Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Online Course

  • Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Online Course Introduction

    This laboratory course allows students to use principles of lifetime wellness and nutrition to help them make informed choices that promote wellness as well as pursue careers related to hospitality and tourism, education and training, human services, and health sciences.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness is one of 12 courses in the Human Services career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness can be added to any sequence of courses.

    Articulated Credit
    This course is also available for the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (1 credit) that gives high school students a chance to receive credit at participating community colleges across Texas for taking certain enhanced technical courses during high school.

    For more information, visit:

    Modifications for the Special Education and English Language Proficient Students

    Many links provided in this course can also be translated in Spanish or other languages for your ELPS students so they may understand the information. An auditory symbol may be visible and can be used for your Special Education students so that they can hear the information as they read it.

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and seven modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. 12 pre-assessment multiple choice statements can be found at the end of the Introduction. Each module ends with five multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. Passing is 70 or better and equivalent to six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    Refer to the Introductory Lesson: Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Nutrition is:

    • a. eating right all the time
    • b. the amount of calories in a meal
    • c. the study of nutrients and how the body uses them
    • d. making good choices about what you eat

    2. Wellness is:

    • a. a guarantee against illness
    • b. good health and positive well being
    • c. exhibiting positive attitudes
    • d. being able to study nutrition

    3. Poor nourishment caused by a lack of nutrients is:

    • a. malnutrition
    • b. anemia
    • c. cholera
    • d. peristalsis

    4. A calorie is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by how many degrees Celsius?

    • a. 4
    • b. 1
    • c. 6
    • d. 10

    5. Good recipes should:

    • a. be only for experienced cooks
    • b. be clear and have easy-to-follow directions
    • c. list ingredients in exact amounts from most to least
    • d. let you pick the cooking technique to use

    6. How many food groups are in the ChooseMyPlate icon?

    • a. 3
    • b. 4
    • c. 5
    • d. 6

    7. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated:

    • a. every year
    • b. every five years
    • c. every six months
    • d. every week

    8. The five main kitchen hazards are:

    • a. food, juice, meat, poultry, and fish
    • b. falls, cuts, electrical shocks, burns, and poison
    • c. showers, sinks, baths, counters, and floors
    • d. cabinets, drawers, counters, appliances, and microwaves

    9. The single most effective way to prevent the transfer of bacteria is to:

    • a. wrap food tightly and keep it refrigerated
    • b. avoid cross-contamination
    • c. keep your hands clean
    • d. tie back your hair if it is is too long

    10. It is a good idea to list frozen foods at the end of your shopping list because:

    • a. they will spend less time out of the freezer
    • b. they are harder to forget
    • c. they are less important
    • d. they will not have time to drip on other food packages

    11. The area containing each person’s tableware is called a:

    • a. place setting
    • b. cover
    • c. holloware
    • d. dinnerware

    12. How have food portion sizes changed in recent years?

    • a. Portion sizes have stayed the same.
    • b. Portion sizes have become smaller.
    • c. Portion sizes have grown dramatically.
    • d. Portion sizes have grown slightly.

  • I. Effective Work Habits

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student demonstrates effective work habits.

    • (A) participate as an effective team member demonstrating cooperation and responsibility
    • (B) apply effective practices for managing time and energy to complete tasks on time
    • (C) practice problem solving using leadership and teamwork skills

    Module Content

    Effective Work Habits is the first unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Teamwork
    • B. Time Management
    • C. Problem Solving

    Refer to Successful Lab Management Guidelines for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/successful-lab-management-guidelines/

    Module One Handouts

    Teamwork
    Teamwork means combining individual efforts to reach a shared goal.
    Working together as a team in the kitchen will make the job smoother, faster, and fun. Students may want to remain in teams with their friends in the class; but in the workforce, we don’t get to choose who we work with. Students need to learn to get along with other peers not in their circle of friends. This will allow lower level students to model and work with higher functioning students and vice versa.

    Teamwork should include the following skills:

    • Organization
      Using a work or a lab plan will facilitate team members to be organized as they work on their assigned tasks. Encourage students to follow the instructions to complete their duties.
      .
    • Cooperation
      Team members should work together to complete their lab. Assisting others who fall behind promotes cooperation. Encourage students to help each other.
    • Communication
      Talking to each other in a team allows for a learning experience and discussion. Encourage students to communicate with their team members to complete assigned tasks.
    • Responsibility
      Learning the assigned job and doing the fair share of work carefully, efficiently, and in a timely manner will produce successful results.

    Students should complete their duties efficiently and carefully following all safety rules. Encourage students to assist their team members after they have completed their tasks.

    Once you establish your groups, use the graphic organizer Lab Duty Assignments so that students may write in your own description for each title. Lab Duty Assignments 4 blank and Lab Duty Assignments 5 blank are included to adapt them to your particular group arrangements.

    Time Management
    Timing is crucial in lab settings, so planning is important so students can complete the lab, eat, and clean before leaving to their next class.

    Make sure to choose recipes that can be completed in the required amount of time and read the recipe with the students before the lab so they can become aware of:

    • ingredients needed
    • equipment to use
    • oven temperature
    • cooking or baking time
    • food preparation techniques

    Various lab plan worksheets include a timetable with each task broken down in segments. Look for one that works best for your students in the amount of class time available. A lab plan sheet or a work plan is a list of all tasks needed in order to prepare a meal. It should list a timetable and tasks for each member.

    Problem Solving
    Problems are going to occur in any situation. Students should learn what they can or will do if a problem occurs.

    Create different scenarios as to what the team will do if:

    • a team member is absent from lab
    • two team members are absent from lab
    • a team member adds too much of one ingredient
    • a team member forgets to add an ingredient to the recipe or grocery list
    • a team member forgets to bring an item (ingredient or dish)
    • a team member does not feel well the day of lab
    • a team member burns, overcooks, or undercooks the recipe

    Brainstorm with your students to solve these problems.

    Leadership is the ability to guide or direct people. Students can practice leadership skills as the chef of a team in the foods lab.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module One Handouts

    • Lab Duty Assignments
    • Lab Duty Assignments 4 blank
    • Lab Duty Assignments 5 blank

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Many students in your class have experience in the kitchen and many have never cooked or have been allowed to cook at home. Choose recipes that are easy to follow, have few ingredients, and will teach students proper techniques to produce a flavorful product.
    • Begin with simple, easy recipes to start the labs so that students will understand your expectations. Increase in difficulty for each lab.
    • Be sure to demonstrate the recipe prior to the lab so the students are prepared and know how their product should look and taste.
    • In a job setting, employees do not choose who they work with. Allow students to choose their own lab partners by drawing numbers for their groups. If they draw a number one, the student is in group one, and so forth. Number according to the number of groups that your kitchen lab can accommodate. This way they “select” their own group.
    • It is important to plan simple, nutritious, and healthy labs that follow the Choose My Plate guidelines. Refer to the Resources section for this course for recipes from the USDA’s SNAP-ED Connection. These recipes include a nutritional analysis and a cost analysis and are easy to make with limited ingredients. Cookbooks include: Whole Grain Recipes, Healthy Recipes, Fruits and Vegetables Recipes, Fast and Easy Recipes, and Beverage Recipes.
      http://cte.sfasu.edu/resources/resources-for-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe.

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Teamwork should include the following skills:

    • a. Dedication, sense of humor, and risk taking
    • b. Knowledge, intelligence, skill, and loyalty
    • c. Leadership, planning, working alone, and skills
    • d. Organization, cooperation, communication, and responsibility

    2. A good, well-written recipe

    • a. will detail the oven temperature and cooking time.
    • b. will have ingredients and equipment listed.
    • c. will include step by step instructions.
    • d. All of the above.

    3. Leadership is

    • a. getting people to do what you say.
    • b. doing someone else’s work in addition to your own.
    • c. talking to people while you work.
    • d. the ability to guide or direct people.

    4. A team member is absent the day of a foods lab. What should you do?

    • a. Ask the rest of the team members if they can step up and do the absent team member’s job.
    • b. Assign book work.
    • c. The team does nothing since their team is missing a person.
    • d. The whole team takes a zero grade and fails the lab.

    5. Team members should help each other by

    • a. asking for help.
    • b. being willing to help.
    • c. showing respect.
    • d. all of the above.

  • II. General Nutrition Principles

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student understands the role of nutrients in the body.

    • (A) classify nutrients, their functions, and food sources and compare the nutritive value of various foods
    • (B) assess the effects of nutritional intake on health, appearance, effective job performance, and personal life
    • (C) analyze and apply various dietary guidelines throughout the life cycle, including pregnancy, infancy, childhood, and late adulthood
    • (D) compare personal food intake to recommended dietary guidelines

    Module Content

    General Nutrition Principles is the second unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Nutrients
    • B. Effects of Nutrition
    • C. Dietary Guidelines

    Nutrients
    Depending on your class schedule, have your students study each food group individually, the nutrients that the food group best reflects, and suggested lab ideas each week.

    This section will be divided into three areas:
    I. Food Groups
    II. Nutrients
    III. Suggested labs


    To introduce the ChooseMyPlate Food Groups, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and the nutrients, refer to lesson Nutrition Principles for a Lifetime of Wellness.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/nutrition-principles-for-a-lifetime-of-wellness/

    I. Food Groups

    • ChooseMyPlate.gov
      In June, 2011, the United States Department of Agriculture introduced the new food guide – MyPlate, based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
      The different plate shape is to help grab consumers’ attention with a new visual cue that is a familiar mealtime symbol.
      http://www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/

    II. Nutrients
    Nutrients in food keep our bodies healthy. They include:

    • Water – needed to sustain life; the body is made up of 55 to 75 percent water.
    • Vitamins – important to health; work with enzymes to keep cells healthy and active.
      • Water-soluble vitamins – dissolve in water and pass easily into the bloodstream during digestion.
      • Fat-soluble vitamins – are absorbed and transported by fat.
    • Carbohydrates – the body’s main source of energy and are found mostly in plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, grain products, dry beans, nuts, and seeds.
    • Proteins – help your body grow and repair itself and is found in animal products including meat, poultry, fish, eggs, and dairy products as well as plant foods such as dry beans and peas, nuts, vegetables, and grain products.
    • Minerals – are part of the body in bones in teeth.
    • Oils – are greasy substances that are either solid or liquid and will not dissolve in water.

    Introduce this section using the graphic organizer The Nutrients in Food.
    Students may take notes from each of these nutrients to keep in the notebook/cookbook.

    Unhealthy food choices or a lack of food can lead to malnutrition which is poor nourishment resulting from a lack of nutrients. This can cause serious health problems.

    III. Labs
    Choose healthy, nutritious recipes that fit your time schedule and school budget. Some available choices are:


    As you study each section of the plate, connect your computer to a multimedia projector to view each page of the site. Discuss some of the fruits/vegetables/grains/protein foods/dairy foods they have eaten and which one they would like to try. Try an image search of some of the fruits they are not familiar with.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Fruits and Water-Soluble Vitamins.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-fruits-and-water-soluble-vitamins/

    Study the vitamins/minerals that most correspond to the food groups. Discuss with students the food sources, reasons we need these vitamins/minerals and what can happen if we do not eat enough of them as well as if we eat too much of them. Allow students to take notes during the discussion. You may use your textbook for this information or a reliable internet source.

    • II. Water-Soluble Vitamins
      • Vitamin C (ascorbic acid)
      • Thiamin (vitaminB1)
      • Riboflavin (vitamin B2)
      • Niacin (vitamin B3)
      • Vitamin B6 (pyridoxine)
      • Folate (folacin, folic acid, vitamin B9)
      • Vitamin B12 (cobalamin)
      • Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5)
      • Biotin (vitamin H)
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of two healthy, nutritious recipes containing fruit that may be baked, broiled, mashed, or pureed.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Vegetables and Fat-Soluble Vitamins.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-vegetables-and-fat-soluble-vitamins/

    • II. Fat-Soluble Vitamins
      • Vitamin A
      • Vitamin E
      • Vitamin D
      • Vitamin K
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of two healthy, nutritious recipes containing vegetables that may be baked, broiled, mashed, or pureed.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Grains and Carbohydrates.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-grains-and-carbohydrates/

    • What’s in the Grains Group?
    • How Much is Needed?
    • What Counts as an Ounce?
    • Health Benefits and Nutrients
    • Tips to Help You Eat Whole Grains
    • II. Carbohydrates
      • Sugars: Simple Carbohydrates
      • Starches: Complex Carbohydrates
      • Dietary Fiber
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of two healthy, nutritious recipes containing whole grains that may be baked or cooked.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Protein Foods and Trace Minerals.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-protein-foods-and-trace-minerals/

    • II. Trace Minerals
      • Iron
      • Zinc
      • Copper
      • Iodine
      • Selenium
      • Fluoride
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of a healthy, nutritious meal containing beef, chicken, tuna, eggs or a meatless (beans) meal.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Dairy, Major Minerals, and Electrolytes.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-dairy-major-minerals-and-electrolytes/

    Visit the Got Milk website to view how imitation milk is made. Students may learn from this information as well.
    http://www.gotmilk.com/

    • II. Major Minerals
      • Calcium
      • Phosphorus
      • Magnesium
      • Sodium (Electrolyte)
      • Chloride (Electrolyte)
      • Potassium (Electrolyte)
    • Electrolytes
      • Sodium
      • Chloride
      • Postasium
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of two healthy, nutritious recipes containing milk, cheese, or yogurt that may be baked, broiled, mashed, or pureed.

    For more information, refer to lesson ChooseMyPlate – Oils and Fats.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-oils-and-fats/

    • II. Oils
      • Saturated Fat
      • Polyunsaturated Fat
      • Monounsaturated Fat
      • Trans Fat
      • Cholesterol
    • III. Lab
      • Choice of recipes may include different cookies so students may visualize the fat content and emphasize portion control.

    Effects of Nutrition
    Your health is influenced by your heredity, lifestyle, and food choices.

    Good nutrition:

    • Appearance – helps give you shiny hair, bright eyes, healthy nails and teeth, and smooth, clear skin
    • Fitness – helps you stay energetic and alert throughout the day
    • Weight – helps you reach and maintain a healthy weight
    • Protection from illness – helps your body defend against disease
    • Healing – helps the body build new cells, repair breaks and sprains, and heal after illness or surgery
    • Emotional strength – helps your body and mind deal with stress
    • Future health – helps you stay healthy as you grow older

    Use the graphic organizer Effects of Good Nutrition and Effects of Good Nutrition (Key) included in Nutrition Principles for a Lifetime of Wellness lesson, with your students so they may understand the importance of good nutrition.

    Dietary Guidelines

    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 are the best science-based advice on how to eat for health.
    The guidelines encourage all Americans to eat a healthy diet and be physically active.
    Because more than one-third of children and more than two-thirds of adults in the United States are overweight or obese, the 7th edition of Dietary Guidelines for Americans places stronger emphasis on reducing calorie consumption and increasing physical activity.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Note: There are many handouts too numerous and large and to include in this section. Refer to the following lessons for handouts, graphic organizers, and more.

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Attach your computer to a multimedia projector and view the ChooseMyPlate.gov website together so your students can become familiar with the plate and learn more about nutrition and all the nutrients food has to offer. Be sure to visit the food gallery for each of the food groups.
    • Make copies of the Ten Tips Nutrition Education Series for students to keep in their notebooks/cookbooks.
    • Create a slide presentation for each of the six nutrients that includes the food sources, why we need the nutrients, and what can happen if we do not eat these food nutrients.
    • Assign a cookbook to include all the recipes, nutrient notes, and handouts for students to use at home or take to college. Have the student look for additional recipes for each of the food groups. They can personalize it by adding stickers, pictures, clip art, and family recipes.
    • Design a word search puzzle with as many fruits and vegetables as possible. Allow students to identify the fruits and vegetables and ask them to identify those they have eaten or tried. Using a search engine, do an image search for the fruits/vegetables your students are not familiar with. Free puzzlemaker at http://puzzlemaker.discoveryeducation.com/WordSearchSetupForm.asp
    • When studying the dairy group, allow students to make a milk mustache and take pictures like the ones on the milk mustache website. Use vanilla or chocolate ice cream and milk to make a thick milkshake so they can “paint” their mustache.
      http://www.milkmustache.com/
    • Print copies of ChooseMyPlate’s 10 Tips Nutrition Education Series to distribute to students as they study each section. They may keep these important tips in a cookbook to refer to them.
      http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-eating-tips/ten-tips.html
    • Allow students to play ChooseMyPlate’s interactive Blast Off Game. This game is for children ages 6 to 11 but it is a fun way to fuel their rocket with food and physical activity. They can then go home and introduce the game to their younger brothers and sisters or children they may babysit. If students successfully make it to Planet Power, they will receive a certificate that they can include in their cookbook.
      http://www.choosemyplate.gov/children-over-five.html

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. How many vegetables are needed daily for girls between the ages of 14 and 18 years old?

    • a. 2 1/2 cups
    • b. 3 cups
    • c. 1 1/2 cups
    • d. 1 cup

    2. According to the 10 tips Nutrition Education Series on Salt and Sodium, Americans should reduce their sodium intake to:

    • a. 3.500 milligrams
    • b. 3,000 milligrams
    • c. 2,500 milligrams
    • d. 2,300 milligrams

    3. What is poor nourishment caused by a lack of nutrients called?

    • a. Malnutrition
    • b. Anemia
    • c. Cholera
    • d. Peristalsis

    4. The two types of vitamins are

    • a. organic and inorganic.
    • b. fat-soluble and water-soluble.
    • c. calcium and iron.
    • d. antioxidant and free radical.

    5. Rickets and Osteomalacia are caused by a lack of what vitamin?

    • a. A
    • b. B
    • c. C
    • d. D

  • III. Food Safety and Sanitation

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student understands safety and sanitation.

    • (A) demonstrate safe and sanitary practices in the use, care, and storage of food and equipment
    • (B) explain types and prevention of food-borne illnesses
    • (C) practice appropriate dress and personal hygiene in food preparation

    Module Content

    Food Safety and Sanitation is the third unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Food and Equipment
    • B. Food-borne Illnesses
    • C. Hygiene

    Module Three Handouts

    Food and Equipment
    Before students are allowed in the kitchen labs, safety and sanitation must be taught. Spend as much time as you need in this section to make sure that the students will be safe and everyone around them will be safe. Set a higher standard with a passing grade of 80 or better before they are allowed in the lab. Students will meet the expectations.

    Refer to lesson Food Safety and Sanitation Guidelines for rules and guidelines to follow before students are allowed in the food lab/kitchen areas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/food-safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    Food-borne Illnesses
    Food-borne illness is caused by eating food that contains a contaminant. Symptoms include fever, headache, and digestive problems. This can be preventable. Harmful bacteria are the most common cause of food poisoning, but other causes include viruses, parasites, toxins and contaminants.

    Click on the links provided to learn more about food-borne illnesses.

    • Least Wanted Foodborne Pathogens
      The U.S. Public Health Service has identified the following microorganisms as being the biggest culprits of foodborne illness, either because of the severity of the sickness or the number of cases of illness they cause. Beware of these pathogens: Fight BAC! ®
      http://fightbac.org/about-foodborne-illness/least-wanted-pathogens

    Hygiene
    Bacteria on your body can contaminate work surfaces, utensils, and food. By practicing personal hygiene; thoroughly washing your body, face, and hands, you help to avoid transferring harmful bacteria when handling food.
    Your hands come in frequent contact with food, so keeping them clean is the single most effective way to prevent the transfer of bacteria.

    Be sure your students observe the following personal hygiene before they enter the lab area:

    • wear clean clothes
    • wear a clean apron
    • roll up long sleeves
    • remove all jewelry
    • tie long hair back
    • wash hands

    Make a habit of the 20 second scrub. Using soap and warm water, scrub your hands for 20 seconds. Use a brush to clean underneath your fingernails. Keep your nails trimmed.

    Steps to Hand Washing

    1. Wet hands and arms
    2. Apply soap
    3. Scrub hands and arms vigorously
    4. Rinse hands and arms thoroughly
    5. Dry hands and arms

    Visit the American Cleaning Institute website to download free posters, brochures, bookmarks, and fact sheets.
    http://www.cleaninginstitute.org/clean_living/hands_publications.aspx

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module Three Handouts

    • Clean FightBAC Fact Sheet
    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • Food Poisoning Research
    • Food Poisoning Spider Web
    • Hand Washing Steps
    • Hand Washing Steps (Key)
    • Home Kitchen Safety
    • Kitchen Food Safety Test
    • Kitchen Food Safety Test (Key)
    • Kitchen Hazards
    • Kitchen Hazards (Key)
    • Kitchen Safety Guidelines
    • Rubric for Oral Presentation – Food Poisoning
    • Safety and Sanitation Award
    • Sanitation and Food Safety Rules

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Invite a member of the local fire department to speak about fire safety and what do in case of a kitchen fire.
    • Create a slide presentation with your rules and procedures for the labs.
    • Allow students to practice washing their hands using the correct procedures.
    • If available, use a Glo-germ kit to emphasize how easily germs spread.
    • Remind students that you are not responsible for jewelry left in aprons or by the sink. They should keep it in a safe place after removing it.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for Today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    YouTube

    • Food Safety Music – Microbes Medley – Animation
      A two-song medley: “Microbes, They Might Kill You” and “We Are the Microbes” is a parody of Queen’s “We Will Rock You” and “We Are the Champions,” as performed by Carl Winter.
      http://youtu.be/1EkehFkhWf4

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Turn pan handles to the back or middle of the range to

    • a. avoid burns or spills.
    • b. make it easier to grab.
    • c. make it easier to clean the range.
    • d. allow easier access.

    2. The first step in washing dishes is to

    • a. fill sink with hot soapy water.
    • b. wash flatware first.
    • c. scrape all garbage from dishes and place in proper containers.
    • d. stack dishes properly.

    3. The third step in the five step hand washing process is

    • a. apply soap.
    • b. rinse hands thoroughly under running water.
    • c. dry hands and arms with a single-use paper towel or a warm-air hand dryer.
    • d. vigorously scrub hands and arms for at least 10 to 15 seconds.

    4. The name for a substance, such as a chemical or organism, that makes food unsafe to eat is a

    • a. foodborne illness.
    • b. toxin.
    • c. spore.
    • d. contaminant.

    5. What is the most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States, and the most common cause of foodborne deaths?

    • a. E.coli o157:H7
    • b. Salmonella
    • c. Shigella
    • d. Campylobacter

  • IV. Food Management Principles

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student demonstrates knowledge of food management principles.

    • (A) read and comprehend standard recipes
    • (B) correctly use standard measuring techniques and equipment
    • (C) demonstrate correct food preparation techniques, including nutrient retention
    • (D) use food buying strategies such as calculating food costs, planning food budgets, and creating grocery lists
    • (E) demonstrate food preparation techniques to reduce overall fat and calories
    • (F) practice etiquette, food presentation, and table service appropriate for specific situations
    • (G) apply food storage principles

    Module Content

    Food Management Principles is the fourth unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Recipes and Measurements
    • B. Preparation Techniques
    • C. Purchasing and Storage Strategies
    • D. Table Service, Presentation, and Etiquette

    Refer to Successful Lab Management Guidelines for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/successful-lab-management-guidelines/

    Refer to Table Settings, Etiquette and Presentation for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/table-settings-etiquette-and-presentation/

    Module IV Handouts

    Recipes and Measurements

    A recipe is a set of directions for making a food or beverage. A well-written recipe should have the following:

    • Recipe name
    • List of ingredients
    • Yield
    • Cooking method, temperature, and time
    • Equipment needed
    • Step-by-step directions
    • Nutrition analysis

    As you know, anyone can write a recipe and post it on the internet and write cookbooks. But are they easy to follow? Use the graphic organizer Recipe Breakdown with your students and have them locate any recipe from cookbooks, magazines, or the internet to complete the information.

    Recipes usually turn out best when you use each ingredient in exactly the right amount. Allow students to work with measuring dry and wet ingredients using the correct measuring cups and small amount ingredients using measuring spoons. You may use the handouts Measurement Standards, Measurement Standards (Key), Standards of Measurement and Substitutions for Healthier Cooking and Baking so that students become familiar with increasing and decreasing ingredient amounts and making healthier meals.

    USDA’s SNAP Connection has a collection of easy, healthy recipes that include the nutritional analysis and cost analysis. We have compiled these suggested recipes in cookbooks for you to choose from. Be sure and check them out.

    USDA SNAP-Ed Cookbooks:

    • Beverage
    • Fast and Easy
    • Fruits and Vegetables
    • Healthy
    • More Great Recipes!
    • Whole Grain

    http://cte.sfasu.edu/resources/resources-for-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    Preparation Techniques

    Tools and Equipment
    A well-equipped kitchen has a variety of tools and cooking and serving equipment. You may have most of these or more. Allow your students to study what you have available.

    Tools can be divided into categories and can include:

    • I. Measuring Tools
      • dry measuring cups
      • liquid measuring cups
      • measuring spoons
      • measuring scale

    • II. Knives and cutting tools
      • boning knife
      • bread knife
      • chef’s knife
      • cutting board
      • kitchen shears
      • paring knife
      • slicing knife
      • utility knife
      • vegetable peeler
    • III. Mixing, cooking, and baking tools
      • baster
      • ladle
      • pastry brush
      • pot holder/oven mitt
      • rolling pin
      • rubber scraper
      • sifter
      • tongs
      • turner
      • wire cooling rack
      • wire whisk
    • V. Clean up supplies
      • dishcloths
      • dish drainer
      • dishtowels
      • scouring pads

    Cooking Terms
    As you are aware, there are many cooking terms for students to learn. Begin with the basic terms so students become familiar with the techniques required. Handout Cooking Terms may be used and more terms added if needed. Notice that the word fry is not on the cooking terms list as this is not a nutritious preparation method. It can be used in Culinary Arts.

    Planning and preparation are a key to successful labs. Make sure to plan ahead by using a

    • grocery lists
    • lab plan sheets
    • well-written recipes

    Don’t forget to evaluate your lab. Find out from your students what worked and what didn’t work to improve the success of your labs.

    Purchasing and Storage Strategies

    Shopping for food is a skill just like preparing a meal. There are many choices such as:

    • supermarkets
    • warehouse stores
    • warehouse clubs
    • health food supermarkets
    • specialty stores
    • food cooperatives
    • convenience stores
    • farmer’s markets
    • online food retailers

    Get to know your store and the layout and plan your trip to save time. Get the most for your food budget. There are many ways to save money on the foods that you eat. The three main steps are planning before you shop, purchasing the items at the best price, and preparing meals that stretch your food dollars. For more information, visit 10 tips Nutrition Education Series – eating better on a budget.
    10 Tips to help you stretch your food dollars
    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/foodgroups/downloads/TenTips/DGTipsheet16EatingBetterOnABudget.pdf

    Food-Storage Guidelines

    Proper storage prevents spoilage and preserves food’s nutrients, flavor, texture, and appearance. Follow these guidelines to protect quality in the stored food:

    • Follow package directions for storing food.
    • Follow the FIFO rule – First in, First out. Store newly purchased food behind older food.
    • Check sell by and use by dates. If no date appears, write the purchase date on them.
    • Clean storage areas regularly.
    • Buy only what you need.

    Table Service, Presentation, and Etiquette

    Refer to Table Settings, Etiquette and Presentation for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/table-settings-etiquette-and-presentation/

    Basic Table Service
    A table should be set before people sit down to eat. Even a simple table setting can be special.
    Use the graphic organizer Basic Table Setting to teach the essential pieces of a cover.

    There are four types of table service:

    • Family Service – serving meals in which food is placed in serving dishes and passed around the table.
    • Plate Service – serving meals in which food is portioned out on individual plates in the kitchen and brought to the table.
    • Modified English Service – a more formal way of serving a meal for a small group as foods for the main course are brought to the table in serving dishes and are placed in front of the host, along with a stack of dinner plates. The host then serves the main course and vegetables on each dinner plate and passes the plate to the right to the person at the end of the table.
    • Buffet – a method of serving food in which people help themselves to food set out on a table.

    Use the graphic organizer Meal Service to discuss the differences with your students.

    Etiquette
    The courtesy you show to others by using good manners when eating. It is an important part of serving and enjoying food.
    Knowing table etiquette can also be an asset in the working world as some job interviews and business meetings take place during a meal. View the How To videos as they include steps and tips and needed supplies.

    Presentation

    Allow your students to use creativity when serving meals to make the dinner table interesting and special by:

    • filling a small basket of flowers, fruit, or colorful decorations
    • using candles as centerpieces
    • creating themed centerpieces
    • playing soft music
    • folding beautiful napkins

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IV Handouts

    • Baking and Cooking Skills Check List
    • Baking and Cooking Terms (Key)
    • Baking and Cooking Terms Flashcards
    • Baking and Cooking Terms
    • Basic Table Setting
    • Basic Table Setting (Key)
    • BINGO Templates
    • Cooking Terms
    • Following Directions
    • Lab Duty Assignments 4 blank
    • Lab Duty Assignments 5 blank
    • Lab Duty Assignments
    • Meal Service
    • Meal Service (Key)
    • Measurement Standards
    • Measurement Standards (Key)
    • Recipe Breakdown
    • Rubric for Laboratory Experience
    • Rubric for Table Settings and Napkin Folds
    • Sample Lab Plan (blank)
    • Sample Lab Plan
    • Sample Lab Prep Sheet
    • Standards of Measurement
    • Start a Conversation Cards
    • Substitutions for Healthier Baking and Cooking
    • Successful Lab Management Guidelines Notes
    • Suggested Guidelines for Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Lab
    • Table Etiquette
    • Tableware Identification
    • Tableware Identification (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • When teaching the table service, demonstrate the correct place settings to students using dishes from your kitchens.
    • Use recipes from the internet, cookbooks, magazines to teach how to read a recipe so students can see the not all recipes are written correctly.
    • Search for a handout on different napkin folds that your students can practice. Make sure to have ironing boards, irons, a spray bottle with water, and starch available. Use the water for practice and the starch for the formal events. Students will learn geometry skills folding napkins (angles, lines, circle, etc.) and impress their family and friends with their skills
    • Flashcards for cooking terms can be made using Quizlet.com.
      Quizlet is the largest flash cards and study games website with over 12 million free sets of flashcards covering every possible subject. It’s the best place to play educational games, memorize vocabulary and study online.
      http://quizlet.com/
    • Allow students to practice different napkin folds. They are actually using geometry when they fold napkins into triangles, rectangles, and so forth.
    • Create Bingo cards for the utensils and terms to review before a test. Search for a website that will allow you to make your own bingo cards. Prizes can be nutritious snacks encouraging students to make wise choices.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. To cook quickly in a little oil, butter, or margarine is to

    • a. stir-fry.
    • b. simmer.
    • c. saute.
    • d. steam.

    2. To cook in an oven is to

    • a. broil.
    • b. preheat.
    • c. roast.
    • d. bake.

    3. Buying fruits and vegetables in season

    • a. can lower the cost and add to the freshness.
    • b. will spoil faster.
    • c. will taste better.
    • d. can be more expensive.

    4. FIFO means

    • a. fire in, fire on.
    • b. flies in, flies out.
    • c. first in, first out.
    • d. fire in, first out.

    5. The way of serving meals in which food is portioned out on individual plates in the kitchen and brought to the table is called

    • a. Family service.
    • b. Plate service.
    • c. Modified English service.
    • d. Formal service.

  • V. Digestion and Metabolism

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student understands the principles of digestion and metabolism.

    • (A) describe the processes of digestion and metabolism
    • (B) calculate and explain basal and activity metabolisms and factors that affect each
    • (C) apply knowledge of digestion and metabolism when making decisions related to food intake and physical fitness
    • (D) locate community resources that promote physical activity and fitness
    • (E) explain the relationship of activity levels and caloric intake to health and wellness, including weight management

    Module Content

    Digestion and Metabolism is the fifth unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Process of Digestion and Metabolism
    • B. Physical Activity and Fitness
    • C. Balance of Caloric Intake and Use

    Module Five Handouts

    Process of Digestion and Metabolism
    Refer to the lesson on our website Maintaining a Healthy Digestive System for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/maintaining-a-healthy-digestive-system/

    The Digestive System

    • Digestion begins in the mouth, when you chew and swallow, and is completed in the small
      intestine.
    • The esophagus connects the throat above with the stomach below.
    • The stomach stores the swallowed food and liquid, mixes the food, liquid, and digestive
      juices, and empties the contents slowly into the small intestine.
    • The liver turns nutrients into forms the body can use.
    • Bile is a substance that helps your body digest and absorb fats. It is produced in the liver and
      stored in the gall bladder until needed.
    • The pancreas produces pancreatic juice that contains enzymes that help break down
      carbohydrates, proteins, and fat.
    • The small intestine produces intestinal juice to further break down food and absorption
      takes place.
    • The large intestine, also called the colon, removes water, potassium and sodium from the
      waste. The remainder is stored as a semi-solid in the lower part of the intestine until it is
      eliminated.

    Why is Digestion Important?

    It’s a Process

    • Food and drink is broken down
    • Body uses the food to build and nourish cells
    • Provides energy
    • Digestion begins

    When you eat foods – such as bread, meat, and vegetables – they are not in a form that the
    body can use as nourishment.
    Food and drink must be changed into smaller molecules of nutrients before they can be
    absorbed into the blood and carried to cells throughout the body.

    Body Mass Index
    Body Mass Index (BMI) is a number calculated from a person’s weight and height. BMI provides a reliable indicator of body fatness for most people and is used to screen for weight categories that may lead to health problems.
    Use the information on this website to show students how to calculate their BMI.
    http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/index.html

    Physical Activity

    Physical Activity and Fitness
    According to ChooseMyPlate.gov., being physically active can improve your health — today, tomorrow, and in the future. However, most people do not do enough physical activity. People of all types, shapes, sizes, and abilities can benefit from being physically active. The more you do, the greater the health benefits and the better you’ll feel.

    For more information on Physical Activity and Sports Nutrition, refer to lesson:
    ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity and Sports Nutrition
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-physical-activity-and-sports-nutrition/

    Click on the links to read more about physical activity.

    Balance of Caloric Intake and Use
    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), and the Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP) have created
    SuperTracker:

    My foods. My fitness. My health.

    Students will be able to log foods they have eaten with physical activity.

    The Daily Food Plan shows your food group targets – what and how much to eat within your calorie allowance. Your food plan is personalized, based on your age, gender, height, weight, and physical activity level.
    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/supertracker-tools/daily-food-plans.html

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module Five Handouts

    • Calculating BMR
    • Factors in Calculating BMR
    • The Digestive System

    Handouts and graphic organizers for ChooseMyPlate – Physical Activity and Sports Nutrition are too numerous to list and link in this section. For access to handouts, visit: http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/choosemyplate-physical-activity-and-sports-nutrition/

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • By allowing students to use take pictures and keep track of the food they eat with their cell phones, you are incorporating technology into your lesson. They will be able to analyze each other’s meals and discuss the nutrients needed lacking, and digestion (dietary fiber).
    • Assign homework by asking students to take a picture of all they foods they eat for three days including a weekend. Most students have a camera on their cell phones to be able to do this. They can download the pictures and examine their choices. For students that do not have access to a camera, they can list all of their meals.
    • Assign students to collect pictures from magazines or clip art depicting at least three of their favorite physical activities. Studies show that if young people like certain physical activities like running, basketball, baseball, dancing, and so forth, they will continue that activity into adulthood. Offer extra credit if student’s take their own pictures exercising.
    • Assign students to research their local community for physical activity programs in their area. Many cities provide park and recreation facilities to keep the youth active.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    • Physical Activity
      Being physically active can improve your health — today, tomorrow, and in the future. However, most people do not do enough physical activity. People of all types, shapes, sizes, and abilities can benefit from being physically active. The more you do, the greater the health benefits and the better you’ll feel.
      The information and tips below can help you learn ways to add physical activity to your life.
      • What is physical activity?
      • Why is it important?
      • How much is needed?
      • How many calories are used?
      • Tips for increasing physical activity

    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/physical-activity.html

    YouTube

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. In what part of the digestive system would you find bile?

    • a. Stomach
    • b. Small intestine
    • c. Pancreas
    • d. Gall bladder

    2. A sedentary person does less than how many minutes of moderate to heavy physical activity a day?

    • a. two hours
    • b. one hour
    • c. 30 minutes
    • d. 15 minutes

    3. Being physically active can help you:

    • a. increase your chances of living longer
    • b. feel better about yourself
    • c. decrease your chances of becoming depressed
    • d. all of the above

    4. A BMI of what number or higher indicates that an adult is obese?

    • a. 20.7
    • b. 25
    • c. 28
    • d. 30

    5. In the digestive system, what does the liver do?

    • a. Stores fat
    • b. Produces bile
    • c. Turns nutrients into forms the body can use
    • d. Stores swallowed food and liquid

  • VI. Lifetime Effects of Nutrition and Wellness

    TEKS Addressed

    (3) The student demonstrate knowledge of nutritionally balanced diets.

    • (A) research the long-term effects of food choices
    • (B) outline strategies for prevention, treatment, and management of diet-related diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, childhood obesity, anorexia, and bulimia
    • (C) determine the effects of food allergies and intolerances on individual and family health
    • (D) plan diets based on life cycle, activity level, nutritional needs, proton control, and food budget
    • (E) develop examples of therapeutic diets
    • (F) analyze advertising claims and fad diets with the recommendations of the Recommended Dietary Allowances
    • (G) analyze current lifestyle habits that may increase health risks
    • (H) identify community programs that provide nutrition and wellness services
    • (I) examine the nutritional value of fast foods and convenience foods
    • (J) read and interpret food labels
    • (K) examine and explain nutritional serving sizes

    Module Content

    Lifetime Effects of Nutrition and Wellness is the sixth unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Effects of Food Choices
    • B. Nutritional Need for Life Cycle and Lifestyle
    • C. Nutrition Content and Portion Sizes

    Module Six Handouts

    Effects of Food Choices
    Refer to the lesson We Are What We Eat – Connecting Food and Health so that students may research long term affects of food choices.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/we-are-what-we-eat-connecting-food-and-health/

    Obesity is a national epidemic and a major contributor to some of the leading causes of death in the U.S., including heart disease, stroke, diabetes and some types of cancer. We need to change our communities into places that strongly support healthy eating and active living.

    • Dying to Be Thin (Free)
      Anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders are on the rise. What can be done?
      Program Description
      In this sobering but ultimately hopeful documentary, NOVA examines a disturbing increase in the prevalence of eating disorders, particularly anorexia and bulimia. Meet students, ballet dancers, fashion models, and other young women who are seeking recovery or have conquered their disease. Discover how leading eating disorder specialists are making dramatic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of these devastating conditions that affect millions of people.
      http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/dying-to-be-thin.html

    This documentary is 53.40 minutes long and can be viewed in 10 or 15 minute intervals each day of the lesson as an anticipatory set or closing summary.

    Nutritional Need for Life Cycle and Lifestyle
    Nutritional needs change throughout the life span from birth to old age.

    The five stages of the life span include:

    • Prenatal Period
    • Infancy
    • Childhood
    • Adolescence
      • Teen Athletes

    • Adulthood
      • Older Adults

    For more information, visit:

    Nutrition Content and Portion Sizes
    Anyone eating on the run or at restaurants has probably noticed that food portions have gotten larger. Some portions are called “super size,” while others have simply grown in size and provide enough food for at least two people. With this growth have come increases in waistlines and body weight.

    To see if you know how today’s portions compare to the portions available 20 years ago, quiz yourself on Portion Distortion I (2003) and Portion Distortion II (2004). You will also learn about the amount of physical activity required to burn off the extra calories provided by today’s portions.
    http://www.choosemyplate.gov/supertracker-tools/portion-distortion.html

    Nutrition Facts Label

    To find out more about the Nutrition Facts Label, refer to the lesson Inside the Package: Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/inside-the-package-understanding-the-nutrition-facts-label/

    Understanding the Nutrition Facts Label has become an important link in maintaining our healthy lifestyles. The FDA regulates the information on food labels to make sure consumers have complete, useful, and accurate information about the foods they buy and eat.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module Six Handouts

    • Certificate of Excellence
    • Eat Right – Shop Smart – Get the Facts on Food Labels
    • Inside the Package
    • KWL Chart – Nutrition Research Assignment
    • Nutrition Facts to Eat Healthier
    • Nutrition Facts to Eat Healthier (Key)
    • Nutrition Research Assignment
    • Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Glogster™ Display
    • Rubric for Fast Food Nutrition Information Visual Display
    • Tips for a Safe and Healthy Lifestyle

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • For the Nutrition Research Assignment, allow the students to choose between a PowerPoint™, Prezi™, a brochure, a written assignment, or a Glogster™. Many students are already familiar with these programs and can make amazing presentations.
    • Show only a few minutes of the Dying to Be Thin video so students will not be bored and class instructional time will be put to good use.
    • Assign students to investigate and read information from reliable nutrition sources, including print media and the internet on topics related to the prevention, treatment and management of diet-related diseases, medical conditions, and eating disorders.
    • Divide students into subgroups and assign nutrient needs during the life cycle. Students can research topics and present to the class and possibly prepare a small meal for each stage of the lifespan.

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    • Dying to Be Thin (Free)
      Anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders are on the rise. What can be done?
      Program Description
      In this sobering but ultimately hopeful documentary, NOVA examines a disturbing increase in the prevalence of eating disorders, particularly anorexia and bulimia. Meet students, ballet dancers, fashion models, and other young women who are seeking recovery or have conquered their disease. Discover how leading eating disorder specialists are making dramatic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of these devastating conditions that affect millions of people.
      http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/body/dying-to-be-thin.html
    • The Obesity Epidemic
      Source: National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health
      Promotion, Division of
      http://www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/ObesityEpidemic/index.html

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What is a major contributor to the leading cause of death in the United States?

    • a. heart attacks
    • b. obesity
    • c. diabetes
    • d. stroke

    2. There are four stages of the life span.

    • a. True
    • b. False
    • c. Never
    • d. Always

    3. The Nutrition Facts label states:

    • a. the part of the food label that give the serving size
    • b. servings per container
    • c. calories per serving and information on some nutrients
    • d. all of the above

    4. Servings per container is listed on the Nutrition Facts label ___________ the serving size.

    • a. directly below
    • b. directly above
    • c. near
    • d. far from

    5. As part of a healthy diet, ___________ in foods such as dry beans, whole grain products, fruits, and vegetables promotes regularity and may decrease your risk of heart disease.

    • a. sodium
    • b. saturated fat
    • c. fiber
    • d. calcium

  • VII. Careers in Nutrition

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student investigates careers in nutrition.

    • (A) compare and contrast education or training needed for careers in nutrition
    • (B) establish personal short-term and long-term career goals
    • (C) analyze entrepreneurial opportunities in nutrition

    Module Content

    Careers in Nutrition is the seventh unit of study in the Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness course. This section contains three units of study that include:

    • A. Training and Education
    • B. Setting Goals
    • C. Entrepreneurship

    Module Seven Handouts

    Refer to the lesson Careers in Nutrition – Keeping Everyone Healthy on our website for more information.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-nutrition-keeping-everyone-healthy/

    A. Training and Education
    Bright Future

    Ther are many job opportunities due to:

    • Childhood obesity
    • Overweight adults
    • Digestive diseases
    • Food onset illnesses (diabetes type2)
    • Exercise and fitness, and for
    • Overall good health

    Explain to students that careers in nutrition are growing for several reasons. Our nation is
    concerned with childhood obesity, adult obesity, digestive diseases, food onset illnesses such as diabetes type 2 and exercise. Many people now want to be fit and healthy.

    Nutrition Professionals

    Can:

    • Teach health
    • Work with a health care team
    • Help a restaurant chain improve meal nutrition
    • Develop nutritious foods
    • Write nutrition updates for media

    Work in:

    • Hospitals
    • Schools and child care centers
    • Nursing homes
    • Government agencies
    • Privately owned businesses

    Explain to students that nutrition professionals are in demand across the country. They can
    teach, research, assist, and write.
    They can work in many places as well. Government agencies would include the WIC program,
    SNAP, and Veterans Administration.

    View a short video from the American Dietetics Association website about dietitians.

    Setting Goals

    Career Goals

    Long term:

    • Make a career plan
    • Follow your career plan
    • Review and update career plan as needed
    • Learn more

    Short term:

    • Develop related skills
    • Practice skills
    • Get experience
    • Gain education and training

    http://www.iseek.org/careers/careergoals.html
    This site is from Minnesota but covers the TEKS objective well.

    View the Venn Diagram Goal Setting: Careers in Nutrition. This graphic organizer will allow your students to think about short and long term goals.

    Entrepreneurship

    People who own and operate their own businesses are called entrepreneurs. Many opportunities exist in the area of nutrition and fitness. Successful entrepreneurs have three key traits.

    • Innovative – are creative, artistic, imaginative, inventive and resourceful
    • Risk takers – are willing to invest their own time and money to their project
    • Persistence – diligent and determined in their product or service.

    View the graphic organizer Entrepreneurship in Nutrition to use with your students so they may explore possible business careers.

    Ask your students for examples of any famous people that have these traits. Possible answers may be:

    • Steve Jobs
    • Mark Zuckerberg
    • Paula Dean
    • Bobby Flay
    • Martha Stewart

    Refer to the End of Course Project Options: Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness for ideas that students may have the opportunity to research and investigate course topics that are of interest to them.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/end-of-course-project-options-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module Seven Handouts

    • Careers in Nutrition Notecards
    • Entrepreneurship in Nutrition
    • Goal Setting: Careers in Nutrition
    • Rubric for Careers in Nutrition Notecards

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Invite the registered dietitian for your school district to speak to your class as what they do for the Child Nutrition program.
    • Invite a registered dietitian from the local hospital, a nutritionist from a fitness center, and/or a professor of nutrition from your local college/university to speak to your class about their careers.
    • Plan a field trip to the Food Service Department of your school district to take a tour of the process schools are required to follow for state guidelines.
    • Research Opportunities. Allow your students to research nutrition occupations using approved databases such as:
      • Encyclopedia Britannica Online
      • World Book Online
      • Ebsco
    • Allow them to:
      • Choose a career
      • Locate information needed
      • Write in note cards
      • Be ready to present to class

    Note: Check with your school library to see if your school subscribes to these online databases. This is a good opportunity for your students to begin using these databases so that they will become familiar with them before they go to college.

    Refer to End of Course Project Options for Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/end-of-course-project-options-lifetime-nutrition-and-wellness/

    References and Resources

    Textbook

    • (2010). Food for today. Columbus, Ohio: McGraw-Hill Glencoe

    Websites

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A career is a(n):

    • a. part-time job.
    • b. full-time job.
    • c. education.
    • d. a long-term job a person pursues.

    2. There are __________ job opportunities for nutrition professionals.

    • a. many
    • b. little or few
    • c. no
    • d. some

    3. An entrepreneur:

    • a. owns and operates their own business.
    • b. works for a family owned business.
    • c. works for other people.
    • d. works for the state or government.

    4. Entrepreneurs are:

    • a. risk takers.
    • b. innovators.
    • c. persistent.
    • d. all of the above.

    5. Nutrition Professionals can

    • a. teach health.
    • b. work with a health care team.
    • c. develop nutritious food.
    • d. all of the above.

  • Quiz

    Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness Online Course

    Progress:

    1. Nutrition is:

    2. Wellness is:

    3. Poor nourishment caused by a lack of nutrients is:

    4. A calorie is defined as the amount of energy needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by how many degrees Celsius?

    5. Good recipes should:

    6. How many food groups are in the ChooseMyPlate icon?

    7. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans are updated:

    8. The five main kitchen hazards are:

    9. The single most effective way to prevent the transfer of bacteria is to:

    10. It is a good idea to list frozen foods at the end of your shopping list because:

    11. The area containing each person’s tableware is called a

    12. How have food portion sizes changed in recent years?

    13. Teamwork should include the following skills:

    14. A well-written recipe will

    15. Leadership is

    16. A team member is absent the day of a foods lab. What should you do?

    17. Team members should help each other by

    18. How many vegetables are needed daily for girls between the ages of 14 and 18 years old?

    19. According to the 10 tips Nutrition Education Series on Salt and Sodium, Americans should reduce their sodium intake to:

    20. The hand washing procedure should take a total of __________ seconds.

    21. The two types of vitamins are

    22. Rickets and Osteomalacia are caused by a lack of what vitamin?

    23. Turn pan handles to the back or middle of the range to

    24. The first step in washing dishes is to

    25. The third step in the five step handwashing process is:

    26. The name for a substance, such as a chemical or organism, that makes food unsafe to eat is a

    27. The most common bacterial cause of diarrhea in the United States, and the most common cause of foodborne deaths.

    28. To cook quickly in a little oil, butter, or margarine is to

    29. To cook in an oven is to

    30. Buying fruits and vegetables in season

    31. FIFO means

    32. The way of serving meals in which food is portioned out on individual plates in the kitchen and brought to the table is called

    33. In what part of the digestive system would you find bile?

    34. A sedentary person does less than how many minutes of moderate to heavy physical activity a day?

    35. Being physically active can help you:

    36. A BMI of what number or higher indicates that an adult is obese?

    37. In the digestive system, what does the liver do?

    38. A career is a(n)

    39. There are __________ job opportunities for nutrition professionals.

    40. An entrepreneur

    41. Entrepreneurs are

    42. Nutrition Professionals can

    43. Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness is part of the __________________________ career cluster.

    44. Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness can be added to _________ sequence of courses.

    45. Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness is a(n) _______________ course that allows students to make informed choices that promotes wellness.

    46. Students taking this course will be able to pursue careers in

    47. Lifetime Nutrition and Wellness is an articulated course for one credit.

    48. CTE stands for

    49. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with

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