Hotel Management Online Course

  • Hotel Management Online Course Introduction

    Hotel lobby

    Hotel Management (One-Half to One Credit)

    Hotel Management Online Teacher Course
    This course focuses on the knowledge and skills needed to pursue staff and management positions available in the hotel industry. This in-depth study of the lodging industry includes departments within a hotel such as: front desk, food and beverage, housekeeping, maintenance, human resources, and accounting. This course will focus on, but not be limited to: professional communication, leadership, management, human resources, technology, and accounting. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Principles of Hospitality and Tourism is the recommended prerequisite for this course.

    The Texas Education Agency also recommends that students have access to computers and the Internet.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Hotel Management is one of 9 courses in the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Articulated Credit
    This course is also available for the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (1 credit) that gives high school students a chance to receive credit at participating community colleges across Texas for taking certain enhanced technical courses during high school.

    For more information, visit:

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and eight modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the beginning and ending of each module for additional information. Each module ends with six multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course, you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to the Introductory Lesson: Hotel Management for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, programs of study and this course.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-hotel-management/

  • I. Leadership

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student demonstrates an understanding that personal success depends on personal effort.

    • (A) demonstrate a proactive understanding of self-responsibility and self-management
    • (B) identify and demonstrate positive work behaviors and personal qualities for employability
    • (C) analyze the effects of health and wellness on employee performance

    (5) The student develops principles in time management, decision making, effective communication, and prioritizing.

    • (A) apply effective practices for managing time and energy
    • (B) implement stress-management techniques
    • (C) analyze various steps in the decision-making process
    • (D) analyze the importance of balancing a career, family, and leisure activities

    (9) The student uses leadership and teamwork skills in collaborating with others to accomplish organizational goals and objectives.

    • (A) apply team-building skills
    • (B) apply decision-making and problem-solving skills
    • (C) apply leadership and teamwork qualities in creating a pleasant working atmosphere
    • (D) participate in community leadership and teamwork opportunities to enhance professional skills

    team building

    Module Content

    • A. Personal success
    • B. Personal time management
    • C. Effective team building skills


    Refer to lesson Leadership with Style for additional resources, lesson ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/leadership-with-style/

    Refer to The Balancing Act: Managing a Career and Family – Hotel Management for additional resources, lesson ideas, and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/the-balancing-act-managing-a-career-and-family-hotel-management/

    Refer to lesson In the Balance for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/in-the-balance/

    Module I Handouts

    A. Personal Success
    Building Expertise – developing the the essential knowledge and skills required to perform on the job at the highest level. Exploring career options is important because the type of business environment chosen for the first job often has a strong influence on the future career path.

    Career exploration of the following hotel management positions:

    • entry-level: first level of employment; requires a high school diploma or equivalent
    • skilled-level: the next level requiring previous experience and may oversee operations
    • supervisory level: manages hourly and supervisory employees
    • management level: responsible for administrative or higher level of the hotel business
    • executive level: financial, operational and leadership required for a business to function efficiently, effectively, and profitability

    Upon entering the workplace, the first job will provide the platform to move employees through their chosen career path with a high rate of success.

    Employees can accomplish this by developing the ability to set strong personal goals and good work habits. Employees must optimize workplace experiences through a willingness to take risks.

    Five key areas aid in assuring personal success:

    • ethics: rules,standards, morals and conduct
    • convictions: fixed or permanent personal or business beliefs
    • self-motivation: encouraging, challenging and developing oneself
    • self-discipline: time management, stress management, and burnout prevention
    • self-esteem: a person’s overall evaluation of his or her own self worth

    A very important part of developing a successful career is having a positive attitude towards life. Respecting and valuing yourself and others is the first step. Self-esteem is crucial in meeting the expectations of the job and ultimately in meeting the expectations of the guests.

    Building blocks for positive self-esteem include:

    • be prepared for tasks
    • be confident in your abilities
    • be positive in your approach
    • be focused on achievement
    • be willing to learn new skills
    • be warm, friendly and inviting
    • always smile and stand up straight

    No one is born with strong self-esteem; it is developed from actions, comments, and attitudes of people surrounding a person as he or she grows into adulthood.

    In the hotel management profession, managers and guests depend on employees to have confidence in themselves and take responsibility for their actions.

    Important parts of self-responsibility include:

    • acknowledging that you are solely responsible for the choices in your life
    • accept that you are responsible for what you choose to feel or think
    • accepting that you cannot blame others for the choices you have made
    • recognizing that you are your best cheerleader; it is not reasonable or healthy for you to depend on others to make you feel good about yourself.
    • taking an honest inventory of your strengths, abilities, talents, virtues, and positive points

    B. Personal Time Management

    Time management is defined as the analysis of how working hours are spent and the prioritization of tasks in order to maximize personal efficiency in the workplace.

    Time management refers to a range of:

    • skills
    • tools
    • techniques

    These skills, tools and techniques are used to manage time when accomplishing:

    • specific tasks
    • projects
    • goals

    Time management skills encompasses a wide scope of activities including:

    • planning
    • allocating
    • goal setting
    • delegation
    • analysis of time spent
    • monitoring
    • organizing
    • scheduling
    • prioritizing

    Initially time management referred to just business or work activities, but eventually the term broadened to include personal activities as well.

    A time management system is a designed combination of:

    • processes
    • tools
    • techniques

    Technology has provided a wealth of tools to assist with the management of personal time and in the workplace. PDA (personal digital assistants), software, electronic notebooks and pads (for example, Nook, Kindle, iPad, Microsoft Surface), online calendars, online meeting sites and conference calls and integrated email tools.

    C. Effective Team Building Skills
    Community and workplace structures require team thinking and group consensus. Everyone operates as a member of many teams. Identified “team skills” can be taught, learned, and transferred to others.

    Morale improves when people identify themselves as a part of a successful team. Persons seen as “team players” are more likely to be hired, retained, and promoted. Employees tend to support the processes and systems they develop as a team.

    Guidelines for Building a Strong Team

    • Establish a team vision – “What are we capable of accomplishing?” “What are our dreams?”
    • Build trust with others – “People need to know you care before they care what you know.”
    • Believe in your own self worth – “Success comes in cans, failures in cannots.”
    • Practice your leadership skills.
    • Help each other be right, rather than be wrong.
    • Help each other win – and take pride in each others accomplishments.
    • Speak positively about each other and about your organization at every opportunity.
    • Do everything with enthusiasm, it’s contagious!
    • Believe in what you are doing and never give up.
    • Whatever you want, give it away.
    • Have fun and communicate that fun to others.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • 12 Stress-Management Techniques
    • 12 Stress-Management Techniques (Key)
    • In the Balance Notes
    • In the Balance Notes (Key)
    • KWL Chart – Life and Career Balance
    • KWL Chart – Leadership
    • Leaders in the Hospitality Industry
    • Leadership with Style Organizer
    • Leadership with Style Organizer (Key)
    • Leadership with Style Quiz
    • Leadership with Style Quiz (Key)
    • Mobile Balancing Activity
    • Name that Style
    • Name that Style (Key)
    • Personal Activities Calendar
    • Rubric for Leaders in the Hospitality Industry Glogster™ EDU
    • Rubric for Leaders in the Hospitality Industry Poster
    • Rubric for Mobile Balancing Activity
    • Rubric for Participation in the Balancing Act Activity
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes
    • The Balancing Act – Managing a Career and Family Notes (Key)
    • The Balancing Act Activity
    • Way to Go Certificate
    • Weekly Planner Example
    • Weekly Planner

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Team Building Activities that focus on: developing trust, communication and accuracy.
    • Blind Jigsaw Puzzle-Cut 11x14 size food photos into about 4-5 pieces. Tape a white poster paper on the wall. Divide students into groups of 4-5. Have one volunteer to be blindfolded while the other three give verbal directions on assembling the puzzle. Give groups 2 minutes to develop a strategy and 10 minutes to put the puzzle together.
    • Tray Waiter Race – provide each team with 1 serving tray, 4 plastic tumblers, 2 pitchers. Divide into teams of 4 and have students create a relay team. Each team member will take turns, filling the glasses from the first pitcher, passing them to the next member who will empty the glasses back into the empty pitcher. The first team to finish wins!
    • Second Hand Story – Divide the class into groups of 4-5 .Pass a written riddle to the first student. Give the students 5 minutes to pass the message to each group member. The group with the most accurate account successfully communicates.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    • The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute
      Established in 1953, the Educational Institute, one of the finest nonprofit member benefits of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, is the premier source for delivering quality hospitality education, training and professional certification that serves the needs of hospitality schools and industries worldwide.
      http://www.ahlei.org/
    • The Hotel & Lodging Association of Greater Houston (HLAGH) is a non-profit organization that represents 300 members comprised of general managers and owners of hotels and motels as well as suppliers, service companies and consultants who sell and service the hospitality industry.
      http://www.houstonhotels.org/about.htm

    YouTube

    Leadership: Module One Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are the five career areas of hotel management?

    • a. entry-level, skilled-level, supervisory, management, and executive
    • b. skilled-level, entry-level, administrative, supervisory, and executive
    • c. entry-level, management, supervisory, administrative, and executive
    • d. entry-level, administrative, management, supervisory, and executive

    2. Time management refers to a range of:

    • a. skills, tools, and techniques
    • b. skills, thoughts, and ideas
    • c. tasks, projects, and goals
    • d. goals, activities and plans

    3. What three things must an executive be an expert at?

    • a. financial, operational, and leadership
    • b. management, operational and leadership
    • c. management, operational and delegation
    • d. financial, administrative and management

    4. What improves significantly among employees who see themselves as part of a team?

    • a. performance
    • b. morale
    • c. attendance
    • d. productivity

    5. A time management system is a designed combination of?

    • a. processes, tools, and techniques
    • b. plans, processes, and tools
    • c. tools, skills, and techniques
    • d. processes, plans, and tools

    6. An entry level job provides a platform to move employees through their chosen career path with a high rate of success.

    • True
    • False

  • II. Employability Skills

    applicant

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student understands the importance of employability skills.

    • (A) identify the required training or education requirements that lead to an appropriate industry certification
    • (B) comprehend and model skills related to seeking employment
    • (C) update a personal career portfolio
    • (D) demonstrate proper interview techniques in applying for employment
    • (E) complete required employment forms such as I-9, work visa, W-4, and licensures to meet employment requirements
    • (F) research the local and regional labor workforce market to determine opportunities for advancement
    • (G) investigate professional organizations and development training opportunities to keep current on relevant trends and information within the industry
    • (H) explore entrepreneurship opportunities

    Module Content

    • A. Industry certification
    • B. Job opportunity outlook
    • C. Marketing yourself
    • D. Workplace documents
    • E. Business ownership


    Refer to Careers in Hotel Management for more information on employment in the Hotel Industry.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-hotel-management/

    Refer to lesson Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/get-that-job-resumes-portfolios-and-interview-skills/

    Module II Handouts

    A. Industry Certification
    The Hotel Management profession is a highly competitive area of the global Hospitality Industry. Once basic skills are mastered, the potential employee must concentrate on developing employability skills in specialized areas of interest.

    For example, the Educational Institute of the American Hotel and Lodging Association offers professional development certifications for executive, management, and supervision levels for each area of hotel service. In addition, certifications for line employees and specialty areas are available.

    Degree seeking professionals may be able to secure several of these certifications as a part of their academic programs. The University of Houston, Conrad N. Hilton School of Hotel Restaurant Management, which is ranked among the top 20 schools in the United States, offers a Leadership Program for students seeking to advance in HRM. The program provides an internship that gives you hands-on industry experience and management training, once the internship is completed.

    Cornell University, ranked number one in the world, offers certifications through a combination of summer and online courses in ten major areas.

    The areas of certification include:

    • Operations
    • Financial Management
    • Food Service Operations
    • Hospitality Management
    • Hospitality Marketing
    • Property Management
    • Real Estate and Investment
    • Revenue Management
    • Strategic Management

    B. Job Opportunity Outlook

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Occupational Outlook Handbook: the employment of lodging managers is expected to grow 8 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations.

    • Potential employees with a college degree in hotel management or hospitality management are expected to have the best job opportunities
    • Salaries range from $29,460 to $87,920, with the median income level at $46,880

    C. Marketing Yourself

    Students must establish themselves as professionals by:

    • “Branding” themselves as a viable asset that can “add value” to the organization’s mission and vision
    • Construct a well-written, clear, concise resume of no more than two pages
    • Creating a portfolio of school or work related work experiences, projects, specialized training, skills, licenses, certifications and point-of-sale technology skills

    A resume is a personal advertising tool that summarizes a potential employee’s:

    • qualifications
    • work experience
    • education
    • achievements

    Portfolios are meant to impress and persuade employers to hire the job applicant. The portfolio may be presented in document, digital or online formats.

    Portfolios should contain items such as:

    • Letters of recommendation
    • Awards and Honors
    • School transcripts
    • Diplomas or degrees
    • Licenses and certifications
    • Community service
    • Military records, awards, or medals
    • Reports
    • Brochures
    • Presentations
    • Publications
    • References (personal and professional)

    D. Workplace Documents
    The application process itself can be very daunting to students who have limited experience.Therefore, it is crucial to prepare and equip students with the skills to accurately complete the application (written or online), I-9, and W-4 forms. In addition, the Human Resources department will provide employees with a benefits package containing information about health insurance, 401k and employee wellness information.

    E. Business Ownership
    “Entrepreneurship: a person who organizes and manages any enterprise, especially a business, usually with considerable initiative and risk.”

    There are two factors to consider regarding business ownership in Hotel Management:
    (1) a start-up business and (2) buying an existing business or franchise.

    Start-up: a company that is in the first stage of its operations; often initially financed by their entrepreneurial founders as they attempt to capitalize on developing a product or service for which they believe there is a demand.

    There are instances when purchasing an existing business or franchise that financial assistance can be secured through a bank loan.

    Persons seeking to start their own business in the hotel or hospitality industry should seek expert help through the SBA (Small Business Administration) or local SBDC (Small Business Development Center).

    The SBA provides assistance primarily through its four programmatic functions:

    • Access to Capital (business financing)
    • Entrepreneurial Development (Education, Information, Technical Assistance & Training)
    • Government Contracting (Federal Procurement)
    • Advocacy (Voice for Small Business)

    The Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) provide a wide array of technical assistance to small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs supporting business performance and sustainability and enhancing the creation of new businesses entities.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module II Handouts

    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Are You a Teen Worker
    • Basic Information for Writing a Résumé (half sheet)
    • Career Portfolio Sections
    • Career Portfolio Sections (Key)
    • Education and Training in Hotel Management
    • Employment Application
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes (Key)
    • Hosp – Lodging Manager (Excel and PFD)
    • Hotel Management Careers O*Net Flashcards
    • Hotels, Motels, and Resorts in Your Area
    • My Employability Skills Checklist
    • Opportunities for Advancement in Hotel Management
    • Opportunities for Advancement in Hotel Management (Key)
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz (Key)
    • Rubric for Career Portfolio
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Rubric for Electronic Glogster™ EDU Career Poster
    • Sample Career Portfolio Checklist
    • Sample Résumé Template
    • Service Learning Log
    • W-4 form

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Role Plays: excellent customer care techniques; how to handle critical care situations; telephone etiquette; how to handle customer complaints.
    • Field Trips: visit to a full service hotel that demonstrates excellent customer service and has the Guest Service GOLD certification.
    • Guest Speakers: such as, the general manager, front desk personnel, guest services director, human resources director, training coordinator or director.
    • Mock Interviews:
      1. Research current openings in local hotels.
      2. Complete a letter of introduction and intent.
      3. Complete a written or online job application.
      4. Create a well written, concise resume.
      5. Conduct mock interview sessions for the various positions.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    • The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute
      Established in 1953, the Educational Institute, one of the finest nonprofit member benefits of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, is the premier source for delivering quality hospitality education, training and professional certification that serves the needs of hospitality schools and industries worldwide.
      http://www.ahlei.org/content.aspx?id=29346
    • Cornell University, Hotel School
      The Cornell School of Hotel Administration offers a combination of inspired classroom teaching and innovative practical experiences.
      http://www.hotelschool.cornell.edu/industry/executive/pdp/cert/
    • The University of Houston, Conrad N. Hilton School of Hotel Restaurant Management
      The University of Houston’s Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management is consistently ranked among the top hospitality programs in the world, offering one-of-a-kind experiential-learning opportunities and three prestigious degrees: a Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management, Master of Science in Hospitality Management and Ph.D. in Hospitality Administration. We ARE hospitality!
      http://www.uh.edu/hilton-college/
    • The BestSchools.org is an independent organization with no ties to any other educational institution. It is edited by James Barham, Ph.D.
      http://www.thebestschools.org/blog/2012/01/20/20-hospitality-programs-united-states/
    • The U. S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics
      The Bureau of Labor Statistics of the U.S. Department of Labor is the principal Federal agency responsible for measuring labor market activity, working conditions, and price changes in the economy.
      http://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/lodging-managers.htm#tab-6
    • U.S. Small Business Administration has delivered millions of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and other forms of assistance to small businesses.
      http://www.sba.gov/
    • SBDC assistance is available virtually anywhere with 63 networks branching out with more than 900 delivery points throughout the U.S., the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico, American Samoa and the U.S. Virgin Islands,.
      http://www.sba.gov/content/small-business-development-centers-sbdcs

    YouTube

    Employability Skills: Module Two Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, lodging management jobs are expected to grow by?

    • a. 12%
    • b. 5%
    • c. 7%
    • d. 8%

    2. The number one ranked hospitality program in the world is?

    • a. The University of Houston
    • b. Cornell University
    • c. Johnson and Whales University
    • d. Michigan State University

    3. A resume is an advertising tool that summarizes a job applicant’s?

    • a. work experience, education, achievements and licenses
    • b. education, qualifications, community service and achievements
    • c. qualifications, work experience, education and achievements
    • d. military records, work experience, education and qualifications

    4. Two of the most important employment documents in the employment process are?

    • a. I-9 and W-4
    • b. I-9 and application
    • c. W-4 and the 401K form
    • d. application and the I-9

    5. A start-up company is usually financed through?

    • a. family and friends
    • b. bank loans
    • c. SBA (Small Business Administration)
    • d. personal funds

    6. Entrepreneurship is a business venture that accompanies very low-risk.

    • True
    • False

  • III. Ethics

    Businessman Writing in Notebook

    TEKS Addressed

    (11) The student knows and understands the importance of professional ethics and legal responsibilities within the hotel industry.

    • (A) demonstrate professional ethical standards
    • (B) interpret and explain written organizational policies and procedures to help employees perform their jobs

    Module Content

    • A. Ethical standards
    • B. Organization policies and procedures

    Module III Handouts

    A. Ethical Standards
    Ethics: the rules or standards governing the conduct of a person or the conduct of the members of a profession. Behaving ethically is just as important as using business etiquette or demonstrating good manners.

    Depending on personal experiences, ethics can mean following the letter of the law, your heart or what others tell you to do.This is often referred to as one’s “moral compass” or “moral character”, which can be influenced by values.

    Morals are defined as the generally accepted customs of conduct and right living by a society, or an individual’s lifetime-learned personal practices of what is right and wrong.

    Values on the other hand, give consideration to someone or something with respect to worth, excellence, usefulness, or importance; to regard or esteem someone or something highly.

    According to the standards of the Hospitality and Tourism Management Program, hotel management employees are taught to R.A.V. E. (Respect and Value Everyone) about their customers.

    Following eight ethical behaviors below assures a high level of industry success:

    • honesty – tell the truth, even if you have done something incorrectly
    • integrity- do not let others change your mind about what you know is right
    • trustworthiness – commit to protecting the interest of guests and others
    • loyalty – maintain the confidentiality of guest and company information
    • fairness – apply the same rules to everyone equally and without bias
    • concern and respect for others – demonstrate care, concern and compassion
    • commitment to excellence – set high standards and give outstanding customer service
    • accountability – be responsible for your own actions

    As a hospitality educator, one of the primary tasks is to approach ethics and ethical decision making by building up the moral character of students.

    B. Organization Policies and Procedures
    Policies and procedures of a company are designed to influence and determine all major decisions, actions, and all activities take place within the boundaries set by them. Procedures are the specific methods employed to express policies in action in day-to-day operations of the organization. Together, policies and procedures ensure that a point of view held by the governing body of an organization is translated into steps that result in an outcome compatible with that view.

    Organizational policies and procedures are typically published in a booklet or other form that is widely accessible to all employees. The policies and procedures are formulated or adopted by an organization to reach its long-term goals.

    They include, but are not limited to, a set of:

    • systematic processes
    • established principles
    • rules and regulations (local, state and federal)
    • guidelines

    Together, policies and procedures help to define what is called a “corporate-culture”. Corporate culture is defined as: the philosophy, values, behavior, dress codes, and so forth, that together constitute the unique style and policies of a company.

    For example, the Hilton Hotel core values are:

    • Hospitality – We’re passionate about delivering exceptional guest experiences.
    • Integrity – We do the right thing, all the time.
    • Leadership – We’re leaders in our industry and in our communities.
    • Teamwork – We’re team players in everything we do.
    • Ownership – We’re the owners of our actions and decisions.
    • Now – We operate with a sense of urgency and discipline.

    The core values of an organization directly reflect the mission, vision and corporate responsibility of that organization.

    Policies and procedures may be established by an executive team, a diverse representation of the organization.

    These policies and procedures are monitored by the Human Resources Department or Personnel. Human Resources encompasses such areas as:

    • employment recruitment and selection
    • policies and procedures
    • staff development and training
    • labor laws (employee rights and responsibilities)
    • employee compensation and benefits
    • risk management
    • employee relations and wellness

    Human Resources also provides interpretation of federal, state and local laws that protect the rights of employees in two areas:

    • equal opportunity
    • workers rights

    Equal opportunity refers to the:

    • Civil Rights Act of 1964, which bans employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin.
    • Equal Opportunity Commission or EEOC, which investigates charges of discrimination and allow jury trials and punitive damages in discrimination cases.
    • Age Discrimination and Employment Act of 1967, which bans discrimination against a worker aged 40 and older.
    • Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, which bans employment of noncitizens who are not authorized to work in the U. S. Bans discrimination against citizens who may appear foreign and against noncitizens who have legal work permits.
    • ADA or American with Disabilities Act of 1990, which bans discrimination against individuals with disabilities in matters of employment, government services, public accommodations, commercial facilities and transportation.

    Policies governing workers rights include:

    • Fair Labor Standards Act – established guidelines for minimum wage, overtime pay, restrictions on employment of children and record keeping.
    • Equal Pay Act of 1963 – states that men and women must be paid equal pay for the same job or substantially similar jobs.
    • Family Medical Leave Act of 1993 – entitles eligible employees up to 12 weeks unpaid leave and job protection of up to one year for specific family and medical reasons.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module III Handouts

    • Employee Rights Poster
    • Family and Medical Leave Act
    • Guidelines for Ethical Behavior
    • Guidelines for Ethical Behavior (Key)
    • KWL for Ethics – Hotel Management
    • Questions for Making Ethical Decisions
    • Questions for Making Ethical Decisions (Key)
    • Rubric for Ethics Skit or Role Play
    • U.S. Department of Labor Basic Information Poster
    • What Would You Do? – Notes
    • What Would You Do? – Notes (Key)
    • What Would You Do? – Scenarios

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Truth or Consequences – divide students into groups of 3-4. Groups will read a scenario about employee relations, guest services or financial responsibility. Students must create a response that demonstrates the most ethical way to resolve the concern.
    • The students will read ethical and unethical scenarios and create a skit to demonstrate the right and wrong way to handle these situations.
    • Create a Jeopardy game using vocabulary and the federal, state and local regulations that are required for compliance. Divide students into teams to compete while learning the content.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    Ethics: Module Three Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Ethical standards are rules that govern a person’s?

    • a. conduct of a person
    • b. conduct of members of business profession
    • c. ethical behaviors
    • d. all of the above

    2. Which of the following is NOT considered one of the eight ethical behaviors?

    • a. trustworthy
    • b. dedication
    • c. honesty
    • d. integrity

    3. Which of the following IS included in establishing policies and procedures?

    • a. rules and regulations (local, state and federal)
    • b. corporate dress code
    • c. mission and vision statements
    • d. employee suggestions

    4. Policies governing workers’ rights laws include all but one of the following?

    • a. Fair Labor Standards Act
    • b. Equal Pay Act
    • c. Family Medical Leave Act
    • d. Age Discrimination Employment Act

    5. Which one of the following is NOT included in Fair Labor Standards Act?

    • a. minimum wage violations
    • b. overtime pay violations
    • c. restrictions of employment of children
    • d. public accommodations violations

    6. The American with Disabilities act covers discrimination of persons riding public transportation as well as private amusement parks.

    • True
    • False

  • IV. Health, Safety, and Environmental Management in the Workplace

    environmental management

    TEKS Addressed

    (10) The student understands the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organizational performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) assess workplace conditions with regard to safety and health
    • (B) apply safety and sanitation standards common to the workplace
    • (C) analyze potential effects caused by common chemical and hazardous materials
    • (D) demonstrate first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation skills
    • (E) research sources of food-borne illness and determine ways to prevent them

    Module Content

    • A. Personal hygiene
    • B. Workplace safety
    • C. Sanitation
    • D. Emergency procedures

    Module IVa Handouts
    Module IVb Handouts

    A. Personal Hygiene

    Components of a Good Personal Hygiene Program

    • Good hand washing practices is the greatest defense against spreading infectious diseases
    • Maintaining personal cleanliness such as bathing daily, washing hair oral hygiene
    • Wearing clean and appropriate uniforms and following dress codes
    • Avoiding certain habits and actions that can result in direct or cross contamination of foods
    • Maintaining good health and reporting illness

    As part of hotel management, certifications in food service sanitation, alcohol consumption, disposing of hazardous waste, first aid and CPR are required when serving the public. Various levels of these certifications are available through the hotel or approved local agencies.

    B. Workplace Safety
    Safety is the responsibility of every employee. The main goal is prevention. The entire staff must work diligently to maintain a low-risk environment for the health and well being of the guests and employees. Workplace accidents cause higher absenteeism which can adversely impact each department resulting in a lower quality of guest services.

    Two of the primary agencies that provide the majority of workplace regulations are OSHA and the EPA. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) is a Federal agency established in 1970 to ensure that the safety and health of American workers were protected.

    The mission of EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) is to protect human health and the environment. In response to EPA guidelines and regulations, many hotels have established “Green Practices”. Green Practices are environmentally friendly and economically responsible decisions and processes that guarantee natural resources will continue to be readily available in the future.

    The term “going green” describes the process of making decisions about how to conduct business and provide services to hotel guests while taking into consideration the impact those decisions will have on the environment.

    Five of the main departments in a hotel that benefit from green practices are:

    • Housekeeping Operations
    • Facilities Management
    • Food and Beverage Services
    • Operational Finance
    • Sales and Marketing

    Some green practices include:

    • recycling
    • energy conservation
    • energy efficient equipment
    • solid waste management
    • water conservation
    • pollution prevention
    • land use management
    • sustainability practices – systems, methods and materials that minimize environmental impacts over a period of time

    Many hotels maintain compliance of OSHA and EPA regulations by establishing a Risk Management program.

    Risk management is the process of:

    • assessing existing risks
    • taking action to minimize or prevent the risks, and
    • preventing unforeseen accidental loss by implementing a safety program

    Most risk management programs operate through a safety team that monitors guidelines set by the company, OSHA (Occupational Safety and Hazard Association) and the local health department. Additional standards and regulations must be maintained to prevent operational hazards such as fire safety, slips, trips, falls and safe lifting.

    The following are ffifteen areas established by the National Safety Council (NSC) for implementing a risk management program:

    • Hazard Recognition, Evaluation and Control (action plans)
    • Workplace Design and Engineering (facility planning)
    • Safety Performance Management (best business practices)
    • Regulatory Compliance Management (OSHA, Occupational Safety and Hazard Administration, EPA, Environment Protection Agency)
    • Occupational Health (wellness programs)
    • Information Collection (data, reports, statistics)
    • Employee Involvement (tasks force)
    • Motivation, Behavior, and Attitudes (employee incentives)
    • Training and Orientation (in-service)
    • Organizational Communications (newsletters, website)
    • Management and Control of External Exposures (“what if?”, worst-case scenarios)
    • Environmental Management (health education)
    • Workplace Planning and Staffing (Americans with Disabilities Act)
    • Assessment, Audits and Evaluations (third-party evaluations)

    Hazardous materials are substances that are:

    • either flammable or combustible
    • explosive
    • toxic
    • noxious
    • corrosive
    • oxidize
    • an irritant or radioactive

    A hazardous material spill or release can pose a risk to life, health or property. An incident can result in the evacuation of a few people, a section of a facility or an entire neighborhood.

    Therefore, maintaining MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) is crucial to operational safety.

    C. Sanitation
    Food safety and sanitation, along with sanitation of the facility, are all key factors in maintain a healthful environment. A formal HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) System must be established. The written HACCP plan must detail hazards, identify the CCP’s critical limits, specify CCP monitoring and methods of record keeping, and outline a strategy for implementing the plan.

    D. Emergency Procedures
    Establishing an emergency preparedness plan is critical to the upkeep of the facility as well as emergency procedures for natural disasters, severe weather, power outages and anti-terrorism.

    Maintaining the facility involves such areas as:

    • routine repairs
    • grounds keeping
    • exterior building maintenance
    • interior facility upkeep

    Emergency preparedness plans include: Plan, organize, equip, train, exercise (practice), evaluate and improve.

    The following risk factors to be considered are:

    • Shelter in place: taking immediate shelter where you are – work, home, or school – and remaining there until you are told by the authorities it is safe to leave
    • Natural disasters: floods, earthquakes, and wildfires
    • Severe weather: hurricanes, tornadoes, blizzards and whiteout conditions
    • Power Outages
    • Terrorism

    Fire Safety Plans are also a part of preparedness in the hospitality and tourism industry and are a very important part of a safety program.

    A fire safety plan must include:

    • Fire Protection Systems: alarms, sprinklers, fireproof doors, and guest room smoke detectors
    • Written Procedures: for reporting a fire, notifying, relocating and evaluating occupants
    • Site Plan: shows guest assembly points, locations of fire hydrants, emergency vehicle access routes
    • Posted Floor Plans: exits, primary and secondary evacuation routes, ADA exit routes, refuge areas, manual fire alarm boxes, portable fire extinguishers, wall-mounted occupant-use hose stations
    • Fire Alarm Annunciator and Controls
    • Major Fire Hazard List
    • Identified Assigned Personnel for prevention, maintenance and emergency response

    First Aid
    A good first-aid program requires equipment, training, a concerned attitude for the injured, and a thorough follow-up.

    To ensure employee and customer safety, always remember the following points:

    • accidents can be prevented
    • accidents have serious results
    • you have a responsibility to keep yourself safe
    • you have a responsibility to keep your guests safe and other employees safe

    First aid is medical treatment given to an injured person either for light injuries or until more complete treatment can be provided by emergency personnel.

    Hospitality Industry employees must be familiar with these basic first aid procedures:

    • how to prevent and handle minor cuts, scrapes and burns
    • how to prevent and handle chemical burns
    • how to properly lift and carry objects to prevent sprains and strains
    • how to administer CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)
    • how to perform the Heimlich Maneuver (child/adult)
    • how to clean and dispose of hazardous waste
    • how to identify some external threats to an operation

    The Heimlich maneuver (HIME-lik mah-NOO-ver) removes food or other obstacles from the airway of a choking person.

    CPR stands for cardiopulmonary resuscitation which restores breathing and heartbeat to injured persons who show no signs of breathing or pulse. Training and certification for both CPR and the Heimlich maneuver must be renewed every year from a recognized provider of first-aid-training.

    Managers or supervisors should have at least one certified employee on every shift. First aid kits, AED (Automatic External Defibrillator), gloves, goggles, and other protective equipment must be easily available and accessible.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IVa Handouts
    Module IVb Handouts

    • A to Z Index of Foodborne Illness Flashcards
    • All About OSHA
    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • Job Safety and Health – It’s the Law! Poster
    • OSHA at a Glance
    • Rubric for Oral Presentation of Foodborne Illness
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines Notes
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines Notes (Key)
    • TFER Handwashing Poster
    • Worker’s Rights

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Invite three to four professionals to serve as health and safety panel to review the following areas: first aid (nurse), fire safety (fire department), sanitation (health department). The students will develop two to three questions to ask the panel and stimulate discussions.
    • The students will research and create PowerPoint™ presentations on the following federal agencies: OSHA, FDA, EPA, USDA, and so forth.
    • The students will research and review MSDS sheets. Create a scavenger hunt for students to locate the chemicals on the MSDS sheets and identify the following: proper storage, usage and emergency procedures.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • ServSafe Certified Food Service Management, 6th Edition. (2011). Chicago, IL: National Restaurant Association.
    • Foundations of Restaurant Management and Culinary Arts, Level 1. (2011). Chicago, IL: Prentice Hall/Pearson. National Restaurant Association.

    Websites

    • Material Safety Data Sheets
      Hazard Communication Standard: Safety Data Sheets
      https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3514.html
    • ServSafe® is a program of the National Restaurant Association
      ServSafe® and ServSafe Alcohol® training and certification are widely recognized and accepted. Specific food and alcohol regulatory requirements vary from state to state.
      http://www.servsafe.com/home
    • ServSafe Quiz Flash Cards
      http://quizlet.com/7987853/servsafe-flashcards-chapter-4-flash-cards/
      www.osha.gov
    • U. S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health
      With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.
      http://www.osha.gov/
    • EPA
      Born in the wake of elevated concern about environmental pollution, EPA was established on December 2, 1970 to consolidate in one agency a variety of federal research, monitoring, standard-setting and enforcement activities to ensure environmental protection.
      http://www.epa.gov/aboutepa/

    YouTube

    Health, Safety and Environmental Management in the Workplace: Module Four Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. One of the best preventive measures against spreading infectious diseases is?

    • a. wearing clean clothes
    • b. bathing or showering daily
    • c. reporting illnesses to your manager
    • d. good hand washing practices

    2. Two of the primary agencies that provide the majority of workplace regulations are?

    • a.EPA and USDA
    • b.OSHA and EPA
    • c.OSHA and FDA
    • d.EPA and EEOC

    3. MSDS sheets provide information about handling?

    • a. hazardous chemicals
    • b. sustainable materials
    • c. recyclable materials
    • d. hazardous waste

    4. The formal system established to monitor food safety is?

    • a. HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point)
    • b. OSHA (Occupational Safety and Hazard)
    • c. MSDA (Material Safety Data Sheets)
    • d. FDA (Food and Drug Administration)

    5. Managers must have at least one of the following certified employees on every shift?

    • a. Sanitation and Food Safety Certification
    • b. CPR Certification
    • c. Alcohol Training and Certification
    • d. All of the above

    6. Failing to provide employees with goggles and masks for handling hazardous chemicals would be considered an OSHA violation.

    • True
    • False

  • V. Introduction to the Hotel Industry

    no vacancy

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, and the larger environment of the hotel industry.

    • (A) distinguish among the duties and responsibilities within each department
    • (B) implement quality-control standards and practices
    • (C) compare and contrast full service hotels and limited service properties
    • (D) compare and contrast chain and franchise hotels, including revenue and support centers

    Module Content

    • A. Types of hotels
    • B. Service levels
    • C. Ownership

    Refer to the following lessons to learn more about the different types of lodgings, the departments within each lodging and the differences between chain and franchise hotels at:

    Module V Handouts

    A. Types of Hotels

    • Hotel: An establishment that provides lodging and usually meals, entertainment, and various personal services for the public
    • Motel: An establishment that provides lodging for motorists in rooms usually having direct access to an open parking area; also called motor court, motor lodge
    • Inn: An establishment for the lodging and entertaining of travelers;tavern
    • Boutique Hotels: A small luxury hotel offering premium services, often located in a fashionable location
    • Bed-and Breakfasts: Better known as a B & B is a property that is usually a private home converted into a hotel business for overnight guests. The owner acts as the host or hostess and will welcome each guest as a temporary member of the family. Breakfast is always included in the room rate and guests expect the entire stay to feel both warm and welcoming.
    • Hostels: An inexpensive, supervised lodging place for young people on bicycle trips, hikes, and so forth
    • Campsites and Lodges: A place used for outdoor lodging; a small, makeshift or crude shelter or habitation, as of boughs, poles, skins, earth, or rough boards; cabin or hut. An example of an old concept made new is “Glamping” (glamor camping) which often uses upscale cabins or Yurts. A Yurt is a circular domed tent of skins or felt stretched over a collapsible lattice framework and used by pastoral peoples of inner Asia; also, a structure that resembles a yurt usually in size and design.

    B. Service Levels

    • One Diamond: These establishments typically appeal to the budget-minded traveler. They provide essential, no-frills accommodations. They meet the basic requirements pertaining to comfort, cleanliness, and hospitality.
    • Two Diamond: These establishments appeal to the traveler seeking more than the basic accommodations. There are modest enhancements to the overall physical attributes, design elements, and amenities of the facility typically at a moderate price.
    • Three Diamond: These establishments appeal to the traveler with comprehensive needs. Properties are multifaceted with a distinguished style, including marked upgrades in the quality of physical attributes, amenities, and level of comfort provided.
    • Four Diamond: These establishments are upscale in all areas. Accommodations are progressively more refined and stylish. The physical attributes reflect an obvious enhanced level of quality throughout. The fundamental hallmarks at this level include an extensive array of amenities combined with a high degree of hospitality, service, and attention to detail.
    • Five Diamond: These establishments reflect the characteristics of the ultimate in luxury and sophistication. Accommodations are first class. The physical attributes are extraordinary in every manner. The fundamental hallmarks at this level are to meticulously serve and exceed all guest expectations while maintaining an impeccable standard of excellence. Many personalized services and amenities enhance an unmatched level of comfort.
    • Luxury: Upscale; These establishments are full-service accommodations that provide the traveler with “plush” surroundings. Some amenities include linens, furniture. 24 hour services, concierge, valet and other on-site services such as full-service restaurants, bars or clubs, cleaners, business center, salon and day spa. Many carry the AAA “five-diamond” rating, while others carry the Forbes “five-star” rating.
    • Resorts: A resort is a vacation destination and can be a hotel or large property. Resorts offers a variety of activities for you such as golf, tennis, wave runners, beaches, and swimming. They will also offer spa treatments, workout rooms, and massages. Usually they will also offer shopping and facilities for meetings, weddings or banquets.

    Forbes Travel Guide initiated the five star rating in 1958—longer than any other site or company. It ranks hotels, spas and restaurants from one star to five stars all over the world. The Five Diamond rating was developed by AAA in 1977 for qualified hotels and restaurants in North America. Less than 35% of Five Diamond hotels are named to the Five Star list.

    C. Ownership

    • Corporation: An association of individuals, created by law or under authority of law, having a continuous existence independent of the existences of its members, and powers and liabilities distinct from those of its members. See also municipal corporation, public corporation.
    • Franchise: A privilege of a public nature conferred on an individual, group, or company by a government.
    • Management Groups: Multiple business partners or companies that come together for a common purpose or business venture.
    • Sole-Proprietorship: The owner of a business establishment, a hotel, etc.; a person who has the exclusive right or title to something; an owner, as of real property.
    • Partnership: A relationship resembling a legal partnership and usually involving close cooperation between parties having specified and joint rights and responsibilities.
    • LLC (Limited Liability Company): a company in which the shareholders cannot be assessed for debts of the company beyond the sum they still have invested in the company.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module V Handouts

    Types of Lodging Handouts

    • Amenities and Properties T Chart
    • Hotel Tour Worksheet
    • Rubric for PowerPoint™ Presentation
    • Types of Lodging Properties PowerPoint™ Project
    • Types of Lodging Properties Student Notes
    • Types of Lodging Properties Quiz

    Working Together: Hotel Departments Handouts

    • Hotel Department Job Titles
    • Hotel Department Job Titles (Key)
    • Rubric for 3D Graphic Organizer Project
    • Working Together Hotel Departments Quiz
    • Working Together Hotel Departments Quiz (Key)
    • Working Together Hotel Departments 3D Graphic Organizer Project
    • Working Together Hotel Departments Guided Notes
    • Working Together Hotel Departments Guided Notes (Key)

    Hotel Management and Ownership Handouts

    • Hotel Management and Ownership Guided Notes
    • Hotel Management and Ownership Rubric
    • Hotel Ownership Quiz
    • Hotel Venn Diagram

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Hotel Project-The student will:
      • conduct on site or phone interviews with a hotel owner/general manger to determine the roles, responsibilities, and best business practices.
      • select a business concept (for example: Bed and Breakfast/Sole Proprietorship)
      • research the location, location, location
      • create the design concept
      • develop the facility layout and design
      • design the exterior and elevations
      • select the furniture, fixtures and equipment
      • create two marketing strategies (for example website and Constant Contact)
      • develop PowerPoint™ or tri-fold display presentations

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    Introduction to the Hotel Industry: Module Five Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A small luxury hotel offering premium services in a fashionable location is a?

    • a. Bed and Breakfast
    • b. Hostel
    • c. Resort
    • d. Boutique Hotel

    2. Most luxury hotels in North America will typically carry a service rating of?

    • a. Five Diamond
    • b. Triple A
    • c. Five Star
    • d. Gold Star

    3. The percentage of five-diamond hotels that are named five-star hotels is?

    • a. 45%
    • b. more than 50%
    • c. 35%
    • d. less than 35%

    4. Hotels with multiple business partners or companies are called?

    • a. Franchise
    • b. Corporation
    • c. Management Group
    • d. Limited Liability Company

    5. A hotel independently owned by one person that is not part of a chain is called a?

    • a. Limited Liability Company
    • b. Partnership
    • c. Sole Proprietorship
    • d. Start-up Company

    6. Shareholders in an LLC can be held responsible for the debts of the company above the level of their current investment.

    • True
    • False

  • VI. Professional Communication

    communication

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees.

    • (C) demonstrate proper techniques for using telecommunications equipment
    • (D) interpret verbal and nonverbal cues to enhance communication with individuals such as coworkers, customers, and clients
    • (E) locate written information used to communicate with individuals such as coworkers and customers
    • (F) apply active listening to obtain and clarify information
    • (G) follow directions and procedures independently

    (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovation, and creativity independently and in teams.

    • (A) generate creative ideas to solve problems by brainstorming possible solutions
    • (B) employ critical-thinking and interpersonal skills to resolve conflicts with individuals such as coworkers, employers, customers, and clients

    Module Content

    • A. Verbal
    • B. Nonverbal
    • C. Written
    • D. Oral
    • E. Problem solving
    • F. Conflict resolution

    Refer to lesson Hotel Marketing and Communication: The Cornerstones for more activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/hotel-marketing-and-communication-the-cornerstones/

    Refer to lesson Let’s Talk It Over – Telecommunication for more activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/lets-talk-it-over-telecommunication/

    Refert to lesson Let’s Work It Out – Applying Conflict Resolution Skills for more activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/lets-work-it-out-applying-conflict-resolution-skills/

    Module VI Handouts

    A. Verbal

    Verbal Communication = 38 percent of what others understand when you communicate.

    • Verbal messages- choose your words wisely
    • Active listening-tells others that you care about what they have to say.

    B. Nonverbal

    Nonverbal Communication = 62 percent of what others understand when you communicate.

    • Body language (contributes 55 percent of what is communicated non-verbally)
    • Vocal quality (contributes 7 percent of what is communicated non-verbally)

    C. Written
    Written communication can take a variety of forms from a formal business letter to a brief e-mail.

    Written communication should contain:

    • correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
    • use standard English and complete sentences
    • define related business acronyms (a word formed from a sequence of initials or groups of letters.)
    • be brief and to the point
    • never use text speech!
    • write for easy reading
    • provide accurate information and facts
    • keep a record of what is said and done
    • send written communication only to those who need to be involved

    E-mail Etiquette

    • remember, this is a business (not personal) e-mail
    • reply the same day as sender’s e-mail is received
    • use proper spelling, grammar, and punctuation
    • avoid text speech such as NRN (no reply necessary) or RRQ (return receipt requested)
    • never write in all UPPER CASE letters
    • reply to only the people who need to hear from you
    • use spell check
    • never use e-mail for confidential information
    • delete chain letters immediately

    D. Oral
    Oral Communication is being able to articulate your ideas and information in a clear and concise manner.

    As you communicate verbally:

    • know your audience
    • listen first, speak second
    • ask questions for clarification
    • repeat the facts back to the person
    • stay focused on the topic being discussed
    • be respectful and speak in a professional tone of voice
    • avoid slang or unfamiliar “jargon”- the vocabulary peculiar to a particular industry, profession, or work group.

    E. Problem Solving
    The CQI (Continuous Quality Improvement) process uses a team approach to accomplish operational changes.
    Change occurs by following sequential steps that focus on changing procedures, empowering employees, placing customers first, and achieving long-term organizational commitment.

    The Six-Step Problem Solving Discipline Approach, Problem Solving Discipline (PSD) Approach (Rampersad, 2001)

    • Step 1: Define Area(s) for Improvement
    • Step 2: Identify All Possible Causes
    • Step 3: Develop CQI Action Plan
    • Step 4: Implement CQI Action Plan
    • Step 5: Evaluate Measurement Outcome for Program Improvement
    • Step 6: Standardize CQI Process

    F. Conflict Resolution
    Conflict: when one or both parties are not able to secure what they need or want and are actively seeking their own goals

    Causes of Conflict

    • Misunderstanding: when individuals do not hear what is being said
    • Personality clashes: when individuals do not value “people just like me
    • Competition for resources: when employees believe they are better off competing for resources rather than cooperating
    • Authority issues: when employees lack confidence in their leaders or perceive overuse of authority
    • Lack of cooperation: when one person does not share information with the whole group
    • Differences over style: when agreement does not exist on standard ways of completing a task
    • Low performance: when individuals are not working to their potential
    • Value or goal differences: when individuals value different outcomes and objectives

    There are both negative outcomes and positive values that occur when conflict arises.

    When conflict is destructive:

    • people are not able to work on what is most important
    • increased rifts between people do not foster healing
    • tension increases, strengthening opposite views
    • people feel inadequate or incapable

    When conflict is constructive:

    • differences are brought out in the open
    • mutual understanding is fostered
    • people learn to think differently about how they act or think
    • people commit their energy and ideas toward solutions or resolutions

    There are several approaches to handling conflicts:

    • Avoid – Non-confrontational; denies issues are a problem. This is the style of a highly dependent person without inner direction. May postpone conflict or avoid it at all costs. Moving away, leaving, losing.
    • Accommodate – Agreeable, non-assertive; cooperative even at the expense of personal goals. Yielding, moving toward the other person, friendly.
    • Compete – Uses power, position, personality, or status to get own way. Academics, athletics and the law can reflect this mindset. Assertive and aggressive. Forceful, moving against others.
    • Compromise – Aggressive but cooperative. Tries to bargain, compromise, and split the difference.
    • Collaborate – High respect for mutual benefit. Recognizes the needs and mutual benefits of both parties.

    Strives for win/win or recognizes abilities and expertise of all.
    Integrating, working toward solution with others.

    As a manager or employee in the Hotel Management Industry, the best business practice is to achieve a “win-win” situation for guests and employees. Fostering healthy relationships will produce positive outcomes when conflict arises.

    When the following conditions are in place, the likelihood of a positive resolution increases:

    • Commitment to find a resolution that is mutually beneficial. When you really want something to work, the chances for success increases.
    • Trust. Trust is integrity wrapped in truth and honesty!
    • Having a frame of mind that there is more than one way to look at the issues. If you believe that your way is the only way, then resolution is difficult.
    • Belief that a solution exists. If you do not believe it is possible for resolution, then why work to resolve the conflict?
    • Commitment to stay in the communication process. Resolution can take a lot of time and effort.

    To Achieve Win/Win Results

    • Gain participation from everyone involved in the conflict.
    • State the reason to work on a solution.
    • Have each party see the problem/situation from the other point of view. State what you want. Repeat what you hear.
    • Identify the key issues and concerns involved.
    • Determine what results would constitute a fully acceptable solution.
    • State what you WANT to happen when results have been achieved.
    • Include the results for you, for your relationships, and for job or task achievement.
    • Agree to work toward resolution and schedule a follow-up meeting if necessary.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VI Handouts

    • Conflicts in the Workplace – Scenarios
    • Email Communication Practice
    • Hotel Brochure Activity
    • Hotel Brochure Rubric
    • Hotel Marketing and Communication KWL
    • Hotel Marketing and Communication Notes
    • KWL Chart – Telecommunications
    • Let’s Talk It Over Notes
    • Let’s Talk It Over Notes (Key)
    • Let’s Work It Out Notes
    • Let’s Work It Out Notes (Key)
    • Marketing and Communications: The Cornerstones Quiz
    • Marketing and Communications: The Cornerstones Quiz (Key)
    • Methods Used to Resolve Conflicts
    • Methods Used to Resolve Conflicts (Key)
    • Phone Courtesy Scenarios
    • Rubric for Phone Courtesy Role-Play and Email Communications
    • Rubric for Teamwork and Conflict Resolution Activities
    • Steps to Resolve Conflict
    • The Marketing Mix
    • The Marketing Mix (Key)
    • Top Ten Telephone Practices

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Run Tell That! – Divide students into groups of four. The students will review case studies of customer concerns. Each student will take on a role, (manager, customer, employee, supervisor) The students will develop two responses to the situation, one correct and one incorrect.
    • Conflict Resolution – provide students with various conflict scenarios (employee/employee, employee/guest, employee/manager) The students will decide which method of conflict resolution will work best for each scenario. ( Avoid, Compromise, Compete, Collaborate)

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Building Human Resource Management Skills-Management Skills for Success,Dealing with Conflict in the Workplace. (2001). University of Mississippi. National Food Service Management Institute.
    • Continuous Quality Improvement Process. (2006). University of Mississippi. National Food Service Management Institute
    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.
    • Rampersad, H, K. (2001). Total quality Management: An executive guide to continuous improvement. (pp 11-18). Heidelberg, Germany: Springer-Verlag.

    Websites

    • NFSMI
      The National Food Service Management Institute (NFSMI), part of the School of Applied Science at The University of Mississippi, is the only federally funded national center dedicated to applied research, education and training, and technical assistance for child nutrition programs.
      http://www.nfsmi.org/

    Professional Communication: Module Six Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. All of these are established forms of communication EXCEPT?

    • a. Written
    • b. Verbal
    • c. Nonverbal
    • d. Passive

    2. Verbal communication is ____ percentage of what others understand when you communicate?

    • a. 7%
    • b. 55%
    • c. 62%
    • d. 38%

    3. Written communication should contain which one of the following?

    • a. correct grammar and punctuation
    • b. words spelled correctly
    • c. complete sentences
    • d. all of the above

    4. When communicating orally, which of the following is NOT important?

    • a. know your audience
    • b. speak in a professional tone of voice
    • c. stay focused on the topic
    • d. use familiar slang words

    5. Continuous Quality Improvement process uses a (n) ________ to accomplish operational changes?

    • a. team approach
    • b. consultant
    • c. executive committee
    • d. evaluation

    6. Avoiding confrontations can often postpone conflicts in the workplace.

    • True
    • False

  • VII. Guest Services

    bell

    TEKS Addressed

    (12) The student understands the knowledge and skills required for careers in the hotel management industry.

    • (A) develop job-specific technical vocabulary
    • (B) explain procedures to meet guest needs, including guest registration, rate assignment, room assignment, and determination of payment methods
    • (C) determine the functions of meeting and event planning
    • (D) evaluate current and emerging technologies to improve guest services
    • (E) understand the importance of check-out procedures to ensure guest satisfaction and verify settlement of account

    Module Content

    • A. Service strategies
    • B. Emerging technologies

    Module VII Handouts

    A. Service Strategies
    Employees must be able to provide the guests with the highest level of customer services by being able to see the experience from two very different points of view.

    The two points of view are:

    1. The perception of the employee of what he/she is providing the guest.
    2. The perception of the guest of what level of service the employee is providing.

    In order to provide an outstanding guest experience, the employee must:

    • demonstrate outstanding job skills
    • project positive energy and self-image
    • create an exceptional service environment
    • above all: respect and value everyone (R.A.V. E.)

    According to the standards set by the American Hotel and Motel Associations’ Educational Institute, all employees should strive to provide guests with a Guest Service GOLD experience.

    Some of the Guest Service Gold basic principals are:

    • Wear a smile and be polite
    • Make eye contact
    • Use the guest’s name
    • Wear your name tag at all times
    • Present a professional appearance
    • Treat guests as individuals
    • Make guests feel special
    • Meet and attempt to exceed guests expectations

    B. Emerging Technologies

    Two areas of emerging technologies within the hospitality industry are:

    • GSM (Guest Service Measurement) Technology
    • POS (Point of Sale) Technology

    Guest Service Measurement is a tool used to measure the satisfaction level of the guests’ experience to gain feedback. This is the best way to identify areas that need improvement.

    Point of Sale is the device or location where a sale or financial transaction occurs.
    In the climate of the increase in use of electronic payment, fraud and identity theft cases have risen significantly.

    According to the Identity Theft Assistance Center, and research released by Javelin Strategy & Research (www.javelinstrategy.com), reports that in 2011 identity theft has increased by 13 percent.

    Therefore, it is very important to protect the sensitive information of guests at all times.

    Sensitive information is defined as a person’s information that is confidential and not available to the public such as:

    • social security number
    • driver’s license number
    • state identification card number
    • bank account numbers
    • credit/debit card numbers

    In handling transactions, the employee should know:

    • What information is safe to ask for verbally
    • How to protect the guest privacy and sensitive information
    • How to properly collect payment and protect the company against fraud

    Financial security can be accomplished by establishing and maintaining:

    • strict company policies
    • safeguards and controls of the financial transaction process
    • safety and security for guest valuables, cash and sensitive guest information

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VII Handouts

    • Event or Meeting Planner Checklist
    • Events and Meetings
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Notes
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Notes (Key)
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Quiz
    • Guest Services – First Impressions Quiz (Key)
    • KWL Chart – Guest Services

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    1. Being Served

    • Alternate roles as guests and employees of the hotel:
      • General Manager
      • Front desk operations
      • Housekeeping
      • Waiter/waitress
      • Cashier
      • Food and beverage director
      • Concierge
      • Chief Engineer

    Provide scenarios demonstrating a range of customer service from excellent to unacceptable.
    Students will act out the scenario and then create three strategies for improving customer service.

    2. Local Expert

    • Invite a General Manager for a local hotel to visit the classroom to talk to students about
      A day in the life of a GM.
    • Ask the presenter to bring a PowerPoint™ presentation or use the hotel website as “virtual tour for students”
      Divide into groups of 3 or 4.
      Groups will conduct research about the hotel from the corporate website, AAA, travel guides etc.
      Each group will write three questions to ask the presenter at the end of the presentation

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    • The American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute
      Established in 1953, the Educational Institute, one of the finest nonprofit member benefits of the American Hotel & Lodging Association, is the premier source for delivering quality hospitality education, training and professional certification that serves the needs of hospitality schools and industries worldwide.
      http://www.ahla.com/
    • ITAC
      The Identity Theft Assistance Center
      The leading consumer advocate on identity fraud and the financial services industry’s identity management solution center. An affiliate of The Financial Services Roundtable, ITAC is supported by the industry as a free service for our customers. Since 2004, ITAC has helped tens of thousands of consumers restore their identity.
      http://www.identitytheftassistance.org/pageview.php?cateid=47

    YouTube™:

    • Hilton Hotels & Resorts Presents The Ideal Lobby
      The new lobby design by Hilton Hotels & Resorts reflects the brand’s commitment to exploring the latest design and technology innovations, ensuring public spaces offer an engaging environment relevant for today’s global travelers.
      http://youtu.be/5XpnX50B4Ao
    • ITAC: A Victim’s Story
      Through Intersections’ exclusive partnership with ITAC, the Identity Theft Assistance Center, we have been able to help hundreds of companies manage breaches affecting millions of people and assist thousands more to recover from identity theft.
      http://youtu.be/WSVYnMp_70w

    Guest Services: Module Seven Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. According to the AHMA Educational Institute, employees should provide ____________.

    • a. Guest Service Silver
    • b. Excellent Guest Service
    • c. Guest Service Gold
    • d. Five Diamond Guest Service

    2. Which of the following are basic principles of guest services?

    • a. Meet and attempt to exceed expectations
    • b. Smile and be polite
    • c. Always wear your name tag
    • d. All of the above

    3. Two areas of emerging technology in guest services are?

    • a. GSM (Guest Service Measurement) and POS (Point of Sale)
    • b. Guest Service Gold and POS (Point of Sale)
    • c. GSM (Guest Service Measurement) and Guest Service Gold
    • d. R.A.V.E. and Guest Service Gold

    4. According to the Javelin Research Strategy, identity theft has increased by ________ in 2011.

    • a. 5%
    • b. 11%
    • c. 13%
    • d. 15%

    6. POS systems can decrease the likelihood of identity theft and fraud.

    • True
    • False

  • VIII. Technology

    Businesswoman

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and post-secondary education opportunities within the hotel industry.

    • (A) organize oral and written information
    • (B) compose a variety of written documents such as an agenda

    (8) The student uses information technology tools specific to hotel management to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (A) use information technology tools to manage and perform work responsibilities
    • (B) use technology tools to perform workplace tasks
    • (C) prepare complex multimedia publications
    • (D) demonstrate knowledge and use of point-of-sale systems
    • (E) evaluate Internet resources for industry information

    (2) The student uses verbal and nonverbal communication skills to create, express, and interpret information for providing a positive experience for guests and employees.

    • (A) develop, deliver, and critique presentations
    • (B) analyze various marketing strategies for a hotel or an available service

    (3) The student solves problems using critical thinking, innovation, and creativity independently and in teams.

    • (C) use principles of budgeting and forecasting to maximize profit and growth

    (1) The student gains academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and post-secondary education opportunities within the hotel industry.

    • (C) calculate correctly using numerical concepts such as percentage and reasonable estimation in practical situations

    Module Content

    A. Application software
    B. Technological advances
    C. Marketing strategies
    D. Business and accounting applications

    Module VIII Handouts

    A. Application Software
    Technology in the Hotel Management Industry has certainly come a long way from it’s inception. The industry has moved from making reservations through the local switchboard operator to online reservations made directly by the customer.

    There are several software applications in use in the Hospitality Industry and many that are specific to Hotel Management.

    There are various types of information systems; for example:

    • transaction processing systems
    • office systems
    • decision support systems
    • knowledge management systems
    • database management systems
    • office information systems

    A particular software may support working in multiple currencies and in multiple time zones, all managed centrally and seamlessly. It may be linked to Marketing and Distribution through a variety of channels for improved ROI (Return on Investment), thus directly improving the bottom line – profit.

    B. Technological Advances

    According to Hotel Business Review, there are seven top hotel technology trends to consider:

    • iPad use in POS (Point of Sale) and PMS (Property Management Systems)
    • Mobile devices/WiFi Accessibility
    • Cloud services – Cloud computing offers many benefits to hotels; not the least of which is a more cost-effective way to deploy technology without the large up front capital expenditures and the need for a lot of hardware on the premises.
    • Social media
    • Hosted PBAX (Private Automated Branch Exchange) systems for handling guest calls
    • Automated EMS (Energy Management Systems) to control HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning)
    • Automated LED (Light-emitting Diode) for energy efficiency

    C. Marketing Strategies
    The operational role of the marketing department is to manage the business of marketing for the hotel, restaurant, attractions/entertainment, conference center and transportation for the property.

    Marketing teams envelope the following areas:

    • research (guest services and product development)
    • budget
    • resources
    • advertising

    Market research asks the following questions:

    • Who are the potential guests?
    • What are their needs?
    • What are they willing to pay?
    • Who are their competitors?

    The marketing team must develop a budget that provides a high ROI (Return on Investment). The basic formula is (Gain for Investment – Cost for Investment) divided by Cost of Investment – ROI.

    An essential element includes developing a marketing plan that outlines specific actions to interest potential clients in specific goods and services, and persuades them to buy those items. The marketing strategies are derived from a marketing plan.

    Four primary strategies that the hotelier must consider are:

    • Product – match the product to the right market
    • Price – offer the product at the price guests are willing to pay
    • Place – promoting the right product at the right price in the right location
    • Promotion – promoting the right product at the right price, in the right place, in the right way; How will guests be reached? (TV, Radio, Satellite Radio, Internet, Social Media, Billboards, Flyers)

    The marketing team must also establish market segments and target markets. A market segment is where managers divide a varied market into district segments, for example, weddings and business conferences.

    When the marketing team utilizes the property to attract a specific group, such as family vacations through special promotions, this is called a target market.

    Two other marketing strategies that are used to refine these strategies are:

    • Demographics – the analysis of a variety of factors to identify and group guests into specific market segments such as:
      • age
      • gender
      • education
      • income
      • marital status
      • occupation
      • religion
      • family size

    • Psychographics – the analysis of the lifestyle choices and preferences of guests. For instance, what attracts:
      • families with young children
      • active older adults
      • retired couples
      • singles
      • business travelers

    The data is then used to create a detailed profile for each market segment.

    Direct marketing is one of the very powerful tools used to capture the various market segments identified by the research of the marketing team.

    Some examples of current trends in direct marketing involving technology are:

    • mobile messaging
    • interactive consumer websites
    • online display ads
    • e-mail
    • social media promotions

    Another key area includes, SEO (Search Engine Optimization), a tool used by website experts to use a series of words a potential client enters when searching to redirect them to specific websites.

    Marketing must also value diversity and not discriminate in any way. Ethical practices should include:

    • High moral characteristics
    • Associate product value with the product, good, or service’s price
    • Explain policy for delivery, exchange, return, repair or maintenance
    • Show copyrights, property rights such as patents, trademarks, designs, models, or trade names
    • Recognize approvals, awards, prizes, certifications, or diplomas
    • Explain benefits for charitable causes

    D. Business and Accounting Applications
    Finance varies according to the specific type of hotel operation. However, there are certain measures and methods used regardless of the operating system used. The rooms division is responsible for producing revenue from the sale of guestrooms. The front office monitors the “rack rate,” which is the highest possible rate a guest may be charged for a room.

    Larger hotels and resorts also measure profitability in the food and beverage departments, especially with conference centers offering banquet services and catering.

    The revenue center generates income for the hotel through the sale of services or products to guests.

    Revenue centers include:

    • rooms
    • food and beverage
    • sales
    • concessions rental, and commissions
    • fitness and recreation facilities

    Non-revenue areas must also be closely monitored although they do not generate direct income.

    They are called Cost Centers which includes:

    • Marketing
    • Facilities
    • Accounting
    • Human Resources
    • Security

    The system that provides checks and balances for all accounts for registered hotel guests is referred to as the “Night Audit.” The main purpose of the night audit is to verify the accuracy and completeness of guest folios and compare them against the departmental transaction reports.

    The guest folio is the guest transactions which are balanced daily by the night auditor. These are placed in the guest ledger which is a collection of all guest folio accounts. These guest folios measure the hotel’s profitability or what is known as RevPAR (revenue per available room).

    RevPAR measures how well the hotel is performing financially. The auditor uses occupancy percentage (OP) and average daily rate (ADR) to determine this.

    • ADR x OP = RevPAR

    Occupancy Percentage measures how well the hotel is attracting guests to the property.

    Rooms occupied divided by rooms available = occupancy percentage

    ADR determines the nightly average price for rooms being sold.

    • revenue divided by number of rooms sold = ADR

    The front office staff is expected to sell rooms at the full rack rate unless the guest qualifies for an authorized rate such as:

    • corporate
    • government
    • other discounted promotions

    This allows the manager to see how many rooms had to be sold in order to achieve “yield statistic.”

    • Actual rooms revenue divided by potential rooms revenue x 100 = Yield Statistic

    Hotels use a variety of computer based point of sale and property management systems to monitor and calculate their average daily revenue.

    In addition to revenues, most systems monitor:

    • purchasing
    • inventory
    • customer preferences
    • sales
    • profit and loss

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module VIII Handouts

    • Compare and Contrast Hotel Websites
    • Hotel Poster Design Certificate
    • Hotel Technology Tools Notes
    • Hotel Technology Tools Notes (Key)
    • Hotel Technology Tools Quiz
    • Hotel Technology Tools Quiz (Key)
    • Hotel Website Design Certificate
    • Hotel Website Design Challenge
    • KWL Chart – Hotel Technology
    • KWL Chart – Show Me the Money!
    • Quarter Revenue Forecast
    • Quarter Revenue Forecast (Key)
    • Quarter Revenue Forecast Instructions
    • Room Revenue Forecast
    • Room Revenue Forecast (Key)
    • Rubric for Hotel Poster Design
    • Rubric for Hotel Website Design
    • Show Me the Money! Notes
    • Show Me the Money! Notes (Key)
    • Show Me the Money! Quiz
    • Show Me the Money! Quiz (Key)
    • The Guest Cycle Exercise
    • The Guest Cycle Exercise (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    1. Point of Sale Demonstration

    • Invite a POS Technology provider to the classroom to conduct an in-class demonstration of the software.
    • Have the students research in advance various types of POS systems.
    • Assign each group an area of concern to be a “table expert” in preparing questions for the discussion.

    For example: Front Desk Operations, Food and Beverage Operations, Day Spa and Salon, Catering and Banquet Services. Each group will identify challenges in the assigned service areas (For example: identity theft)

    2. Which System is Best?

    • The student will: research two POS systems and create a contrast and comparison based on the Pros and Cons of each system, product ratings and system accuracy. * Divide students into teams of 2 to 3. * Instruct students to review the systems themselves using www.cnet.com and http://pos-systems-review.toptenreviews.com/
    • Teams will present their findings using PowerPoint™ or Prezi™.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Hospitality and Tourism Management Program. (2012). Orlando, FL: American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute/Pearson.
    • Hospitality Services, Food and Lodging. (2004). Tinely Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company, Inc.

    Websites

    YouTube™:

    Technology: Module Eight Pre-Assessment Questions:

    1. According to Hotel Business Review, all of the following are top trends EXCEPT:

    • a. Wireless devices
    • b. Cloud services
    • c. Social media
    • d. Flyers

    2. Which one of the following is NOT identified in market research?

    • a. guest preferences
    • b. potential customers
    • c. guest needs
    • d. competitors

    3. Psychographics is the analysis of the __________.

    • a. lifestyle choices and preferences of guests
    • b. demographics and preferences of guests
    • c. preferences of guests and sales
    • d. all of the above

    4. The Revenue Center generates income from which of the following?

    • a. food and beverages
    • b. rooms
    • c. sales
    • d. all of the above

    5. Hotels use computer based systems to monitor all of the following EXCEPT?

    • a. inventory
    • b. sales
    • c. customer preferences
    • d. fitness and recreation facilities

    6. Larger hotels have such large budgets that they are not really concerned about small losses from food and beverage revenue.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • Quiz

    Hotel Management Online Course

    Progress:

    1. What are the five career areas of hotel management?

    2. Time management refers to a range of:

    3. What three things must an executive be an expert at doing?

    4. What improves significantly among employees who see themselves as part of a team?

    5. A time management system is a designed combination of ___________.

    6. An entry level job provides a platform to move employees through their chosen path with a high rate of success.

    7. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, lodging management job are expected to grow by ________.

    8. The number one ranked hospitality program in the world is ___________.

    9. A resume is an advertising tool that summarizes a job applicant's ___________.

    10. Two of the most important employment documents in the employment process are?

    11. A start-up company is usually financed through _____________.

    12. Entrepreneurship is a business venture that accompanies very low-risk.

    13. Ethical standards are rules that govern a person's __________________.

    14. Which of the following is NOT considered one of the eight ethical behaviors?

    15. Which of the following IS included in establishing policies and procedures?

    16. Policies governing workers' rights laws include all BUT one of the following?

    17. Which one of the following is NOT included in the Fair Labor Standards Act?

    18. The Americans with Disabilities Act covers discrimination of persons riding public transportation as well as private amusement parks.

    19. One of the best preventive measures against spreading infectious diseases is ____________.

    20. The two of the primary agencies that provide the majority of workplace regulations are ____________.

    21. MSDS sheets provide information about handling ___________.

    22. The formal system established to monitor food safety is ______________.

    23. Managers must have at least one of the following certified employees on every shift:

    24. Failing to provide employees with goggles and mask for handling hazardous chemicals would be considered on OSHA violation.

    25. A small luxury hotel offering premium services in a fashionable location is called a ___________.

    26. Most luxury hotels in North America will typically carry a service rating of ________________.

    27. The percentage of Five Diamond hotels that are named Five Star hotels is ______________.

    28. Hotels with multiple business partners or companies are called ______________.

    29. A hotel independently owned by one person that is not part of a chain is called a ______________.

    30. All of these are established forms of communications EXCEPT:

    31. Verbal communication is ________ of what others understand when you communicate.

    32. Written communication should contain which one of the following?

    33. The Continuous Quality Improvement process uses a(n) ___________ to accomplish operational changes.

    34. Avoiding confrontations can often postpone conflicts in the workplace.

    35. According to the AHMA Educational Institute, employees should provide what kind of service?

    36. Which of the following are basic principles of guest services?

    37. Two areas of emerging technology in guest services are:

    38. According to the Javelin Research Strategy, identity theft has increased by ________ in 2011.

    39. POS systems can decrease the likelihood of identity theft and fraud.

    40. According to Hotel Business Review, all of the following are top trends EXCEPT:

    41. Which one of the following is NOT identified in market research?

    42. Psychographics is the analysis of the __________.

    43. The Revenue Center generates income from ______________.

    44. Hotels use computer based systems to monitor all of the following EXCEPT

    45. Big hotels with large budgets are not really concerned with small losses with food and beverage revenue.

    46. Hotel Management is an articulated course for one credit.

    47. Hotel Management is part of the _________________ Career Cluster.

    48. CTE stands for:

    49. There are ______________ Career Clusters.

    50. Career and Technical Education (CTE) equips students with

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