.

    Read and display the FLSA Poster in your classroom to clarify details.

    Q. Confidentiality

    There are many times on the job when employees have the opportunity to hear or see something that should be kept private. Such company matters are confidential or private, and should not be shared with those or others who do not need to know.

    Personal matters about coworkers should also be kept private. Discussing private matters of others may cause conflict and problems.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module III Handouts

    Module IIIb Handouts

    • Appointment Schedule
    • Conversation Cubes
    • EEOC is the Law Poster supplement
    • Family and Medical Leave Act
    • FLSA Poster
    • I Have Rights Teen Poster
    • KWL for Ethics
    • KWL – Laws and Regulations in the Food Industry
    • Minimum Wage Poster
    • Overtime Pay Requirement
    • Rubric for Ethics Skit or Role Play
    • Rubric for Laws and Regulations Presentation
    • The Communication Process
    • USDA and FSIS Ethics and Conflicts of Interest
    • What Woud You Do Notes
    • What Would You Do Notes (Key)
    • What Would You Do Scenarios
    • Workplace Policies
    • Written Assignment Rubric
    • Youth Minimum Wage – Fair Labor Standards Act
    • Youth Rules! bookmark

    Teaching Strategies/Ideas

    • Encourage students to wear the full chef’s uniform when serving the public. Uniform must be neat, clean, and pressed.
    • If your students are already employed in the food industry, allow them to share “situations” with the rest of the class. Many things go on behind the scenes that you cannot teach. By sharing these stories, students may have a better understanding of workplace ethics.
    • Practice with your students – eye contact, handshakes, manners, and communication – so students are better prepared for the work environment.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Websites

    YouTube™:

    Food Handlers in the Work Place Module Three Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The chef jacket is designed to:

    • a. give the impression of professionalism
    • b. look stylish
    • c. protect the cook from burns
    • d. be comfortable

    2. A chef’s uniform should be worn with ________________.

    • a. pride
    • b. jewelry
    • c. dressy pants
    • d. ease

    3. Many accidents in the kitchen occur due to _________________.

    • a. inactivity
    • b. cramped facilities
    • c. co-workers
    • d. carelessness

    4. Integrity is one of the guidelines for ethical behavior. Integrity means:

    • a. tell the truth
    • b. do not let peer pressure change your mind about what you know is right
    • c. keep confidential information confidential
    • d. be responsible for your actions

    5. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes:

    • a. minimum wage
    • b. overtime pay
    • c. child labor standards
    • d. all of the above

    6. An employer must pay at least _____ times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a work week.

    • a. 1 ¼
    • b. 1 ½
    • c. 2
    • d. 2 ½

  • IV. Management Structure

    Finger Pressing Button on Calculator

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student applies academics with job-readiness skills.

    • (A) apply mathematical skills to business transactions
    • (B) develop a personal budget based on career choices
    • (C) interpret data from documents such as tables, charts, and graphs to estimate and find solutions to problems
    • (D) organize and compose workplace documents

    Module Content

    Management structure is the fourth unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Culinary Math Skills
    • B. Business charts and graphs
    • C. Budgeting
    • D. Career choices

    Module IV Handouts

    A. Culinary Math Skills

    The ability to calculate and perform other math skills is a basic part of every foodservice job.

    Calculating means working with numbers in:

    • adding
    • subtracting
    • multiplying
    • dividing

    Cooks, chefs, and bakers use math skills to:

    • adjust recipe yields
    • weigh ingredients
    • adjust cooking times and temperatures

    Servers use math skills to:

    • calculate customer’s bills
    • calculate sales tax
    • make change
    • keep track of tips

    Foodservice managers use math skills to:

    • order supplies
    • schedule deliveries
    • set up employee work schedules
    • complete payroll and tax forms
    • set portion sizes
    • estimate profits for the business

    All foodservice employees use basic math skills to:

    • keep track of work hours
    • pay rates

    Assign students to work out the math problems in Practicum in Culinary Arts Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems. Video clips of how to work out the problems are included in the Resources section of Practicum in Culinary Arts.

    B. Business charts and graphs

    Accounting software can help you keep track of financial information such as point-of-sale systems.

    Point-of-sale systems can track:

    • profits
    • expenses (marketing, advertising, and facility costs)
    • purchases, price lists, and inventory
    • reservations
    • recipes and food costs
    • work schedules, employee hours and wages

    These systems will also allow you to see charts and graphs of items listed above.

    C. Budgeting

    Managers need to know how money is being spent and how much profit is being made.
    A profit and loss statement (income statement) shows exactly how money flows into and out of a business for a specific time period such as one month, one quarter, or one year.

    Managers are asked to anticipate:

    • what things will cost
    • how many employees will be needed
    • how much profit a business will make

    Managers should then budget accordingly.

    D. Career choices

    Management Opportunities
    Management jobs in the foodservice industry are offered to people who have the right work experience, training, and education.

    Management careers include:

    • Executive Chef – manages all kitchen operations
    • Research Chef – works closely with food scientists to produce new food products
    • Culinary Scientist – uses culinary science to set new standards in food technology
    • Foodservice Director – manages the banquet operations of hotels, banquet facilities, hospitals, and universities
    • Catering Director – coordinates the food for special events and functions
    • Kitchen Manager – orders ingredients for menu dishes and makes sure they are prepared correctly
    • Dining Room Supervisor – coordinates and assigns duties to the serving staff such as hosts, servers, and bussers
    • Restaurant Manager – oversees the work of the entire restaurant

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IV Handouts

    • Practicum in Culinary Arts Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems

    Teaching Strategies /Lesson Ideas

    • Students in the foodservice industry must have at least basic math skills. Practice scaling, doubling and halving recipes, costing, menu prices, profits and losses, and more. Search the internet for more food related math problems.
    • Assign management research presentations so that students find out what it takes to be a manager.
    • Invite managers from local food venues to speak to the class about their roles and duties.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Management Structure Module Four Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Cooks, chefs, and bakers use math skills to:

    • a. adjust recipe yields
    • b. weigh ingredients
    • c. adjust cooking times and temperatures
    • d. all of the above

    2. Servers use math skills to:

    • a. calculate customer’s bills
    • b. calculate sales tax
    • c. make change
    • d. all of the above

    3. Problem #10 from the Practicum in Culinary Arts Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems
    Beth has a steady income from managing a restaurant and now she needs to make a personal monthly budget. She wants to spend no more than 55% of her income on her rent and car payment every month. If she makes $30,000 per year, up to how much should she spend per month on her rent and car payment?

    • a. $ 1,375.00
    • b. $ 2,500.00
    • c. $ 8,250.00
    • d. $16,500.00

    4. Point-of-sale systems CANNOT track:

    • a. expenses (marketing, advertising, and facility costs)
    • b. purchases, price lists, and inventory
    • c. projected sales
    • d. work schedules, employee hours and wages

    5. A(n) _______________________ shows exactly how money flows into and out of a business for a specific time period such one month, one quarter, or one year.

    • a. inventory statement
    • b. profit and loss statement
    • c. revenue statement
    • d. tax statement

    6. A culinary scientist:

    • a. works closely with food scientists to produce new food products
    • b. uses culinary science to set new standards in food technology
    • c. coordinates the food for special events and functions
    • d. manages all kitchen operations

  • V. Workplace Safety

    confident chef

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student uses concepts and skills related to safety in the workplace.

    • (A) identify and apply safe working practices
    • (B) solve problems related to unsafe work practices and attitudes
    • (C) explain Occupational Safety and Health Administration regulations in the workplace
    • (D) analyze health and wellness practices that influence job performance

    Module Content

    Workplace safety is the fifth unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Safety practices
    • B. Regulations
    • C. Enforcement

    Refer to Food Safety and Sanitation Guidelines – Practicum in Culinary Arts for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/food-safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-practicum-in-culinary-arts/

    Module V Handouts

    A. Safety practices

    Personal safety was covered in module III. This module will cover kitchen safety.

    Remind students that safety is very important and they should always be aware of what they are doing in the kitchen. The kitchen is not a place to play around in.

    View video for more information:

    • General Kitchen Safety
      The commercial kitchen is a busy environment that is full of many potential dangers that
      are both obvious and, in some cases, less obvious to the untrained person. When
      working in this environment, one must be aware of these potential hazards and how to
      avoid them.
      http://youtu.be/kz-KZGO65DA

    Fire Safety
    Fires in the workplace cause substantial property and equipment damage each year. They can cause injuries, even death.

    Fire safety practices:

    • be careful around gas appliances
    • store oily rags in closed metal containers
    • make sure all smoke alarms work properly
    • keep water away from electrical outlets
    • clean range and oven hoods and filters regularly to remove grease
    • keep all exits unlocked and accessible from the inside

    View video on how to use a fire extinguisher.

    Ask students if they have located the fire extinguisher where they work. By law, they should have access to one in case of fire and should know how to use it. Explain the PASS acronym.

    Display how to use the fire extinguisher while students fill out the handout Fire Extinguisher Use located in the Handouts/Graphic Organizers section.

    Sanitation practices
    Demonstrate the difference between cleaning and sanitizing. Have a student wipe off a counter top or table with a dry towel. Ask students if the area is clean enough for food prep? Why or why not?
    Demonstrate making a simple sanitizing solution.

    For Teachers only
    Sanitizing solution: Add 1 teaspoon regular household bleach to 1 quart (4 cups) of tap water in a large spray bottle. Sanitize counters, cutting boards, tables, utensils, etc. before and after use. Solution can be made in a large container and then poured carefully into smaller spray bottles.

    Note:

    • wear an apron and gloves when adding bleach to water as bleach can discolor clothes
    • spray bottles must be labeled
    • store out of children’s reach
    • replace sanitizing solution often

    Have a student wipe off a counter top or table with a towel that has been immersed in the sanitizing solution. Once again, ask students if the area is clean enough for food prep. Why or why not?

    For more information, read:

    Stress the importance of sanitation and it’s connection to preventing many foodborne illnesses. Discuss which areas of the lab are expected to be sanitized and who’s job it is to sanitize these areas. Stress sanitizing areas BEFORE and AFTER food prep, setting tables, etc.

    View video on how to clean and sanitize:

    • Sanitizing the Kitchen
      Consumers can protect themselves by preventing the spread of germs by both cleaning and
      sanitizing surfaces where food is prepared. This video explains how to make sanitizing solution
      with ingredients most people already have around the house.
      http://youtu.be/_9IhS2jv2OM

    Become familiar with CDC’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Youth @ Work curriculum.
    http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/talkingsafety/states/tx/default.html

    Included in the curriculum are:

    • Talking Safety Certificate
    • Talking Safety PowerPoint™
    • Talking Safety Teacher’s Guide
    • Talking Safety Overheads
    • Talking Safety Student Handouts
    • Your Safety IQ Quiz

    Review the materials and discuss workplace safety and how to prevent accidents.

    View safety video:

    B. Regulations

    The foodservice industry is governed by regulations. A regulation is a rule by which government agencies enforce minimum standards of quality. Federal, state, and local governments enforce these regulations.

    USDA Regulations
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) grades and inspects poultry and poultry products, eggs, and egg products

    USDA also controls:

    • food grading
    • processing plant inspections
    • the use of pesticides
    • preservatives
    • food additives

    FDA Regulations
    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It also enforces the the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1938. This law covers food and the packaging of foods other than fish, poultry, and meat.

    FDA also regulates:

    • food labels
    • menus
    • food code

    Food labels are the result of the 1990 Nutrition Labeling and Education Act.

    The nutrition label shows:

    • the percent of daily dietary value in the food
    • the number of calories per serving
    • the total calories
    • the amount of:
      • vitamins
      • mineral
      • fat
      • cholesterol
      • sodium
      • carbohydrates
      • protein

    The FDA has regulated health claims made by restaurants since 1997. A foodservice business must be able to provide nutritional information to any customer who asks for it.

    The Food Code gives guidelines for handling food safely. It is updated every two years and since it is not a law, states can choose to use it or write their own code using the Food Code as a guide. A copy of the 2009 Food Code and Supplement to the 2009 food code are included in the handout/graphic organizers section.

    Environmental Regulations
    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) decides how solid waste is managed in the United States.

    Solid waste includes:

    • packaging material
    • containers
    • recyclables

    The EPA recommends that businesses:

    • reduce solid waste by eliminating packaging where possible
    • clean and sanitize reusable food containers before reusing them
    • never reuse containers that hold chemicals and dispose them

    OSHA Regulations
    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sets standards and inspects workplaces to make sure that employers provide safe and healthful environments.

    OSHA makes sure that employers provide:

    • personal protective equipment
    • material safety data sheets identifying hazardous chemicals and their components
    • employees access to any records of exposure to toxic materials

    OSHA also oversees record keeping of job-related illness and injury. An accident report log shows the details of any accident that happens in a business. If an accident causes three or more employees to be hospitalized or one or more employees to die, that accident must be reported to a local OSHA office within eight hours. OSHA will then investigate to see if any standards were violated.

    State and Local Regulations
    The state writes many of the health regulations that affect foodservice operations. Local health departments then enforce state regulations. The county health health department enforces regulations in rural areas and small cities.

    C. Enforcement

    OSHA’s mission is to insure employee safety and health by:

    • setting and enforcing standards
    • providing training and education
    • working with employers to improve workplace safety and health

    OSHA provides posters and information supplements to employers and employees to make sure that workers know their rights.

    A copy of the “Job Safety and Health: It’s the Law” OSHA Poster to display is available in the handouts/graphic organizers section.

    Employees must:

    • be aware of their rights
    • follow the laws
    • provide correct information about themselves

    Managers are required to post:

    • minimum wage laws
    • annual/accident reports

    Managers are responsible for knowing the law and enforcing it as well as training employees to understand and follow the laws.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Note: There are many handouts too numerous and large to include in this section. Refer to the following lessons for handouts, graphic organizers, and more.

    Refer to Food Safety and Sanitation Guidelines – Practicum in Culinary Arts for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/food-safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-practicum-in-culinary-arts/

    Additional handouts not included in lesson:

    • OSHA Poster
    • Supplement to the 2009 Food Code

    Module V Handouts

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Ask students if they have had an accident in the kitchen or know someone who has. Allow them to tell their “story” about what happened.
    • Demonstrate the steps of how to use the fire extinguisher. Be careful not to press the handle, as some students may have allergies and the fumes and chemicals may be harmful to them.
    • Inquire with your school district’s safety officer for procedures to be able to demonstrate the fire extinguisher use outside.
    • Inquire with the fire education officer at your fire department about speaking to your class about fire safety and proper fire extinguisher use.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.
    • ServSafe® Manager. 6th. Chicago, IL: National Restaurant Association, 2012. Print.

    Websites

    YouTube™:

    • General Kitchen Safety
      The commercial kitchen is a busy environment that is full of many potential dangers that
      are both obvious and, in some cases, less obvious to the untrained person. When
      working in this environment, one must be aware of these potential hazards and how to
      avoid them.
      http://youtu.be/kz-KZGO65DA
    • Sanitizing the Kitchen
      Consumers can protect themselves by preventing the spread of germs by both cleaning and
      sanitizing surfaces where food is prepared. This video explains how to make sanitizing solution
      with ingredients most people already have around the house.
      http://youtu.be/_9IhS2jv2OM
    • How to use a Fire Extinguisher.
      Accidents happn. Be prepared.
      http://youtu.be/lUojO1HvC8c

    Workplace Safety Module Five Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are the steps to use a fire extinguisher correctly?

    • a. call 911 and evacuate
    • b. locate the fire extinguisher and spray the fire
    • c. locate the water hose and spray the fire
    • d. pull, aim, squeeze, and sweep

    2. _______________ reduces pathogens on a surface to safe levels.

    • a. Cleaning
    • b. Sanitizing
    • c. Bleach
    • d. Vinegar

    3. According to the Youth@Work video, what estimated percentage of teens work before they leave high school?

    • a. 70 %
    • b. 75 %
    • c. 80 %
    • d. 90 %

    4. Which federal agency regulates food labels?

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EPA
    • d. OSHA

    5. What is the Food Code?

    • a. The percent of daily dietary value in the food
    • b. The number of calories per serving
    • c. Guidelines for handling food safely
    • d. Food grading

    6. OSHA makes sure that employers provide:

    • a. personal protective equipment
    • b. material safety data sheets identifying hazardous chemicals and their components
    • c. employees access to any records of exposure to toxic materials
    • d. all of the above

    7. The foodservice industry is governed by regulations. Who enforces these regulations?

    • a. federal, state, and local governments
    • b. state governments only
    • c. local governments only
    • d. United States Department of Agriculture

  • VI. Production, Presentation, and Dining

    Table Set for Seder

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student understands the history of food service and the use of the professional kitchen.

    • (E) use large and small equipment in a commercial kitchen
    • (F) develop food production and presentation techniques
    • (G) demonstrate moist and dry cookery methods
    • (H) demonstrate food preparation skills used in commercial food service preparations such as breakfast cookery, salads and dressings, soups and sandwiches, stocks and sauces, appetizers, seafood, poultry cookery, meat cookery, pastas and grains, and fruits and vegetable
    • (I) demonstrate baking techniques such as yeast breads and rolls, quick breads, and desserts
    • (J) demonstrate proper receiving and storage techniques
    • (K) demonstrate proper cleaning of equipment and maintenance of the commercial kitchen
    • (L) demonstrate types of table setting, dining, and service skills

    Module Content

    Production, presentation, and dining is the sixth unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains ten TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Food service operations
    • B. Large equipment, small wares, and hand tools
    • C. Equipment cleaning
    • D. Commercial kitchen maintenance
    • E. Receiving and storage
    • F. Cooking methods: moist heat and dry heat
    • G. Work space and food preparation
    • H. Food production
    • I. Presentation techniques
    • J. Baking techniques

    Refer to Iron Chef Classroom Challenge for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/iron-chef-classroom-challenge/

    A. Food service operations

    Foodservice is a large industry that offers a wide range of operations.

    Types of food service operations include:

    • full-service restaurants – employ servers to take the customer’s order and bring the meal to their table.
      • fine-dining – offer elegantly prepared food, served by highly trained waitstaff. Linen napkins and tablecloths, fine china and crystal are used to create a refined atmosphere. Food served is of the highest quality.
      • casual restaurants – offer simply prepared foods in less formal surroundings.
    • quick-service or fast food restaurants – offer speed, convenience, and reasonable prices.

    B. Large equipment, small wares, and hand tools

    There are a variety of smallwares and preparation equipment that make a kitchen work more efficiently.
    Using the right tool for the job makes work easier and turns out a better end product.

    Small equipment includes:

    • measuring cups and pitchers
    • measuring spoons
    • Scales
      • portion scale
      • balance-beam scale
      • receiving scale
    • thermometers
      • bimetallic coil thermometer
      • candy thermometer
      • thermocouple thermometer
      • laser thermometer
    • grater
    • mandoline
    • straining equipment
      • china cap
      • colander
      • chinois
      • strainer
      • drum sieve
      • ricer
      • cheesecloth
      • food mill
    • food processors
    • blenders
      • bar blender
      • immersion blender
    • pots and pans
      • stockpot
      • rondeau
      • saucepot
      • double boiler
      • saucepan
      • sautepan
      • sautoir
      • cast-iron skillet
      • wok
      • roasting pan
      • braising pan
    • hotel pans
    • sheet pans
    • bowls
    • bain marie inserts

    The size, speed, capacity, and durability of commercial equipment is what sets it apart from home appliances.

    Types of commercial equipment include:

    • ranges
      • open-burner range
      • flattop range
      • griddle
    • ovens
      • conventional ovens
      • convection ovens
      • cook-hold ovens
      • combination ovens
      • microwave ovens
    • steamers
      • convection steamers
      • pressure steamers
    • kettles
      • steam-jacketed kettles
      • tilt braiser
    • grills and broilers
      • salamander
      • grill
    • fryers
      • deep fryers
      • pressure fryers
    • steam tables
    • warming cabinets
    • refrigerators
    • freezers

    C. Equipment cleaning

    Food can be contaminated easily if equipment and kitchen surfaces are not kept clean and sanitized.
    Cleaning removes food and other dirt from a surface.
    Sanitizing reduces pathogens on a surface to safe levels.

    Clean and sanitize large equipment after each use or after four hours of continual use.

    When cleaning kitchen equipment, follow these safety measures:

    • turn all switches to the off position
    • unplug the equipment
    • follow manufacturer’s instructions
    • follow food establishment’s directions

    Do not clean any equipment until you have been trained on its use and cleaning. Some equipment may have large parts that can be removed and washed in either a dish machine or three-compartment sink.

    D. Commercial kitchen maintenance

    All equipment must be regularly and properly maintained. This will ensure that the equipment stays in top operating condition. If equipment needs to be fixed, repairs must be made promptly to ensure the foodservice operation runs smoothly. The equipment must not be used until repairs are made to maintain kitchen safety.

    Each piece of equipment should have a preventive maintenance schedule. This is a list of tasks to be performed regularly to ensure that equipment stays in proper working order and outline how it should be done.

    Maintenance schedules should include:

    • a description of daily cleaning
    • weekly or monthly checks and adjustments
    • monthly, quarterly, or annual service

    E. Receiving and storage

    Receiving means checking that the food and supplies ordered were received in the right quantity and price.

    Steps to receiving shipments of food:

    • purchase order – a document noting the food or supplies at a predetermined price. Ensure that it is correct and complete.
    • invoice – a bill from the supplier for providing goods and services. Ensure that it is accurate and charged for only the items ordered.
    • inspection – inspect food items for quality. Reject any that do not meet standards.
    • receiving record – a numbered record of everything that was received at a business during a particuluar day. Should include:
      • quantity of each item received
      • item price
      • date delivered
      • supplier’s name
    • move to storage area

    Food must be stored correctly to prevent it from spoiling and causing foodborne illness.

    Food can be stored in:

    • refrigerators
    • freezers
    • shelving unites
    • storage bins
    • containers

    Follow the FIFO (first in, first out) rule. This means that all food should be used in the order in which it was received. Mark each item with the delivery date. Older items should be moved to the front of the storage area and newer items placed in the back.

    Make sure that all food stored in a freezer is covered in airtight wrapping to avoid freezer burn (light-colored spots on frozen food where surface drying has occurred) that can ruin foods. Frozen foods should also be labeled and dated.

    F. Cooking methods: moist heat and dry heat

    Three cooking methods are:

    • dry cooking
    • moist cooking
    • combination cooking

    The degree of change that occurs during the cooking process depends on the length of:

    • cooking time
    • temperature
    • cooking technique used

    Dry cooking methods use:

    • oil
    • fat
    • radiation of hot air
    • metal to transfer heat

    No moisture is used. Any moisture that comes from the food evaporates into the air.

    Examples of dry cooking methods are:

    • baking
    • roasting
    • sautéing
    • stir-frying
    • pan-frying
    • deep-frying
    • grilling
    • broiling

    Moist cooking methods use liquids instead of oil to create the heat energy needed to cook the food. When foods are cooked in water or other liquids, foods are completely submerged or covered in liquid.

    Examples of moist cooking methods are:

    • boiling
    • blanching
    • parboiling
    • simmering
    • poaching
    • steaming

    The combination cooking method uses both moist and dry cooking. This type of cooking is a two-step process. It is started by using one technique and finishing with the other.
    The objective is to build upon food flavors. It is especially useful for tough cuts of meat as it makes the meat more tender.

    Examples of combination cooking are:

    • braising
    • stewing

    G. Work space and food preparation

    The commercial kitchen is divided into work stations. A work station is a work area that contains the necessary tools and equipment to prepare certain types of foods.

    Each work station is arranged so that kitchen employees do not have to leave their stations to perform their work tasks.

    Work stations should have:

    • all necessary equipment
    • tools
    • work space
    • power sources
    • storage facilities

    To be able to begin cooking the food, be sure to have everything organized. Mise en place is a French term that means “to put in place.”

    Mise en place includes assembling all the necessary:

    • ingredients
    • equipment
    • tools
    • serving pieces

    Mise en place also involves:

    • preheating oven
    • cleaning and chopping vegetables
    • measuring spices
    • trimming meats

    This will help save time allowing the chef to cook without having to stop and assemble items.

    H. Food production

    Refer to Fruitful Discoveries for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/iron-chef-classroom-challenge/

    Refer to Mama Mia! The Secret is in the Sauce! The Five Mother Sauces for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/mama-mia-the-secrets-in-the-sauce-the-five-mother-sauces/

    Refer to Zest for Life! A Sensory Experience for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/zest-for-life-a-sensory-experience/

    Refer to Pastabilities: The Ins and Outs about Pasts for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/pastabilities-the-ins-and-outs-about-pasta/

    Food production is cooking and preparing food to be eaten.

    Breakfast cookery
    Most breakfast meat and egg dishes can be prepared quickly and do not require much advance preparation.

    The standard breakfast menu includes:

    • eggs
    • meat
    • potatoes
    • breads
    • pancakes
    • waffles
    • cereals
    • fruit
    • yogurt

    Salads and dressings
    A salad is a mixture of one or several ingredients with a dressing.

    • vegetables
    • leafy greens
    • meat
    • fish
    • cheese
    • pasta
    • fruit
    • nuts
    • grains

    Main types of salads include:

    • appetizer salads
    • accompaniment salads
    • main-course salads
    • separate-course salads
    • dessert salads

    A dressing is a sauce that is added to salads to give them flavor and to help hold the ingredients together.

    Soups and sandwiches
    Soups are a popular menu choice with a variety of flavors and nutrition that different soups provide.

    Types of soups include:

    • clear or thickened soups
    • thick soups
    • specialty soups

    Sandwiches are made of bread, a spread, and fillings. There many types of breads, spreads, and filling to choose from.

    Types of sandwiches include:

    • closed sandwiches
    • open-face sandwiches
    • triple-decker sandwiches

    Stocks and sauces
    A stock is a liquid that forms the foundation of sauces and soups.

    Main types of stocks include:

    • white
    • brown
    • fish
    • vegetable

    A sauce is a flavored, thickened liquid. It is usually formed by adding a thickening agent, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Appetizers
    An appetizer is a small portion of hot or cold food meant to stimulate the appetite that is served as the first course of a meal.

    Seafood
    Fish is made up of protein, fat, water, and vitamins and minerals.

    Seafood includes:

    • mollusks
    • oysters
    • clams
    • mussels
    • scallops
    • lobsters
    • shrimp
    • crab
    • crayfish
    • squid
    • frog legs
    • escargot
    • surimi
    • eel

    Poultry cookery
    A variety of moist and dry methods can be used to prepare poultry. This makes poultry one of the most versatile food products served.

    Cooking poultry includes:

    • roasting and baking
    • searing
    • broiling and grilling
    • pan-frying
    • deep-frying
    • pressure-frying

    Meat cookery
    Meat is one of the highest expenses for foodservice operations.

    Meats can be:

    • roasted
    • broiled and grilled
    • braised and stewed

    Pastas and grains
    Pasta is a starchy food product that is made from grains.

    Pasta can be:

    • boiled
    • baked

    A grain is a single, small, hard seed and is packed with nutrients.

    Grains include:

    • rice
    • oats
    • polenta
    • hominy

    Fruits and vegetables
    From appetizers to desserts, fruits add texture, nutrition, color, and flavor to any meal.

    Fruits are divided into eight categories;

    • citrus fruits
    • melons
    • berries
    • drupes
    • pomes
    • grapes
    • tropical fruits
    • exotic fruits

    Vegetables are versatile foods that add color, flavor, and texture to any meal.

    Vegetable classifications include:

    • the squash family
    • roots and tubers
    • seeds and pods
    • the cabbage family
    • stems, stalks, and shoots
    • the onion family
    • fruit-vegetables
    • leafy greens

    I. Presentation techniques

    Refer to The Visual Appeal of Plating Food for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-visual-appeal-of-plating-food/

    Refer to Setting the Tone: Table Setting, Dining, and Service for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/setting-the-tone-table-setting-dining-and-service/

    The visual appeal of a finished meal is important.

    A meal lacks visual appeal without a variety of:

    • colors, shapes, sizes
    • temperatures
    • flavors and textures
    • items
    • different arrangements

    Garnishes may also be added to meals to add visual interest and are placed on or around food to add color or flavor.

    A garnish is an edible food such as:

    • a sprig of parsley
    • an orange slice
    • a lettuce leaf
    • a tomato slice

    Plating is the arrangement of food and garnishes on a plate. Good plating is key to visual appeal. Attractively plated food leads to enhanced customer satisfaction.

    Keep in mind:

    • serving size
    • proportion
    • number of foods on a plate

    J. Baking techniques

    Baking is an exact science that requires precise measuring and accuracy. It also requires the use of special equipment and smallwares to produce professional products.

    Measuring and accuracy
    Bakers use formulas instead of recipes. They include exact amounts of each ingredient and are listed as percentages.
    It is important to add ingredients in the exact order specified in the formula.

    Baking ingredients are measured by:

    • weight – measures the mass or heaviness of something
    • volume – space an ingredient occupies

    Bakers refer to weighing as scaling and use a balance scale to weigh most ingredients.
    Measuring ingredients by weight gives consistent, reliable results.

    Professional bakers use:

    • a balance scale (or digital electronic scale) – to measure ingredients
    • math skills – to convert an entire formula to make the desired number of servings
    • percentages – a rate or proportion of 100

    Special equipment and smallwares
    Bakeshop equipment is exposed to wet, sticky ingredients and extreme changes in temperature.

    Bakeshop equipment should be:

    • durable
    • of good quality
    • well maintained

    Large baking equipment:

    • Mixers – used to mix, knead, or whip batters and doughs
      • attachments – spiral dough hook, flat beater or paddle, and a whip
    • Sheeters – rolls out large pieces of dough to a desired thickness
    • Proofing cabinets – allows dough to rise slowly in a humidity controlled, low-heat environment
    • Bakery oven – used to produce a large variety of baked products
    • Deck oven – has a series of well-insulated compartments stacked on top of another to bake a variety of items at different temperatures
    • Convection oven – has a fan that circulates the oven’s heated air that allows you to cook foods in about 30% less time and at temperatures 25° to 35° lower
    • Reel oven – bakes a quantity of similar items evenly as all items are exposed to the same temperature and humidity

    Small tools include:

    • Pans, molds, and rings – available in various sizes, shapes, and thicknesses

    A commercial bakeshop needs many different hand tools for:

    • cutting
    • molding
    • scooping
    • dividing
    • finishing

    Tools are used to:

    • form
    • cut
    • glaze
    • decorate

    Yeast breads and rolls
    Yeast breads and rolls are made from dough. Dough is basically flour or meal mixed with liquid that forms a paste. Yeast leavens or causes dough to rise as it fills with CO2 bubbles. This is called fermentation.

    Most common yeast bread doughs include:

    • hard lean dough
    • soft medium dough
    • sweet rich dough

    Quick breads
    Baked goods that can be served at breakfast, lunch, or with dinner.

    Examples include:

    • pancakes
    • biscuits
    • muffins
    • scones
    • waffles
    • loaf breads

    Desserts

    Desserts include:

    • cookies
    • cakes
    • pies
    • specialty deserts

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Note: There are many handouts too numerous and large to include in this section. Refer to the following lessons for handouts, graphic organizers, and more.

    Teaching Strategies/Ideas

    • Labs
      • Use the recipes that supplement the textbook you use in your classroom to practice each of the cooking methods.
      • Be careful using recipes from unreliable sources on the internet as many of the writers are not culinary professionals.
      • Use various lab plans that work best for you to assign duties to your students.
    • Ask students that are employed in the foodservice industry to share workplace tips that you can incorporate in your classroom lab.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.

    Production, Presentation, and Dining Module Six Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Which type of foodservice operation offers simply prepared foods in less formal surroundings?

    • a. casual restaurants
    • b. quick-service or fast food restaurants
    • c. full-service restaurants
    • d. fine-dining

    2. _______________ removes food and other dirt from a surface.

    • a. Sanitizing
    • b. Bleaching
    • c. Cleaning
    • d. Vinegar

    3. Following the FIFO rule means that:

    • a. all food should be used in the order in which it was received
    • b. all food should be used first
    • c. not all food should be used in the order in which it was received
    • d. all food should be dated

    4. Baking, roasting, sautéing, stir-frying, pan-frying, deep-frying, grilling, and broiling are all examples of what type of cooking?

    • a. moist
    • b. dry
    • c. combination
    • d. moist and dry

    5. Mise en place is a French term that means:

    • a. my place
    • b. clean my place
    • c. put in place
    • d. put back in place

    6. An example of a garnish is:

    • a. a sprig of parsley
    • b. an orange slice
    • c. a lettuce leaf
    • d. all of the above

    7. _______________ is the arrangement of food and garnishes on a plate.

    • a. Presentation
    • b. Garnishing
    • c. Proportion
    • d. Plating

  • VII. Portfolio Development

    Businesswoman Assisting Customers

    TEKS Addressed

    (11) The student documents technical knowledge and skills.

    • (A) complete a professional career portfolio to include:
      • (i) an updated resume
      • (ii) official documentation of attainment of technical skill competencies
      • (iii) licensures or certifications
      • (iv) recognitions, awards, and scholarships
      • (v) community service hours
      • (vi) participation in student and professional organizations
      • (vii) abstract of key points of the practicum
      • (viii) practicum supervisor evaluations
    • (B) present the professional career portfolio to interested stakeholders

    Module Content

    Portfolio development is the seventh unit of study in the Practicum in Culinary Arts course. This section contains eleven TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Portfolio preparation
    • B. Resume
    • C. Technical skill competencies
    • D. Licensures/certifications
    • E. Recognitions, awards, and scholarships
    • F. Community service
    • G. Student organizations
    • H. Professional organizations
    • I. Practicum
    • J. Supervisor evaluation
    • K. Portfolio presentation

    Refer to Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/maximize-your-job-search-with-a-career-portfolio/

    Module VII Handouts

    A. Portfolio preparation

    A job portfolio is a collection of papers and samples that showcase interests, talents, contributions, and studies. It displays your finest efforts and is a good self-marketing tool to show potential employers.

    Portfolios should be complete, neat, and well-organized.

    A portfolio should include copies of:

    • résumé
    • application
    • references
    • food handler’s certification
    • diploma or degree
    • certificates earned
    • photos of work

    It may be displayed in a three or four ring binder with sheet protectors to protect your photos, recipes, and so forth. Include dividers for easier access.

    Electronic portfolios are another great way to showcase a collection of work. Information can be stored on pen drives or uploaded to a website.

    Completion of a professional portfolio is a requirement for this practicum course. A professional portfolio is a ready reference of who the student is. Students will be able to review personal attributes and occupational skills that make them the right candidate for the job. The portfolio will also contain details about accomplishments, awards, leadership roles, and much more.

    Portfolios should be started in the first year of high school so that students may add to it each year. If students have not started one yet, allow them to begin one in your class and encourage them to bring in items of interest to be displayed

    Utilize the handout Ideas for Career Portfolio Checklist in the Handouts/Graphic Organizers section to view a list of items that may be included in a portfolio..

    B. Résumé

    A résumé is a written summary of experience, skills, and achievements that relate to the job you are applying for. Your résumé is a very important tool for job seeking.

    Résumé guidelines:

    • keep it short
    • stress foodservice skills, training, and work experience
    • include career objective
    • be sure to use correct grammar and spelling
    • print on good quality paper
    • no graphics or pictures
    • use food service keywords, such as:
      • restaurant
      • baking
      • cooking

    A résumé should include the following:

    • Personal information
      • name (first and last)
      • address
      • city, state, zip code
      • phone number
      • email address
    • Objective
    • Qualifications
    • Experience
    • Education
    • Special Skills, Training, or Certifications
    • References
    • Education

    There are several résumé templates in Microsoft® Word to choose from. Allow students to download a template and assist as they complete it.

    C. Technical skill competencies

    This section can show employers at a glance what technical knowledge and skills students have mastered. Examples include the portion of the Training Plan Agreement where knowledge and skills are documented or an abstract of key points of practicum experience.

    In the Resources section of Practicum in Culinary Arts, you will find a customized version of a Practicum in Culinary Arts Paid and Unpaid Training Plans. The TEKS have been inserted into the form making the completion of this form faster and easier.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/rgroup/practicum-in-culinary-arts/

    D. Licensures/certifications

    Certifications indicate that a student has demonstrated a high level of skill and has met specific performance requirements by participating in a rigorous process to become certified.

    Industry certifications are important components of programs of study and have gained importance in the business world as evidence of technical skill attainment. Many certifications are available, with more introduced each year.

    Earning a certification has many benefits. It gives students a sense of accomplishment, a highly valued professional credential, and helps make them more employable with higher starting salaries.

    Certification opportunities are one avenue through which career and technical education fulfills its goals under state law:

    • Each public school student shall master the basic skills and knowledge necessary for:
      • (1) managing the dual roles of family member and wage earner
      • (2) gaining entry-level employment in a high-skill, high-wage job or continuing the student’s education at the postsecondary level.

    Students working in the foodservice industry should obtain their Food Handler’s Certificate and/or Food Protection Manager’s Certification. There are several programs to choose from.

    • The ServSafe® Food Safety Training Program
      Provides current and comprehensive educational materials to the restaurant industry.
      http://www.servsafe.com

    Some of these certifications may require work experience as demonstration of competence in the field. Work experience counts as a part of the overall certification process.

    Students may research each of these certifications for requirements.

    E. Recognitions, awards, and scholarships

    Recognition is defined as the act of identifying someone or something because of previous knowledge, or to formally acknowledge someone.

    An award is a prize or other mark of recognition given in honor of an achievement.

    A scholarship is a grant or financial aid award to a student for the purpose of attending college.

    Examples include:

    • a neatly formatted list of recognitions related to the student’s career focus
    • copies of news articles
    • photos
    • letters of acknowledgment from employers, teachers, and so forth

    F. Community service

    One of the skills necessary to be successful in the foodservice industry is a commitment to the community.

    Students will play an important role in contributing to society once they become a wage earner.
    They will be able to volunteer their time, skills, and knowledge in many places around their community.

    Volunteer at any of the following:

    • city-wide festivals
    • food bank
    • fundraising events for non-profit organizations
    • homeless shelters
    • local soup kitchen
    • nursing home

    Serving the community will allow the student to view things in their community they may never before been exposed to. Remind students that what they give in volunteer work is more personally rewarding than what they receive.

    Provide documentation of participation in career and technical student organizations and professional associations, service learning experiences, and extracurricular activities.

    G. Student organizations

    Leadership skills can be gained through experience. Opportunities to build and strengthen leadership skills exist t through student organizations.

    Two of the organizations that promote culinary skills in family and consumer science are FCCLA and SkillsUSA.

    • Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA)
      • www.fcclainc.org
      • a national career and technical student organization for students in family and consumer sciences education
      • promotes personal growth and leadership development
      • offers opportunity for training in Culinary Arts and Hospitality and Tourism
      • stages competitive events for members enrolled in culinary arts and food service training programs
      • teams produce meals using commercial equipment and professional techniques
      • Leaders at Work is for students who work in the food production and services or hospitality and tourism. Students create projects to strengthen their communication, interpersonal, management, and entrepreneurship skills.
        http://www.fcclainc.org/content/leaders-at-work/
      • Students Taking Action with Recognition (STAR) events is a challenging competition in culinary arts, entrepreneurship, and interpersonal communications.

    • SkillsUSA
      • www.skillsusa.org
      • a national organization for high school and college students who are preparing for careers in technical, skilled, and service occupations
      • provides education experiences for students in leadership, teamwork, citizenship, and character development
      • also help to establish industry standards for job skills training in the lab and classroom
      • promotes community service
      • programs include local, state, and national competitions in which students demonstrate work-related and leadership skills
      • contests include:
        • Culinary Arts
        • Commercial Baking
        • Restaurant Service

    Make an effort to participate in either or both of these organizations to build leadership skills for your students.

    H. Professional organizations

    Successful chefs are constantly expanding their professional knowledge and skills. Seminars, classes, travel, dining, culinary competitions, and trade shows give chefs the chance to improve their talents.

    There are a many professional organizations providing continued learning.

    Better known professional organizations:

    • American Culinary Federation (ACF)
      • Mission includes certification, accrediting culinary schools, and culinary competitions
      • www.acfchefs.org
    • American Academy of Chefs (AAC)
    • American Personal and Private Chef Association
    • Bread Baker’s Guild of America
      • Devoted to advancing artisan bakers, their suppliers, and specialists in the science of baking and baking ingredients
      • www.bbga.org
    • International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP)
      • Provides education and networking for members engaged in culinary education, communication, and the preparation of food and drink
      • www.iacp.com
    • Les Dames d’Escoffier International
      • Women who have achieved professional success
      • Mission is to elevate the profession through mentoring members and helping worthy students succeed in culinary careers
      • www.ldei.org
    • Research Chefs Association (RCA)
      • Comprised of chefs and food scientists working in food manufacturing, chain restaurants, hotels, ingredient supply houses, consulting, and academia
      • www.culinology.com
    • Vatel Club
      • An organization of French speaking chefs and cooks
      • Assists in finding employment and maintains, promotes, and upholds the French Culinary tradition
      • www.vatel-club.lu/
    • World Association of Chefs’ Societies (WACS)
      • A nonpolitical professional organization dedicated to maintaining and improving the culinary standards of global cuisines
      • www.wacs2000.org
    • Women Chefs and Restauranteurs
      • Mission is to promote education and advancement of women in the restaurant industry and the betterment of the industry as a whole
      • www.womenchefs.org

    Students may research each of these organizations for requirements, dues, and benefits.

    I. Practicum

    The Practicum is the culminating course for CTE programs of study in each career cluster.
    Through practicum courses, students in grades 11-12 apply acquired knowledge and skills by participating in learning experiences that combine classroom instruction with industry work experiences.
    Practicum work experiences may be structured through laboratory-based, paid, or unpaid work
    experiences for students.

    Under revised Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) adopted by the State Board of Education
    for career and technical education (CTE) courses effective 2010-2011, each program of study with
    family and consumer sciences content culminates in a practicum course.

    The Practicum Coordination Handbook for Family and Consumer Sciences, while useful for many aspects of laboratory-based practicum courses, is specifically targeted to coordination of instructional arrangements for paid and unpaid work experiences.

    Refer to the Practicum Coordination Handbook for Family and Consumer Sciences for more details.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Practicum-Coordination-Handbook.pdf

    J. Supervisor evaluation

    An evaluation is a written report of how well you have performed your duties, and what you can do to improve.

    Your employer must provide you with feedback on your job performance. Students may be put on a probation period – a short period of time when you first start work where an employer can monitor their job performance.

    Include examples from student’s training sponsor, practicum supervisor, or other teachers of evaluations that highlight your skills and performance.

    K. Portfolio presentation

    Students should practice presenting their portfolio to you, the teacher-coordinator, training sponsor, or other interested stakeholders. In this way, they can solicit input to improve their portfolio; plus, they will gain additional, valuable experience in presenting the portfolio outside actual job interviews.

    View the following video for tips:

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VII Handouts

    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Career Portfolio Service Learning Log
    • Employment Portfolio Project
    • Ideas for a Career Portfolio Checklist
    • My Representation of My Portfolio
    • Practicum Coordination Handbook for Family and Consumer Sciences
    • Rubric for Employment E- Portfolio Project
    • Rubric for Employment Portfolio Project Binder
    • Steps to Maximize Your Job Search with a Career Portfolio
    • Steps to Maximize Your Job Search with a Carer Portfolio (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Ideas

    • Assist your students in preparing a portfolio that they may take with them to job interviews.
    • Download résumé templates in Microsoft® Word to allow students to practice writing their own.
    • The best thing you can do to teach your students food safety and sanitation is to help them pass the ServSafe® Manager’s Certification.
    • Check with your city or county health department to find out the requirements to be recognized as an instructor for your local community. You can then teach the course to members of your faculty, parents, and others at a nominal fundraising fee.
    • Encourage students to implement a service learning project. Students could organize a Kid Chef Camp and plan, market, and raise funds for charity. There is money in food.
    • Participate in FCCLA or SkillsUSA! The rewards are great for the students and they like the competitions.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Culinary essentials. (2010). Woodland Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw Hill.
    • Draz, J., & Koetke, C. (2010). The culinary professional. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • Foundations of restaurant management & culinary arts: Level one. (2011). Boston, MA: Prentice Hall.
    • Reynolds, J. S. (2010). Hospitality services: Food & lodging. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • ServSafe® Manager. 6th. Chicago, IL: National Restaurant Association, 2012. Print.

    Websites

    • American Culinary Federation (ACF)
      Mission includes certification, accrediting culinary schools, and culinary competitions
      www.acfchefs.org
    • American Academy of Chefs (AAC)
      Honor society of ACF – has the highest standards and demonstrates highest professionalism
      http://www.acfchefs.org/ACF/Partnerships/AAC/ACF/Partnerships/AAC/
    • American Personal and Private Chef Association
      Provides education and networking opportunities for personal chefs
      www.personalchef.com
    • Bread Baker’s Guild of America
      Devoted to advancing artisan bakers, their suppliers, and specialists in the science of baking and baking ingredients
      www.bbga.org
    • International Association of Culinary Professionals (IACP)
      Provides education and networking for members engaged in culinary education, communication, and the preparation of food and drink
      www.iacp.com
    • Les Dames d’Escoffier International
      Women who have achieved professional success
      Mission is to elevate the profession through mentoring members and helping worthy students succeed in culinary careers
      www.ldei.org
    • Research Chefs Association (RCA)
      Comprised of chefs and food scientists working in food manufacturing, chain restaurants, hotels, ingredient supply houses, consulting, and academia
      www.culinology.com
    • The ServSafe® Food Safety Training Program
      Provides current and comprehensive educational materials to the restaurant industry.
      http://www.servsafe.com
    • Vatel Club
      An organization of French speaking chefs and cooks
      Assists in finding employment and maintains, promotes, and upholds the French Culinary tradition
      www.vatel-club.lu/
    • World Association of Chefs’ Societies (WACS)
      A nonpolitical professional organization dedicated to maintaining and improving the culinary standards of global cuisines
      www.wacs2000.org
    • Women Chefs and Restauranteurs
      Mission is to promote education and advancement of women in the restaurant industry and the betterment of the industry as a whole
      www.womenchefs.org

    Portfolio Development Module Seven Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. How would you describe a portfolio to your students?

    • a. A large, thin, flat case for loose sheets of paper such as drawings or maps.
    • b. A group of investments held by an investor, investment company, or financial institution.
    • c. A collection of papers and samples that showcase interests, talents, contributions, and studies.
    • d. The office or post of a cabinet member or minister of state.

    2. A professional portfolio is a requirement for the Practicum in Culinary Arts course.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. What are the benefits of students earning a certification ?

    • a. It gives students a sense of accomplishment
    • b. It gives students a highly valued professional credential.
    • c. It helps make them more employable with higher starting salaries.
    • d. All of the above.

    4. Name the two recognized CTSO’s that have competition for Culinary Arts.

    • a. FCCLA and TAFE
    • b. FCCLA and SkillsUSA
    • c. SkillsUSA and ProStart
    • d. ProStart and HEAT

    5. Who provides continued learning for chefs?

    • a. professional organizations
    • b. businesses
    • c. media such as television, internet, and videos
    • d. family and friends

    6. The Practicum in Culinary Arts has paid or unpaid work experiences for students.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • Quiz

    Practicum in Culinary Arts Online Course

    Progress:

    1. The word chef is French for:

    2. Who defined the art of grand cuisine?

    3. What year did Julia Child donate her kitchen to the National Museum of American History?

    4. Who partners with the McDonald brothers to franchise their small hamburger restaurant?

    5. According to the video - Our Global Kitchen Introduction, from the American Museum of Natural History - our meals today are shaped by:

    6. Our food customs remain stable from generation to generation due to:

    7. The foodservice industry employs more people than any other private employment segment in the country.

    8. What are the benefits of an online employment search?

    9. Application forms often request information about education, references, and __________________.

    10. Name the federal form that determines whether employees are legally eligible to work in the United States.

    11. According to the 2013 Restaurant Industry Forecast, what is the fastest growing segment?

    12. A disadvantage to owning a food production business is:

    13. How many weeks notice should an employee give their employer when terminating employment?

    14. The chef jacket is designed to:

    15. A chef's uniform should be worn with ________________.

    16. Many accidents in the kitchen occur due to _________________.

    17. Integrity is one of the guidelines for ethical behavior. Integrity means:

    18. The Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) establishes:

    19. An employer must pay at least _____ times the employee’s regular rate of pay for all hours worked over 40 in a work week.

    20. Cooks, chefs, and bakers use math skills to:

    21. Servers use math skills to:

    22. Problem #10 from the Practicum in Culinary Arts Multiple Choice Math Assessment Problems * Beth has a steady income from managing a restaurant and now she needs to make a personal monthly budget. She wants to spend no more than 55% of her income on her rent and car payment every month. If she makes $30,000 per year, up to how much should she spend per month on her rent and car payment?

    23. Point-of-sale systems CANNOT track:

    24. A(n) _______________________ shows exactly how money flows into and out of a business for a specific time period such as one month, one quarter, or one year.

    25. A culinary scientist:

    26. What are the steps to use a fire extinguisher correctly?

    27. _______________ reduces pathogens on a surface to safe levels.

    28. According to the Youth@Work video, what estimated percentage of teens work before they leave high school?

    29. Which federal agency regulates food labels?

    30. What is the Food Code?

    31. OSHA makes sure that employers provide:

    32. The foodservice industry is governed by regulations. Who enforces these regulations?

    33. Which type of foodservice operation offers simply prepared foods in less formal surroundings?

    34. _______________ removes food and other dirt from a surface.

    35. Following the FIFO rule means that:

    36. Baking, roasting, sautéing, stir-frying, pan-frying, deep-frying, grilling, and broiling are all examples of what type of cooking?

    37. Mise en place is a French term that means:

    38. An example of a garnish is:

    39. _______________ is the arrangement of food and garnishes on a plate.

    40. How would you describe a portfolio to your students?

    41. A professional portfolio is a requirement for the Practicum in Culinary Arts course.

    42. What are the benefits of students earning a certification?

    43. Name the two recognized CTSO's that have competition for Culinary Arts.

    44. Who can provide continued learning for chefs?

    45. The Practicum in Culinary Arts has paid or unpaid work experiences for students.

    46. CTE stands for:

    47. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    48. TEKS stands for:

    49. Practicum in Culinary Arts is part of the ______________ Career Cluster.

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with:

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