Hospitality Services Part II (TEKS 10-18) Online Course

  • Hospitality Services Part II (TEKS 10-18) Online Course Introduction

    MP900384832

    Hospitality Services provides students with the academic and technical preparation to pursue high-demand and high-skill careers in hospitality related industries.

    The knowledge and skills are acquired within a sequential, standards-based program that integrates hands-on and project-based instruction. Standards included in the Hospitality Services course are designed to prepare students for nationally recognized industry certifications, post-secondary education, and entry-level careers.

    In addition, Hospitality Services is designed so that performance standards meet employer expectations, enhancing the employability of students. Instruction may be delivered through laboratory training or through internships, mentoring, or job shadowing. Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Hospitality Services is one of 9 courses in the Hospitality and Tourism career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Articulated Credit
    This course is also available for the Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) Program (1 credit) that gives high school students a chance to receive credit at participating community colleges across Texas for taking certain enhanced technical courses during high school.

    For more information, visit:

    Important
    This online course is a continuation of the Hospitality Services Part I online course. It begins with the Food Safety and Sanitation. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Each module ends with multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to Introductory Lesson: Hospitality Services for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.

  • X. Food Safety and Sanitation

    Hands Under a Running Faucet

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry.

    (8) The student reviews the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organization performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) determine local safety and sanitation requirements

    (9) The student understands roles within teams, work units, departments, organizations, inter-organizational systems, and the larger environment.

    • (A) implement a set of operating procedures to comply with company requirements

    Module Content

    Food Safety and Sanitation is the tenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Sources of foodborne illness
    • B. Preventing foodborne illness
    • C. Government regulations
    • D. Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)

    Refer to Safety and Sanitation Guidelines – Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/safety-and-sanitation-guidelines-hospitality-services/

    Module X Handouts

    A. Sources of foodborne illness

    A contaminant is a substance in food that does not belong in food. Contaminants in food can cause illness or death. Food-borne illness is a disease that is caused by contaminated food.

    Tthree types of contaminants:

    • physical
    • chemical
    • biological

    A physical contaminant is an item that accidentally gets in the food. These are unpleasant but not necessarily dangerous.

    Examples of physical contaminants include:

    • hair
    • dirt
    • glass
    • staples
    • bandages
    • fingernails

    Chemical contaminants are chemicals that are toxic and not easily found in food.

    Types of chemical contaminants include:

    • pesticides
    • cleaning agents
    • metals in solutions

    Cleaning agents include bleach, ammonia, and polish. Metals such as copper, lead, and cadmium occur in cooking pots and utensils. It is important to make sure these metals don’t leach chemicals into food.

    Biological contaminants are responsible for most cases of foodborne illness. A biological contaminant is a microscopic living substance that accidentally gets into the food.

    Types of biological contaminants include:

    • bacteria
    • parasites
    • viruses
    • molds
    • fungi

    A biological contaminant that causes a disease is called pathogen. A microorganism is a living substance so small that you must use a microscope to see it. Not all pathogens are a kind of disease or are a biological contaminant. Many microorganisms are used to create tasty and healthful foods. Yeast is a microorganism, a type of fungus, that is used for bread.

    Three groups of pathogens are responsible for most of the foodborne illnesses.

    The three groups are:

    • bacteria
    • viruses
    • parasites

    Symptoms of foodborne illness caused by pathogens are:

    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • diarrhea
    • cramps
    • fever

    The temperature danger zone is temperatures between 40°F to 140°F. The “TDZ” is the range for which bacteria grow best. Room temperature is 70°F. That means at room temperature bacteria grows best.

    You can also transmit viruses from one person to another. Transmit means to carry from one place to another. When the food contains viruses, it can get into the human body when a person eats the food. Once the virus is in the body, it can reproduce. The virus can then make a person sick.

    A parasite is an organism that needs a host. The living thing a parasite lives in is called a host. The parasite gets its nourishment from the host. Parasites can live inside the animals that humans eat as food (poultry, cattle, pigs, and fish). They are usually passed through an animal host.

    B. Preventing Foodborne Illness

    Three main ways to prevent foodborne illness:

    • personal hygiene
    • sanitation
    • proper handling of food

    Personal hygiene consists of the action the person takes to keep his or her body and clothing clean and to remove pathogens.

    View video:
    • Put Your Hands Together
      Researchers in London estimate that if everyone routinely washed their hands, a million deaths a year could be prevented.
      www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/HandsTogether

    Sanitation consists of the actions taken to prevent and control disease. Sanitation is the process of cleaning and sanitizing.

    Cleaning is the physical act of removing dirt and food from surfaces.

    Proper food handling requires proper storage. Food that has been received must be stored properly. Once it is received it must also be properly stored to prevent contamination. The most important rule of storage is first in and first out (FIFO). When food is received, write the date on the package. In the storage areas, place new food products behind the older food products.

    Rules to remember:

    • protect food from flies, pests and rodents
    • do not store cleaning products in the same area as food
    • never store food on the floor
    • store food in original packaging
    • food should be stored 6” off the floor

    C. Government regulations

    Federal agencies have a major responsibility for food safety:

    Most states have a public health agency responsible for the regulation of food service businesses.

    Local health departments, run by a city, municipality, or county, are usually responsible for enforcing state food codes. The local health department often administers the food safety exam. They also issue restaurant permits. Local health departments are also responsible for periodically inspecting restaurants to make sure that they continue to meet the safety and sanitation requirements. Local health departments are also responsible for investigating any reported incidents of a foodborne illness.

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP)

    The hazard analysis critical control point (HACCP) is a system of assuring food safety. This system was developed by the Pillsbury Company in the 1960s for NASA. Space officials realized that an astronaut getting a foodborne illness in space could become a life-threatening situation.
    HACCP sets up critical control points to ensure the proper handling of food from the moment it enters the restaurant until it is fully prepared and served. In other words, HACCP is a way of organizing and documenting all the rules of safe food handling so that they are followed.

    The Seven HACCP Principles:

    • Principle 1: Conduct a hazard analysis.
      • Restaurants determine the food safety hazards identify the preventive measures the restaurant can apply to control these hazards.
    • Principle 2: Identify critical control points.
      • A critical control point (CCP) is a point, step, or procedure in a food process at which control can be applied and, as a result, a food safety hazard can be prevented, eliminated, or reduced to an acceptable level.
      • A food safety hazard is any biological, chemical, or physical property that may cause a food to be unsafe for human consumption.
    • Principle 3: Establish critical limits for each critical control point.
      • A critical limit is the maximum or minimum value to which a physical, biological, or chemical hazard must be controlled at a critical control point to prevent, eliminate, or reduce to an acceptable level.
    • Principle 4: Establish critical control point monitoring requirements.
      • Monitoring activities are necessary to ensure that the process is under control at each critical control point.
    • Principle 5: Establish corrective actions.
      • These are actions to be taken when monitoring indicates a deviation from an established critical limit.
      • The final rule requires a plant’s HACCP plan to identify the corrective actions to be taken if a critical limit is not met.
      • Corrective actions are intended to ensure that no product injurious to health or otherwise adulterated as a result of the deviation enters commerce.
    • Principle 6: Establish record keeping procedures.
      • The HACCP regulation requires that all restaurants maintain certain documents, including its hazard analysis and written HACCP plan, and records documenting the monitoring of critical control points, critical limits, verification activities, and the handling of processing deviations.
    • Principle 7: Establish procedures for verifying the HACCP system is working as intended.
      • Validation ensures that the plans do what they were designed to do; that is, they are successful in ensuring the production of safe product.

    Additional information on HAACP can be viewed on the following website:

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module X Handouts

    • Fire Extinguisher Use
    • Fire Extinguisher Use (Key)
    • Retail Food Establishment Inspection Report
    • Rubric for Group Safety video
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines
    • Safety and Sanitation Guidelines (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Contact your local Health Department to have them come out and speak. They will have lots of information and personal stories. Allow them to do a “mock” health inspection report. You will learn a lot.
    • Take students on a tour of the back of the house of a restaurant. Have students pay attention to issues that may be addressed in HAACP.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.
    • ServSafe® Manager. 6th. Chicago, IL: National Restaurant Association, 2012. Print.

    Websites

    • Centers for Disease Control
      Wash Your Hands
      http://www.cdc.gov/features/handwashing/
    • Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)
      The Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is the public health agency in the U.S. Department of Agriculture responsible for ensuring that the nation’s commercial supply of meat, poultry, and egg products is safe, wholesome, and correctly labeled and packaged.
      http://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/home
    • Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
      FDA regulates safety and truthful labeling of all food products including dietary supplements
      (except for livestock meat and poultry products, which are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture)
      http://www.fda.gov/Food/default.htm
    • Animal and Plant Inspection Service (APIS)
      The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is a multi-faceted Agency with a broad mission area that includes protecting and promoting U.S. agricultural health, regulating genetically engineered organisms, administering the Animal Welfare Act and carrying out wildlife damage management activities.
      http://www.aphis.usda.gov/
    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
      Mission is to protect human health and the environment.
      http://www.epa.gov/
    • HACCP Principles & Application Guidelines
      National Advisory Committee on Microbiological Criteria for Foods
      http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/HACCP/ucm2006801.htm

    Video:

    • Put Your Hands Together
      Researchers in London estimate that if everyone routinely washed their hands, a million deaths a year could be prevented.
      www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/HandsTogether

    Food Safety and Sanitation Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are the three types of contaminants?

    • a. physical, chemical, bacteria
    • b. pathogens, chemical, bacteria
    • c. pathogens, chemical, biological
    • d. physical, chemical, biological

    2. Yeast is a chemical contaminant.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. What three groups of pathogens are responsible for most of the foodborne illnesses?

    • a. bacteria, viruses, and physical contaminants
    • b. bacteria, viruses, and fungus
    • c. bacteria, viruses, and parasites
    • d. none of the above

    4. What are the main symptoms of foodborne illness caused by pathogens?

    • a. nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, and fever
    • b. nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, chills, and fainting
    • c. jaundice, vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, and fever
    • d. jaundice, vomiting, diarrhea, chills, and fainting

    5. What are three main ways to prevent foodborne illness?

    • a. personal hygiene, sanitation, and proper handling of food
    • b. personal hygiene, storage, and proper handling of food
    • c. personal hygiene, storage, and washing hands
    • d. personal hygiene, sanitation, and washing hands

    6. What is the temperature danger zone?

    • a. 40°F to 170°F
    • b. 50°F to 140°F.
    • c. 50°F to 170°F
    • d. 40°F to 140°F

    7. Who is responsible for protecting and promoting public health through supervision of food safety?

    • a. APIS
    • b. EPA
    • c. FDA
    • d. FSIS

  • XI. Security

    hotel key

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary education opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry

    (8) The student reviews the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organization performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) determine local safety and sanitation requirements
    • (B) determine solutions to emergency situations
    • (C) explain how key control procedures protect guests and minimize risks
    • (D) explain how cash control procedures are used to protect funds
    • (E) explain how guests and property are protected to minimize losses or liabilities
    • (F) outline safety and security issues for individuals and groups in multiple environments to minimize risks
    • (G) recognize potential, real, and perceived natural, social, or terrorism emergency situations in order to respond appropriately
    • (J) determine sources of assistance to use in emergency situations, including self, coworkers, customers, and guests
    • (K) examine safety and security information relevant to the venue

    Module Content

    Security is the eleventh unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the five TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Guest security
    • B. Structural security
    • C. Employee security
    • D. Role of employees
    • E. Prevention of monetary loss

    A. Guest security

    The main responsibility of the security department is the protection of people. The security department is responsible for the safety of all people at the hotel, including guests and employees.

    Guests expect to be safe in:

    • public areas
    • parking lots
    • rooms

    Employees expect to be safe when on duty late at night and when walking to their car.

    The security department is responsible for the protection of the guest property and the hotel property. Guests should feel comfortable about leaving their bags in their guest room and in their cars in the parking lot. Security must also protect the business from theft.

    Employees and guests are sometimes a threat to security.

    Guests sometimes steal:

    • hotel property
      • towels
      • blankets

    Housekeeping is usually first to notice.

    Employees sometimes steal:

    • money
    • supplies
    • hotel properties
    • guest property

    Special procedures help to deter this type of crime. Security works with department managers to stop this type of crime or to catch the criminal.

    Guests need to feel safe in their rooms. For this reason, most guestrooms are equipped with one or more locks. Guests need a secure place to keep valuables when they are not in their rooms. Most lodging properties provide safe deposit boxes or an in-room safe.

    Locks on guestroom doors keep out intruders while guests are in the room. Guest rooms can be locked from inside the guest room. Another good security feature is a privacy latch on the guest room door. The door can only be opened about two inches with this latch in place. This type of a lock is convenient for receiving supplies from housekeeping without opening the door completely. Most guest rooms have a peephole which is important for checking outside the room without having to open the door.

    B. Structural security

    The buildings of the business must have features that provide security. Structural security consists of the security features that are built into a building. Structural security should be built into the hotel, guest rooms, and any other buildings that are part of the property. Modern technology provides many features that increase security.

    Many security features can be built into a lodging property.

    Examples include:

    • lights
    • locks
    • alarms
    • lockers for staff

    New technology also provides many security features that can help maintain security.

    Examples include:

    • security system
    • electronic system
    • telecommunication
    • video cameras
    • TV system
    • smoke, fire, and flood detection systems

    Good lighting is important for both guests and employee security. This lighting is important in brightly lit parking lots where criminals might hide, to well lit walkways which make us feel more secure. Some lights need to be left on all night inside the building. Fire exits must also be clearly marked.

    The entire property must have working and effective fire alarms that are connected to the local fire department. It is also important to have a burglar alarm system. All of these systems are important for security.

    Most lodging properties use electronic key systems. Electronic key systems can be quickly and easily changed.

    In an electronic key system, the front desk agent change the lock and key in a few minutes. Any lost or stolen key can be quickly made useless.

    Video cameras are often used to videotape areas were crimes might occur.

    The camera focuses on a specific area where crimes might occur such as:

    • where cash is handled
    • the parking lot
    • entrances
    • stairways

    The tapes can also be watched later to find suspects and document in cases of a crime being committed.

    C. Employee security

    Employees must follow security policies to ensure security. Security policies are sometimes called security procedures.

    Security procedures include:

    • rules concerning the employee ID card
    • key control
    • limiting entrances
    • lost and found
    • special procedures

    Many hospitality businesses require employees to wear a photo ID. The employee ID has a photograph that identifies that the wearer works for the business. Employee ID cards are usually used by airlines and hotels.

    A good control key control system is a major factor in keeping a property secure. A good key control system knows where all hotel keys are located at all times and who has each key. When the location is known, it is easier to discover when a key has been lost or stolen.

    Security can be maintained by all employees when they take responsibility for keys that are issued. Keys can be turned in at the end of each shift. An electronic key system control can control worker access and open only the rooms which they need access to.

    Employee theft can be a problem.

    Employees often steal:

    • linens
    • guestroom supplies
    • silverware
    • food

    One way to prevent employee theft is to store these items properly and keep an accurate inventory of supplies. Supplies should be kept in a locked storeroom. Only authorized employees can have access to keys. A requisition system should be used when items are needed. Accurate inventories should be taken to discover when items are missing.

    D. Role of employees

    Employees have specific security responsibilities related to their specific jobs.

    All employees are responsible for:

    • noticing and reporting problems or danger
    • accidents and hazards
    • reporting strange people
    • taking possibility for keys

    Employees are also responsible for knowing the security and safety procedures of the places where they work.

    All employees should be alert to accidents and potentially dangerous physical conditions. Employees need to know how to handle these situations. In most places, the first step is to report the situation to your manager or supervisor. The manager or supervisor reports the potential problem to security. The security team will decide what steps need to happen next.

    There are many people who may have unusual behavior and some are not necessarily dangerous. Some are. All employees need to know what to do if someone is acting in a strange way.

    Behaviors to notice:

    • someone who is looking at them in the windows and doors
    • someone who tries the same key in several doors
    • someone trying to get into a room without a key
    • someone that changes direction whenever another person approaches
    • someone that sits in their car for a long time or drives around and around the property

    If the situation permits, ask the person if he or she needs help. You must always be polite and respectful. The person you suspect just may be lost, confused, or ill. If the person doesn’t answer, runs away, or gives a strange answer, contact security. Watch the person, without being noticed, until the security officer arrives.

    E. Prevention of monetary loss

    Most losses occur in three categories:

    • internal theft
    • external theft
    • through errors

    • Internal (Employee) Theft is the largest contributor to loss for most retailers, regardless of size or segment
      • can be from:
        • simple merchandise theft
        • collusion with friends or other store employees
        • inventory losses by employees
    • External Theft is often caused by:
      • shoplifting
      • break-ins
      • robberies
      • other acts by outside sources
    • Controlling external theft requires a commitment to educating your employees on good customer service, awareness to the signs of a potential loss and how to best protect the store and inventory against external loss
    • Errors
      • Often considered paperwork errors, these mistakes can contribute upwards of over 15%-20% of a retailer’s annual loss

    Simple mistakes caused over and over again have resulted in thousands of dollars lost to a single retail establishment.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Ask students if they have stayed at hotels with electronic room keys. Are the room numbers displayed?
      Why not? If possible, display an assortment of hotel room keys. Many now have advertisements from local businesses.
    • Emphasize ethics in the workplace. Employee theft of guest property, money, and supplies is on the rise and employees will be fired.
    • Have students research the security that large companies such as Disney uses. Students can make a PowerPoint™ or Prezi™ to present their findings.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Security Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The main responsibility of the security department of a hotel is the protection of employees.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    2. Employees can be a threat to security of a hotel because of theft of such items as towels and blankets.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. What new technology provides many security features that can help maintain security?

    • a. security system and electronic system
    • b. telecommunication and video cameras
    • c. none of the above
    • d. all of the above

    4. Why is good lighting important for both guests and employee security?

    • a. It is important for ambiance of the property.
    • b. It sets a good impression to the guest.
    • c. Good lighting is not important.
    • d. It is important for physical safety of all people on the property.

    5. Why is a good key control system needed?

    • a. It regulates who has keys and their property access.
    • b. A hotel does not need a good control key control system.
    • c. A key control system is an outdated concept.
    • d. Keys are important to a business and a good one is helpful.

    6. What is the first step an employee should take if they discover a dangerous situation?

    • a. Ignore it. It will resolve itself.
    • b. Call 911.
    • c. Report it to a manager.
    • d. Take care of it without help.

    7. Which of these three categories of monetary loss is the largest?

    • a. Internal
    • b. External
    • c. Errors
    • d. All of the above

  • XII. Safety and Emergency Procedures

    inspection

    TEKS Addressed

    (8) The student reviews the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organization performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (A) determine local safety and sanitation requirements
    • (B) determine solutions to emergency situations
    • (F) outline safety and security issues for individuals and groups in multiple environments to minimize risks
    • (G) recognize potential, real, and perceived natural, social, or terrorism emergency situations in order to respond appropriately
    • (J) determine sources of assistance to use in emergency situations, including self, coworkers, customers, and guests
    • (K) examine safety and security information relevant to the venue

    Module Content

    Safety and Emergency Procedures is the twelfth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Safety regulations
    • B. Accident prevention
    • C. Emergency planning
    • D. Types of emergencies

    Module XII Handouts

    A. Safety Regulations

    Safety consists of actions taken to prevent accidents and emergencies.

    Each business must have safety procedures in order to protect employee guests, and the business itself.

    p(tight) Safety procedures include all actions taken to ensure:

    • food safety and sanitation
    • security
    • the safe operation of equipment

    Food safety and sanitation was discussed in module X and Security in module XI.

    The federal, state, and local governments have passed laws and regulations to make sure that all businesses follow a minimum of safety and health procedures.

    Occupational Health and Safety
    Passed in 1970, the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSH Act) requires employers to make the workplace free of hazards that may cause injury or death to employees.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is responsible for making sure that the laws and regulations of the OSH Act are followed.

    The major responsibilities of OSHA are:

    • to develop mandatory job safety and health standards
    • to enforce those standards through inspections

    The employer must make sure that each employee knows his or her rights under the OSH Act and must post the It’s the Law OSHA Poster in a prominent place.

    Safety regulations are determined by the business itself.

    Safety regulations are:

    • designed to create standards of safety for all employees
    • based upon best practices
    • designed to differentiate between reasonable and unreasonable behaviors that relate to safety and security

    Regulations protect both the employee and the business.

    • The business is protected:
      • if an employee is injured or adversely affected by something safety-related
    • Employees are protected:
      • by receiving training on safety matters
      • becoming aware of potential hazards

    Building Codes

    Building safety codes are enforced during:

    • construction
    • remodeling
    • operation of the business

    Failure to correct building safety violations can result in:

    • fines
    • loss of certificate of occupancy
    • jail sentences

    A certificate of occupancy is issued by the city or county building inspector after they approve the building for business.

    • Health Inspections
      Health inspections are regularly conducted by the local health department. These inspections include the kitchen, storage, bar, and restaurant areas. Inspectors look for compliance with sanitation standards, absence of pests, proper care and handling of food, proper food storage techniques, and correct temperature of wash water. A health inspection certificate is usually issued after each health inspection.
    • Liquor License
      Hospitality businesses that sell alcoholic beverages to the public must have a liquor license. The liquor license is granted by the state. Businesses that have a liquor license are required to have safety lessons on procedures for selling and serving alcoholic beverages.

    B. Accident Prevention

    Prevention focuses upon stopping unsafe conditions before they occur.

    Accident prevention includes:

    • deterrence is a strong factor in prevention
    • most common minor accidents are cuts, falls and burns
    • most common major emergency is fire
    • safety training and awareness

    Providing safe working conditions is key in prevention. Businesses are held liable if they create an unsafe work environment and fail to take reasonable measures to prevent hazards.

    C. Emergency planning

    • Emergency planning involves assessing all possible risks to the work environment, and developing plans to deal with those risks.
    • Some emergencies are present everywhere, such as fires and potential criminal acts.
    • Performing fire drills and having emergency plans in place for the emergencies are key in dealing with an emergency situation.

    D. Types of emergencies

    A minor emergency is one that does not require the help of an expert. Minor emergencies are common in the hospitality industry. Examples include

    • small fires
    • minor injuries such as small cuts, scrapes, and minor burns

    A major emergency is an emergency that requires professional help or is life-threatening. The first thing to do in emergencies to assess the situation. What is the problem? What is going on? Then follow the instructions in your emergency manual.
    Check out www.osha.gov for more about how to protect employee health and safety in the workplace.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module XII Handouts

    • It’s the Law OSHA Poster

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students create minor injury safety posters.
    • Have students research a popular resort. They will need to imagine that there is a weather emergency. Have them come up with a plan on how to respond to it.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    • Occupational Safety and Health Administration
      Assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.
      www.osha.gov

    Safety and Emergency Procedures Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are the three areas in which state and local governments make safety regulations?

    • a. Building codes, human inspections, liquor licenses
    • b. Bartending codes, health inspections, liquor licenses
    • c. Building codes, health inspections, liquor licenses
    • d. Bartending codes, human inspections, liquor licenses

    2. Deterrence is a strong factor in prevention.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. What are the most common minor accidents in the commercial kitchen?

    • a. cuts, falls, burns
    • b. cuts, fires, burns
    • c. chemical burns, fires, falls
    • d. none of the above

    4. The most common major emergency is falls.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. What government department is in charge of OSHA?

    • a. Department of Justice
    • b. Department of Labor
    • c. Department of Safety
    • d. Department of Health

    6. Workers may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that their employer is not following OSHA standards or that there are serious hazards.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    7. What type of workers are not covered by OSHA?

    • a. Private sector
    • b. State and Government workers
    • c. Federal Government workers
    • d. Self-employed

  • XIII. Engineering

    Garden

    TEKS Addressed

    (8) The student reviews the importance of health, safety, and environmental management systems in organizations and their importance to organization performance and regulatory compliance.

    • (H) examine equipment safety, functionality, and durability to protect guests and minimize replacement costs
    • (I) evaluate methods for equipment maintenance and repair to minimize down time

    Module Content

    Engineering is the thirteenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Functions of engineering
    • B. Building and equipment
    • C. Grounds maintenance

    A. Functions of Engineering

    The purpose of engineering in hospitality to to keep the facility in top condition for safety, guest satisfaction, and profitability.

    Engineering has six functions:

    • preventive maintenance
    • deep cleaning
    • repairs
    • remodeling
    • resource management
    • emergencies

    Preventive maintenance
    Consists of cleaning and repair of equipment that is in working order.

    Preventive maintenance in a hotel or restaurant is preformed on all equipment, such as:

    • boilers
    • washing machines
    • stoves
    • refrigerators

    Preventive maintenance on equipment includes:

    • replacing filters
    • adding lubrication to moving parts
    • replacing parts that show wear

    The building windows, doors, and roofs and also require maintenance.

    Deep cleaning
    A more thorough cleaning that involves extra time and is usually done every three months to guest rooms and in public areas.

    Deep cleaning tasks include:

    • flipping mattresses over
    • cleaning under and behind furniture
    • steam cleaning furniture
    • cleaning walls and carpet

    Repairs
    Must be made when something in a hotel or restaurant breaks down.

    Repairs include:

    • leaking faucets
    • broken washing machines
    • air conditioning that does not work

    Remodeling
    Done to enhance the look of the property. After several years, facilities begin to look old.

    Remodeling examples include:

    • repainting
    • changing plumbing and lighting fixtures
    • replacing carpet

    Remodeling can completely changes the look of the business.

    Resource management
    Hospitality managers are responsible for promoting the efficient use of fuel, electricity, and water. The engineering department is responsible for implementing methods of conservation.

    Emergencies
    The engineering department is usually in charge of all safety issues, including fire safety and maintenance of fire safety alarms.

    The engineering staff knows:

    • the location of all firefighting and emergency equipment in the hotel
    • the location of all equipment that could possibly explode or experience other emergencies
    • the safe exit and emergency routes

    The engineering staff works closely with:

    • the security staff
    • front of the house staff
    • municipal emergency services during an emergency

    View video from the Westin Seattle Hotel

    • Dan from The Westin Seattle Hotel
      A member of the Engineering team for almost three decades, Dan credits his experience at The Westin Seattle for having an important and enduring impact on his personal development.
      http://youtu.be/I9E4g2iwWMU

    B. Building and Equipment

    Most restaurants and hotels are located in a buildings. Engineering is concerned with the integrity of the building.

    Engineering checks for:

    • holes
    • tears
    • leaks in the walls, floors, and parking lots

    Any damage must be repaired. Most restaurants and hotels contain a variety of equipment. Engineering is concerned with keeping all equipment, large and small, in good working order.

    Engineering provides building preventive maintenance for:

    • roofs
    • walls
    • floors
    • parking lots
    • elevators
    • escalators
    • kitchen equipment
    • laundry equipment

    The basic building structure must be kept in good repair, both for safety and for attractiveness.

    Repairs that are needed can include such things as:

    • fixing holes in walls
    • mending carpet
    • repairing or replacing loose tile
    • touch up painting

    Parking lots must be maintained for two basic reasons

    • The parking lot is often the initial thing that guests see when they come to the property
    • If the parking lot is poorly maintained, it can be a safety hazard to guests and employees.

    People can fall and become injured if the parking lot has holes or uneven surfaces.

    Elevators and escalators are the main way a guest can get to their rooms and public areas of the hotel. The maintenance schedule of elevators are carefully regulated by local authorities. Elevator equipment is inspected regularly for safety. The certificate of inspection must be on display inside the elevator.

    Kitchen equipment must operate efficiently and correctly so that meals can be prepared as planned. In a hotel, engineering staff must be able to do most of the kitchen equipment repairs. Sometimes, a restaurant may use a maintenance contract for a restaurant equipment repair company to make repairs as needed.

    C. Grounds Maintenance

    The grounds of the hotel refers to the outside area of the building and most restaurants and hotels have at least a little bit of grass. Most businesses have some landscaping, which is the process of making a building and grounds look appealing.

    Many hotels have large grounds that include:

    • trees
    • flowers
    • shrubs

    Most hotels have one or more groundskeepers on the engineering staff and some may even have a separate ground keeping department.

    The grounds keeper must have knowledge of:

    • plants
    • pesticides
    • landscaping
    • insects

    Grounds keeping work also includes:

    • landscaping
    • watering
    • weed control
    • mowing
    • trimming
    • fertilizing
    • trash removal

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Work with an engineer or the engineering department of your school or a local hotel. Have students create a questionnaire as a class or individually to use in an interview about hotel engineering.
    • Assign students different functions of the engineering department for them to create a Glogster presentation for the class using http://edu.glogster.com.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    YouTube™:

    • Dan from The Westin Seattle Hotel
      A member of the Engineering team for almost three decades, Dan credits his experience at The Westin Seattle for having an important and enduring impact on his personal development.
      http://youtu.be/I9E4g2iwWMU

    Engineering Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are three of the six functions of engineering?

    • a. deep cleaning, repairs, and remodeling
    • b. resource management, emergencies, and pet daycare
    • c. deep cleaning, repairs, and office equipment repair
    • d. deep cleaning, emergencies, and office equipment repair

    2. Preventive maintenance on equipment includes replacing filters, adding lubrication to moving parts, and replacing parts that show wear.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. How often is deep cleaning usually done to guest rooms and in public areas?

    • a. 3 months
    • b. 6 months
    • c. 9 months
    • d. 1 year

    4. Hospitality managers are responsible for promoting the efficient use of fuel, electricity, and water. The engineering department is responsible for implementing methods of conservation.

    • a. True
    • b. False
    • c. Engineering and Maintenance departments work together on this

    5. What responsibilities does the engineering department have for the building and equipment?

    • a. Parking lot, kitchen equipment, building structure, laundry
    • b. Parking lot, office equipment, building structure, elevator
    • c. Parking lot, kitchen equipment, building structure, office furniture
    • d. Parking lot, kitchen equipment, building structure, elevator

    6. The grounds of the hotel refers to all inside areas of the building.

    • a. True
    • b. False, it refers to the outside of the building.
    • c. False, it refers to both the inside and outside.

    7. What does grounds keeping work include?

    • a. landscaping, watering, and weed control
    • b. mowing, trimming, and fertilizing
    • c. landscaping, watering and trash removal
    • d. all of the above are true

  • XIV. Law and Ethics

    Gavel and Law Books

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary educational opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry

    (4) The student examines and reviews ethical and legal responsibilities related to guests, employees, and conduct within the establishment to maintain high industry standards.

    • (D) analyze ethical considerations

    Module Content

    Law and Ethics is the fourteenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the four TEA units of study that include:

    Module Content

    • A. Laws and regulations
    • B. Licenses and inspections
    • C. Liability issues
    • D. Ethical issues

    Refer to What Would You Do? Ethics in Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-would-you-do-ethics-in-hospitality-services/

    Module XIV Handouts

    A. Laws and regulations

    Laws are a society’s rules of proper behavior. A society makes laws through local, state, and federal governments. Society often makes laws when businesses have not been doing what society thinks is right.

    The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 was passed to require employers to protect the safety and health of workers.

    Regulations are specific rules that are developed based on a law. Some laws include the establishment of a government agency. A government agency is the department of government that is responsible for enforcing the law. One of the first things an agency does is make regulations. The Occupational Safety and Health Act established the basic rules for occupational safety and health.

    Federal agencies that affect the hospitality industry include:

    • OSHA – Occupational Safety and Health Administration
      • can conduct workplace inspections at any time without prior notification
    • FDA – Food and Drug Administration
      • regulates the production, packaging, and labeling of foods, drugs, and cosmetics
    • USDA – United States Department of Agriculture
      • inspects meat and meat products, dairy farms, and other food producers
    • EEOC – Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
      • requires employers to treat everyone equally during the hiring process
    • EPA – Environmental Protection Agency
      • protects human health and safeguards the environment

    Many of the policies and procedures used by the hospitality businesses are based on local, state, and federal laws and regulations. Understanding these laws will help employees understand their workplace.

    Laws affecting hospitality include:

    • hiring and employment laws
    • worker safety laws
    • food safety laws
    • building and zoning laws
    • environmental protection
    • smoking ordinances
    • liquor laws

    B. Licenses and inspections

    Licensing and inspections are very important for local, state, and federal governments to enforce. A license is a document that gives the holder permission to do something.

    State and local governments often regulate hospitality businesses through licenses. The most common is the liquor license. Businesses that serve alcohol must have a license to sell alcohol. Without this license, it is illegal and the owner of the business will be fined.

    TABC – Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission – the state agency that regulates all phases of the alcoholic beverage industry in Texas.

    Duties of the commission include:

    • regulating sales
    • taxation
    • importation
    • manufacturing
    • transporting
    • advertising of alcoholic beverages

    A permit is a very similar to a license. It is the written permission to do something. Companies must have a building permit to build a new hotel or restaurant and are usually required for remodeling and renovation.

    An inspection is a formal visit for the purpose of making sure the regulations are being followed. Several federal, state and local government agencies inspect hospitality businesses to make sure the regulations are being followed or a fine or other penalties can be imposed.

    For a restaurant, the local health department makes sure that they are following health and safety regulations. Restaurants are inspected on a 100-point rating scale. If the restaurant fails, the health department can close the restaurant until they have successfully proved the regulations have been met. In some cases, the restaurant may be permanently closed.

    C. Liability issues

    As a hotel guest, you have certain rights for:

    • courteous treatment
    • no abusive or insulting treatment by employees
    • total use of a hotel room, with the innkeepers right to enter and clean the room
    • the right to be protected from personal-injury

    Hospitality businesses have special liability obligations to their guests. Liability is a responsibility to pay for damages or loss.

    Liability issues include:

    • guest injury
    • property damage or theft
    • guest privacy

    Most hospitality businesses work hard to prevent injuries to guests.

    Most injury claims result from guest injuries in:

    • lobbies
    • hallways
    • guest rooms
    • bathrooms

    Other injuries result from consumption of food and beverage or the use of a product or service sold by the hotel.

    The general rule in the hospitality business is that a hotel is liable for any loss that happens to their guests. They are liable unless it is an act caused by God, war, or if it was the fault of the guest. Signs posting the hotels’ liability are usually posted at the front desk, the elevator doors, and other easy to see locations.

    Hotels purchase insurance policies to protect against a variety of risks.

    Insurance policies include:

    • property insurance
    • liability insurance
    • private insurance

    Guests expect that their stay in a hotel will be private. No one should be allowed into the guestroom who does not have a key. Guests room numbers are not given to callers that inquire, instead, the operator connects the caller to the hotel room. The guest can then decide whether or not to give the room location to the caller. The cost can be great if a hotel invades the privacy of a guest.

    View video:

    • Front Desk First Impressions
      American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers). A scenario out of our award winning Front Desk First Impressions video. http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg

    D. Ethical issues

    Ethics can be defined as a system of moral rules that help people decide right from wrong. The goal of ethics is ethical behavior. Ethical behavior means doing the right thing, even when under pressure to do the wrong thing.

    Unethical behavior is doing the wrong thing. Unethical behavior is often illegal.

    In business, there is only one set of ethics that all must adopt.

    The hospitality quality professional code of ethics:

    • provide services with objectivity and respect for the unique needs and values of individuals.
    • avoid discrimination against other individuals on the basis of race, creed, religion, sex, age, and national origin.
    • fulfills professional commitments in good faith.
    • conduct himself/herself with honesty, integrity, fairness.
    • remains free of conflict of interest while fulfilling the objectives and maintaining the integrity of the service profession.
    • maintains confidentiality of information.
    • assumes responsibility and accountability for personal competition.
    • makes all reasonable effort to avoid bias in any kind of professional evaluation.
    • voluntarily withdraws from any substance abuse that could affect his or her or her organization.
    • accept the obligation to protect society and represent the professional management by upholding these principles.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Note: There are many handouts too numerous and large to include in this section. Refer to the following lessons for handouts, graphic organizers, and more.

    Refer to What Would You Do? Ethics in Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/what-would-you-do-ethics-in-hospitality-services/

    Module XIV Handouts

    Handouts not included in lesson:

    • Equal Opportunity is THE LAW Poster

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students research a hospitality business looking for a situation in which a regulation was broken. For example, a restaurant that was shut down by a health department. Students should write a one page summary about what happened and how it was resolved.
    • Have students create a hospitality business. They will need to write up a contract of the ideal laws employees must follow at their new company.
    • Students can create their own code of ethics for the classroom. Allow them to brainstorm positive ethical behavior and set rules for themselves.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    • Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
      Mission is to protect human health and the environment.
      www.epa.gov
    • Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
      Responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.
      www.eeoc.gov
    • Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
      Protecting and Promoting Your Heatlh
      www.fda.gov
    • Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC)
      Regulates all phases of the alcoholic beverage industry in Texas
      http://www.tabc.state.tx.us/
    • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
      Assists rural communities in conservation, food and nutrition, marketing and trade, and education and research
      http://usda.gov/wps/portal/usda/usdahome

    YouTube™:

    • Front Desk First Impressions
      American Hotel and Lodging Educational Institute
      The 25 greatest unprofessional Front Desk sins committed by hotel Front Desk associate (as compiled from a survey of front office managers). A scenario out of our award winning Front Desk First Impressions video. http://youtu.be/s3aR3yP4aKg

    Laws and Ethics Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. This government agency’s main responsibilities are to inspect the manufacturing and the processing of fresh meat and meat products.

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EPA
    • d. EEOC

    2. This government agency regulates the production, packaging, and labeling of food, drugs, and cosmetics.

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EPA
    • d. OSHA

    3. These officials can conduct workplace inspections at any time without prior notification. They also can enforce the law.

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EPA
    • d. OSHA

    4. This government agency is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EEOC
    • d. OSHA

    5. This government agency was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress.

    • a. FDA
    • b. USDA
    • c. EPA
    • d. OSHA

    6. Guests have the right to no abusive or insulting treatment by employees

    • a. True
    • b. False

    7. Unethical behavior is illegal.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • XV. Career Development and Employability Skills

    business team

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary educational opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry
    • (B) explain the effects that supply and demand have on the hospitality industry

    (3) The student researches career opportunities and qualifications to broaden awareness of careers available in the hospitality industry.

    • (A) outline a plan for an effective job search
    • (B) demonstrate flexibility to learn new knowledge and skills
    • (C) manage work responsibilities and life responsibilities
    • (D) update a personal career portfolio
    • (E) evaluate personal skills that may determine individual potential for growth within the hospitality industry
    • (F) explain what is needed to achieve job advancement
    • (G) understand the role of professional organizations or industry associations
    • (H) examine the procedures in maintaining licensure, certification, or credentials for a chosen occupation
    • (J) analyze future employment outlooks
    • (K) demonstrate appropriate business and personal etiquette

    Module Content

    Career Development and Employablity is the fifteenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the ten TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Advantages of the hospitality industry
    • B. Challenges of the hospitality industry
    • C. Hospitality careers
    • D. Preparing for a hospitality career
    • E. Personal inventory
    • F. Balancing multiple roles
    • G. Job search skills
    • H. On-the-job skills
    • I. Advancement skills
    • J. Professional organizations


    Refer to Careers in Hospitality Services for lesson ideas.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/careers-in-hospitality-services/

    Refer to lesson Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills for additional activities, ideas and resources.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/get-that-job-resumes-portfolios-and-interview-skills-3/

    Module XV Handouts

    A. Advantages of the hospitality industry

    Advantages of a career in the hospitality include:

    • abundance of jobs
    • many opportunities for advancement
    • pleasant workplace
    • fast-paced and variety
    • meeting people
    • travel

    These advantages include:

    • Abundance of jobs – range from corporate positions to desk agent
    • Advancement opportunities – depends on willingness to learn and work hard
    • Pleasant workplace – conditions are pleasant and possible travel to exotic places
    • Fast pace and variety – provides opportunity to move around, perform physical work, and work outside
    • Meeting people – major advantage to meet famous and important people
    • Travel – opportunity to travel

    B. Challenges of the hospitality industry

    The industry provides services to travelers who need assistance 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Employees must be available “round-the-clock.” Unusual hours allow the employee to have a flexible schedule and the industry gives the ability to relocate which can be exciting.

    Challenges of the hospitality industry:

    • hours of work
    • stress
    • working conditions
    • relocation

    These challenges include:

    • Hours of work – managers may work six days a week, 60 hour per week, nights, weekends, holidays
    • Stress – there are many tasks to do and not enough time to do them
    • Working conditions – may be poor if business does not practice property sanitary procedures but most have good working conditions
    • Relocation – advancement may require moving to a new place often

    C. Hospitality careers

    The hospitality industry has four segments.

    These segment include:

    • food and beverage
      • Olive Garden, McDonalds, school cafeteria
    • lodging
      • Hilton Hotels, Motel 6, KOA campgrounds
    • recreation
      • Six Flags, Disney World Resort, Grand Canyon National Park, Ski Areas
    • travel and tourism
      • Hertz rental cars, Carnival Cruise Lines, Southwest Airlines, Adventure Travel

    To learn more about hospitality occupations visit:

    D. Preparing for a hospitality career

    The hospitality industry has a wide variety of career opportunities.

    Steps to take to find out if hospitality is for you include:

    • learn about the industry and careers available
    • learn about preparation requirements
    • learn about yourself
    • make a career plan

    Ways to find out if a career in the industry is for you is to talk to employee of the industry.

    • Information interview
      • develop a list of questions that you want to find out about
      • call a local restaurant or hotel and ask to interview the manager
    • Job shadowing
      • follow another person while they do their job
    • Part-time, Summer, and Practicum job
      • best way to learn about the industry is to actually work in it
      • secure a job at a place you would like to work at through the school or contacts
    • Company research
      • explore the company website to find out more about career opportunities
    • Occupational Outlook
      The US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics compiles a great deal of information on occupations, industries, and jobs in the United States. One of the most useful documents is the Occupational Outlook handbook.
    • Association and Journals
      • can provide continuing education and networking opportunities
      • major associations include:
        • National Restaurant Association
        • American Hotel and Lodging Association

    E. Personal inventory

    In order to understand what kind of career you would like, you need to know what kind of work you would like to do. You need to know your aptitudes, abilities, and personal traits. You also need to know your values, interests, and preferences.

    Hospitality jobs based on people, things, or data focus include:

    • People
      • Bell attendants, concierge, door attendants, front desk agents, host/hostess, security officer, servers
    • Things
      • Audiovisual staff, banquet set up staff, bussers, cooks, electricians, laundry attendance, plumbers, room attendants
    • Data
      • Accounting clerks, inventory workers, night auditors, purchasers

    The first step in knowing yourself is to know your interests, aptitudes, abilities, and values. The second step is to match your interests, aptitudes, abilities, and values to career that uses your interests, aptitudes, abilities and supports your values. The third is to make a career plan.

    As a person interested in working in this industry you must decide in which of these categories you would be most happy.

    F. Balancing multiple roles

    Each person has many roles in life. A role is a set of responsibilities and expectations that go with certain aspects of your life. One of the challenges of life is about the many roles you may have. Often, the demands of different roles compete for your limited amount of time.

    Balancing roles include:

    • The role of employee will require you to be at work at specific times and perform your job well
    • Other roles you will add as you grow are citizen, spouse, parent, and community member
    • These roles have responsibilities for organizing and participating in them

    One of the benefits of the hospitality career, is that many of the jobs offer flexible and/or part-time work hours.

    G. Job search skills

    The first step in a job search is knowing your career goals and deciding what kind of job you want. Having good job skills is the key to success. Most people will search for a job several times before they find their career. Searching for a career will require excellent communication skills.

    Three key job search skills are:

    • how to find job leads
      • the most popular place to look is at the want ads or to check the Internet
    • how to fill out an application
      • make sure to have a great résumé and several references
    • how to behave at an interview
      • introduce yourself, shake hands, respond to questioning, ask questions

    H. On-the-job skills

    Once accepting a new job, the challenge is to keep it.

    These skill areas include:

    • grooming
      • appearance is the first thing most people see when they enter the business
      • each job has specific clothing and shoes, make sure to check with your manager about what those requirements are
      • personal hygiene is extremely important to make sure your clothes and body are clean
    • attitude
      • attitude is visual
      • make sure you’re friendly and have a positive attitude
      • you need self-motivation which is the urge to achieve your goals
      • teamwork is essential to the job
      • adaptability is the ability to make changes to new situations
    • work habits
      • basic, routine actions that you carry out every day
      • help you become efficient and productive
    • business etiquette
      • proper behavior and social situations
      • examples are confident handshake, introducing people correctly, wearing the appropriate clothes
    • health
      • good health is the foundation for everything in life
      • good rules to follow:
      • get adequate sleep
      • exercise regularly
      • eat a balanced diet
      • avoid health risks
      • maintain mental health

    I. Advancement skills

    Many people find a job in hospitality and are very happy. Others want to advance in their career.

    If you want to advance your career, you must take active steps.

    Active steps for advancement include:

    • continuing education
    • developing leadership skills
    • being active in professional organizations
    • changing jobs

    J. Professional organizations

    Involvement in a professional organization is one of the main ways to keep up-to-date in your profession.

    Professional associations usually have:

    • magazines
    • newsletters
    • websites

    Many associations have monthly meetings where you can meet people and find out about jobs and they may offer classes, seminars, and certificate programs.

    Professional associations and career and technical student organizations often have or offer many opportunities to develop leadership skills.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Module XV Handouts

    • 101 Interview Questions
    • Basic Information for Writing a Résumé (half sheet)
    • Are You a Teen Worker
    • Career Portfolio Sections
    • Career Portfolio Sections (Key)
    • Education and Training in Hospitality Services
    • Employment Application
    • Form I-9 Updated
    • Form W-4 (2013)
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes
    • Get That Job! Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Notes (Key)
    • Hospitality Careers O*Net Flashcards
    • Hospitality Services Writing Prompts
    • Job Advancement Opportunities in Hospitality Services
    • Job Advancement Opportunities in Hospitality Services (Key)
    • My Employability Skills Checklist
    • Recreation Worker (PDF and Excel)
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz
    • Résumés, Portfolios and Interview Skills Quiz (Key)
    • Rubric for Career Portfolio
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Rubric for Electronic Glogster™ EDU Career Poster
    • Sample Career Portfolio
    • Sample Résumé Template
    • Service Learning Log
    • Work and Life Responsibilities
    • Work and Life Responsibilities (Key)

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson

    • Have students create a resume. Bring in managers and owners of various businesses to “interview” them.
    • Have students job shadow a hospitality professional. The student must create a questionnaire for the professional that they will shadow before the job shadow and write a one-page essay on what they learned after the job shadow using the questionnaire as well as the experience.
    • Have students write an imaginary critique of a problem at a restaurant and how to resolve the issue.
    • Assign students to research careers in the hospitality industry and create a poster or electronic Glogter™ to present to class.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks:

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Cook, R. A. (2006). Tourism: The business of travel. England: PEARSON EDUC (HIGHER ED GRP). (BOX 70632) (NJ).
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    • American Hotel and Lodging Association
      the only national organization dedicated to serving the interests of hoteliers on the front line, behind the scenes, and on Capitol Hill.
      http://ahla.com/
    • Hcareers
      Where Hospitality Works
      http://www.hcareers.com/
    • National Restaurant Association
      The largest foodservice trade association in the world
      http://www.restaurant.org/Home
    • Occupational Outlook Handbook
      The Nation’s premier source for career information.
      http://www.bls.gov/ooh/

    Career Development and Employability Skills Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Fast-paced, variety, and an abundance of jobs are advantages to a career in the hospitality industry.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    2. Hours of work and stress are some of the challenges of careers in the hospitality industry.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. The four segments of the hospitality industry are: lodging, food and beverage, travel and tourism, and ______________ .

    • a. business services
    • b. environmental protection
    • c. recreation
    • d. hotels and motels

    4. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, what careers in food service can you have with less than high school education?

    • a. Bartenders
    • b. Servers
    • c. Food preparation workers
    • d. All of the above

    5. On http://www.bls.gov/ooh/ which of the following is not a category to choose from?

    • a. Life Management
    • b. Education, Training, and Library
    • c. Entertainment and Sports
    • d. Food Preparation and Serving

    6. Observing and following a person while he or she does a job is called _____________________.

    • a. Company Research
    • b. Occupational Outlook
    • c. Job Shadowing
    • d. Information Interview

    7. You can find resume tools on www.hcareers.com

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • XVI. Entrepreneurship

    Business Meeting Notes

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary educational opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry

    (2) The student uses listening, oral, written, and media communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information.

    • (F) design and present a marketing tool to promote a hospitality product that may contribute to the local economy

    (3) The student researches career opportunities and qualifications to broaden awareness of careers available in the hospitality industry.

    • (I) describe the types of facility ownership and determine the advantages and disadvantages for each

    (7) The student solves problems using critical-thinking skills independently and in teams.

    • (E) create a business plan to examine employment opportunities in entrepreneurship

    Module Content

    Entrepreneurship is the sixteenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Forms of ownership
    • B. Business plan
    • C. Resources for entrepreneurs

    A. Forms of Ownership

    One of the most important decisions an entrepreneur makes is about the ownership structure.

    Three forms of business ownership are:

    • sole proprietorship
    • partnership
    • corporation

    There are advantages and disadvantages to each one.

    • Sole Proprietorship
      • Advantages: easy to start, minimal government regulation, ownership has total control
      • Disadvantages: unlimited liability, owner has responsibility
    • Partnership
      • Advantages: easy to start, minimal government regulation, partners share control
      • Disadvantages: potential conflict among partners, unlimited liability
    • Corporation
      • Advantages: limited liability, easier to raise money for the business
      • Disadvantages: complicated and costly to start, many government regulations

    B. Business Plan

    A business plan is a written document that describes the business and how it will operate. A business plan is a required part of a business loan application. Writing a business plan is not just a writing assignment. It is also a very valuable planning tool. Researching and writing a business plan will help you figure out how to start and run your business successfully.

    Parts of a Business Plan

    • Executive summary
      • summarizes key points about the business and is usually written last
    • Description of business
      • includes business concept, goals, and ownership structure
    • Industry/market analysis
      • should describe the competitive edge that the business will have over other businesses
    • Customers
      • description of target market
    • Marketing plan
      • four P’s of marketing: product, price, place, and promotion
    • Operations plan
      • should cover:
        • organizational chart
        • operations procedures
        • material resources needed
        • human resources needed
        • staffing plan
    • Financial plan
      • describes how you will fund the business and how you expect to make a profit
    • Growth plan
      • describes how the business will grow

    View video on business plans:

    C. Resources for Entrepreneurs

    The US government continues to promote entrepreneurship. The major government agency that helps new businesses and entrepreneurs is the U.S. Small Business Administration. Congress created the SBA in 1953 to help American entrepreneurs form small successful businesses.

    View video about the SBA:

    Other resources include:

    • Service Corps of Retired Executive (SCORE) – volunteers that help new entrepreneurs develop business plans
    • library – books and magazines about business management, financing, marketing, and hiring and managing staff
    • professional organizations – can be helpful in finding information
    • local chamber of commerce – a group of people who work together to promote businesses in the area

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Allow students work together to create a business plan for a unique hospitality business. They should include an interview with a manager or owner who currently owns/operates a similar business.
    • Download business plan templates from Microsoft Office® Word and allow students to develop a business following the steps.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Anthony, V. R (2013). Hospitality and restaurant marketing. Boston, Mass.; Munich: Pearson
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    • U.S. Small Business Administration
      The U.S. Small Business Administration has delivered millions of loans, loan guarantees, contracts, counseling sessions and other forms of assistance to small businesses.
      http://www.sba.gov/

    YouTube™:

    Entrepreneurship Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What are the three forms of business ownership?

    • a. sole proprietorship, partnership and company
    • b. sole proprietorship, proprietorship and company
    • c. sole proprietorship, proprietorship and corporation
    • d. sole proprietorship, partnership and corporation

    2. Advantages of a Sole Proprietorship are?

    • a. easy to start, minimal government regulation, and ownership has total control
    • b. easy to start, minimal government regulation, partners share control
    • c. limited liability, easier to raise money for the business
    • d. unlimited liability, owner has responsibility

    3. Which is a part of a business plan?

    • a. Industry/market analysis
    • b. Marketing plan
    • c. Operations plan
    • d. All of the above

    4. The SBA allows small businesses to create a business plan and qualify for government contracts.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. Which of the following online training courses can you take on www.sba.gov?

    • a. Personal Injury
    • b. Hiring and Firing Employees
    • c. How to Start a Business
    • d. Crime Prevention

    6. The Chamber of Commerce is a network of businesses whose main objective is to promote and ensure the livelihood of local businesses.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • XVII. Technology

    businessman

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary educational opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry
    • (E) gather information from domestic and international sources using tools such as the Internet and maps to plan travel to other countries

    (2) The student uses listening, oral, written, and media communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information.

    • (F) design and present a marketing tool to promote a hospitality product that may contribute to the local economy

    (3) The student researches career opportunities and qualifications to broaden awareness of careers available in the hospitality industry.

    • (B) demonstrate flexibility to learn new knowledge and skills

    (5) The student uses information technology tools specific to hospitality service careers to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (A) examine types of technology used to manage hospitality service operations
    • (B) research website information on hospitality service operations
    • (C) evaluate current and emerging technologies provided by the hospitality industry to improve guest service

    (10) The student uses technological knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in food service.

    • (A) use technology to develop a set of operating procedures to comply with company requirements

    Module Content

    Technology is the seventeenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the five TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Technology in the hospitality industry
    • B. Internet research
    • C. Website comparison
    • D. Technology etiquette
    • E. Technology trends

    Refer to lesson: Leaving on a Jet Plane for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/leaving-on-a-jet-plane

    Refer to lesson: Take a Byte: Technology in the Hospitality Services Industry (focus on hotel industry) for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/take-a-byte-technology-in-the-hospitality-industry

    A. Technology in the hospitality industry

    The Internet has had a large impact on the hospitality industry. Using the Internet, customers can research many kinds of hospitality businesses. Customers can then visit the website of the specific hospitality business.

    Website information includes:

    • making reservations
    • checking flight status
    • checking rates
    • checking dates of operation
    • amenities available

    Technology has made a huge difference in how information has been communicated in the lodging industry. Computer software called a property management system keeps track of all the information on the computers. Before computers, all this information was recorded and kept in paper files. The computer makes it much easier to keep track of and use this information.

    The food and beverage industry uses a computer system called a point of sales system (POS). This system replaces the handwritten check. A server can touch a screen or handheld device to record an order. The system then sends the order to the kitchen, calculates the charges and taxes, and keeps track of items sold and inventory used. The system also generates a customer check.

    Computers also help with sanitation. Dish washing machines and laundry machines come equipped with computerized systems. These systems keep track of water temperature and instruct the machine to use exactly the amount of detergent needed. High-tech thermometers help food preparers make sure food is kept at the right temperature.

    B. Internet research

    The Internet can be confusing but stick to these rules to make sure that the information you are searching for is legitimate.

    Decide if the Topic Is ‘Hard Research’, ‘Soft Research’, or Both.
    ‘Hard’ and ‘soft’ research have different expectations of data and proof. You should know the hard or soft nature of your topic to point your search strategy where it will yield the most reliable research results.

    ‘Hard research’ describes scientific and objective research, where proven facts, figures, statistics, and measurable evidence are absolutely critical

    • credibility of every resource must be able to withstand intense scrutiny
    • topics require hard facts and academically-respected evidence
      • an opinion blog is an someone’s opinion
      • find publications by scholars, experts, and professionals with credentials
        Examples:
        • Academic journals
        • Government publications
        • Archived news

    ‘Soft research’ describes topics that are more subjective, cultural, and opinion-based.

    • sources will be less scrutinized by the readers
    • topics are often about collecting the opinions of respected online writers
    • many soft research authorities are not academics, but rather writers who have practical experience in their field
      Examples:
      • blogs, including personal opinion blogs and amateur writer blogs
      • forums and discussion sites
      • consumer product review sites

    C. Website comparison

    Some websites allow you to check several hospitality businesses at once.

    The Travelocity website lists the following choices:

    • flights
    • lodging
    • vacations
    • cruises
    • cars

    There are many other helpful websites that compare prices. Be sure to check as many as possible.

    Customers are using more computer technology in their daily lives, and they want that technology available when they travel. To meet these needs, hotels add wireless connections to hotel rooms. Airports have added wifi in the terminals while customers wait for connecting flights.

    D. Technology etiquette

    From phone calls and text messages, to emails and social media sites, technology has given us countless ways to connect with one another. But, along with this convenience comes a whole new set of etiquette rules.

    Tech savvy users are faced with the responsibility of having to know what form of communication is most appropriate, as every medium is not suitable for all situations.

    Rules to follow:

    • Human contact still matters – Don’t communicate electronically at the expense of personal interaction. There’s a reason people often need to discuss things face-to-face, and there are times when no substitute will do – whether you’re breaking up with your boyfriend or asking your boss for a raise.
    • Watch what you say, and how you say it – While the computer brings people together, its impersonal nature can lead to remarks that people wouldn’t think of saying in person. Do whatever it takes to stay courteous, even if that means taping a note to your computer reminding you to be decent and polite.
    • Be careful when clicking ‘Send’ – Whatever you say in cyberspace cannot be taken back. You have no control over where your message goes once you’ve hit Send; it can be saved and forwarded by any recipient who chooses to do so, and words have come back to hurt people, destroy friendships, and ruin careers.

    Although technology is ever-changing, basic rules of etiquette still apply. Polite electronic communication requires that you treat others as you would have them treat you.

    In hospitality settings, you may need to write an email to a hospitality business. Minimize the likelihood of committing major mistakes by simply slowing down. Make sure your messages (and subject lines) are crystal clear, and double check your recipient list and the names of any files you’ve attached. Only after running through this checklist should you hit “send.”

    E. Technology trends

    As technology developments continue at a relentless pace, it can be difficult for hotels, leisure providers and those in hospitality to keep up with recent changes, let alone look to the future.

    The savings and improvements that technology can deliver mean that managers and directors really need to keep one eye on these six trends.

    • The Cloud – no external hardware is needed
    • Mobility – use of smartphones and tablets
    • Social – websites such as Facebook and Twitter
    • Personalized systems – the welcome screen on the tv in the room
    • Integration – each individual system must work together
    • Globalization – ability to embrace other economic systems

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students use the website www.priceline.com to plan a 3-day getaway within 100 miles of where they live.
    • Have students compare several hotel websites. They must prepare a presentation of what all of the pros and cons are of each one. They can use PowerPoint™, Prezi™, or Glogster™ to do this.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    Technology Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Southwest Airlines will fly to Aruba and San Juan.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    2. Before hotels had property management systems, how did they handle customer records?

    • a. index card filing system
    • b. paper files
    • c. all of the above
    • d. none of the above

    3. Which of the following does technology advances not help in the hospitality industry?

    • a. the lodging industry can keep track of customer files
    • b. the food and beverage industry can help servers to generate a customer check
    • c. high efficiency dish washing machines can detect the amount of detergent needed
    • d. helps organize insurance claims on employees

    4. Academic journals are an example of soft research.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. Which of the following searches can you not find on www.travelocity.com?

    • a. flights
    • b. hotels
    • c. railway
    • d. group travel

    6. A customer can book a Broadway show on the internet.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    7. A technology trend that is happening now is social media.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • XVIII. Tourism

    travel

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student gains additional academic knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of career and postsecondary educational opportunities within the hospitality services industry.

    • (A) apply advanced reading, writing, and mathematical skills necessary to perform job tasks in the hospitality industry
    • (D) apply multiple time zones, climate, and seasons to create travel products
    • (E) gather information from domestic and international sources using tools such as the Internet and maps to plan travel to other countries
    • (F) examine cultural differences of other areas, regions, and countries

    (2) The student uses listening, oral, written, and media communication skills in creating, expressing, and interpreting information and ideas, including technical terminology and information.

    • (F) design and present a marketing tool to promote a hospitality product that may contribute to the local economy

    (5) The student uses information technology tools specific to hospitality service careers to access, manage, integrate, and create information.

    • (B) research website information on hospitality service operations

    (12) The student uses technological knowledge and skills required to pursue careers in travel and tourism.

    • (A) develop technical vocabulary to enhance customer service
    • (B) compare and contrast diverse transportation and lodging options to increase customer choices
    • (C) examine elements of a dining experience expected to satisfy guests at varied facilities such as a boardwalk vendor, cruise ship, chain restaurant, and a five-star dining facility
    • (D) integrate various and diverse elements of the travel and tourism industry to create a personalized travel experience for a customer
    • (E) evaluate and compare services and products from related industries

    Module Content

    Tourism is the eighteenth unit of study in the Hospitality course. This section contains the four TEA units of study that include:

    • A. What is tourism?
    • B. Domestic destinations
    • C. International destinations
    • D. Careers in the tourism industry

    Refer to lesson: Take a Byte: Technology in the Hospitality Services Industry (focus on hotel industry) for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/take-a-byte-technology-in-the-hospitality-industry

    Refer to lesson: Leaving on a Jet Plane for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/leaving-on-a-jet-plane

    A. What is tourism?

    A tourist is a person who is traveling or visiting a place for pleasure. Tourism is a collection of activities, services and industries that delivers a travel experience.

    Tourism includes:

    • transportation
    • accommodations
    • eating and drinking establishments
    • retail shops
    • entertainment businesses
    • activity facilities
    • other hospitality services provided for individuals or groups traveling away from home

    According to The World Tourism Organization (WTO), tourism is currently the worlds largest industry with annual revenues of over $3 trillion dollars. Yes, trillion!
    Tourism provides over six million jobs in the United States, making it the country’s largest employer.

    People who travel to access travel-related businesses are referred to as tourists.

    Examples of hospitality related businesses include:

    • theme parks
    • golf courses
    • casinos
    • sports leagues

    The main function of tourism is for businesses to plan vacations and tours as well as to encourage people to travel. A vacation may involve several different hospitality businesses and when people travel, they use many different hospitality related businesses.

    Tourists will spend money for:

    • transportation
    • food
    • lodging
    • recreation
    • shopping at local stores

    B. Domestic destinations

    Domestic destinations are places that people visit within their own country. Generally, such travel does not involve documents such as passports or visas. Domestic tourism (DT) is the first form of tourism that was practiced and continues to account for the most part of tourism by far. According to the World Tourism Organization It is estimated that 83% of travel corresponds to domestic tourism.

    There are many reasons why travelers choose domestic travel.

    Reasons are:

    • Time
      • as the hours for leisure increase so does the opportunity for travel
      • changes in work days or hours and school calendars will affect how and when people can travel
      • overall travel pattern has moved from a two week vacation to three or four day mini-vacations per year
    • Money
      • The majority of travel requires discretionary income
        • money left over after all monetary obligations (food, rent and taxes) have been paid
    • Mobility
      • access to transportation (car, bus, plane, train or ship)
      • hours required to get to their destination
    • Motivation
      • seeking novelty
      • education
      • meeting new people
      • adventure
      • stress reduction

    According to TripAdvisor, an online website that features reviews and advice on hotels, resorts, flights, vacation rentals, vacation packages, travel guides, the top ten domestic destinations within the United States are:

    • 1. New York
    • 2. San Francisco
    • 3. Chicago
    • 4. Las Vegas
    • 5. Orlando
    • 6. Washington
    • 7. Boston
    • 8. Los Angeles
    • 9. Honolulu
    • 10. New Orleans

    Have you visited any of these destinations? Be sure to share your experiences with your students so they may understand how vital tourism is.

    C. International destinations

    International destinations are places that people visit that require them to leave their home country.

    This travel may include:

    • passports and visas
    • permissions to travel
    • medical advisories

    TripAdvisor’s top ten international destinations:

    • 1. Paris, France
    • 2. New York, New York
    • 3. London, U.K.
    • 4. Rome, Italy
    • 5. Barcelona, Spain
    • 6. Venice, Italy
    • 7. San Francisco, California
    • 8. Florence, Italy
    • 9. Prague, Czech Republic
    • 10. Sydney, Australia

    Have you visited any of these destinations? The information you can provide to the students is invaluable. Encourage them to one day visit some of these places.

    D. Careers in the tourism industry

    Many hospitality jobs are tourism related. Employees and travel related businesses are all considered part of the tourism industry.

    Includes employees that work in:

    • hotels
    • theme parks
    • casinos
    • professional sports teams/sporting events
    • restaurants/bars/taverns
    • theater/stage productions
    • National and state parks

    Another important group in the tourism industry are travel agents.

    Travel agents:

    • can book and arrange travel to most tourist destinations
    • may specialize in a particular field of travel such as cruises or specific destinations
    • may work primarily from home
    • are typically paid by the travel related industries with whom they book

    The standard commission is 10% of sales totals.

    Handout/Graphic Organizers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students work together to create a business plan for a unique hospitality business. They should include an interview with a manager or owner who currently owns/operates a similar business.
    • Students should create a plan to sell a vacation getaway. A way to add fun could be to give the class money that they use as votes. The highest “votes” can get a prize.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Angelo, R.M. , & Vladimir, A. N. (2001). Hospitality today: An introduction. Lansing: Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association.
    • Cook, R. A. (2006). Tourism: The business of travel. England: PEARSON EDUC (HIGHER ED GRP). (BOX 70632) (NJ).
    • Reynolds, Johnny Sue. (2003). Hospitality Services. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Willcox Company.

    Websites

    • World Tourism Organization (WTO)
      The United Nations agency responsible for the promotion of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism.
      http://www2.unwto.org/
    • TripAdvisor
      Features reviews and advice on hotels, resorts, flights, vacation rentals, vacation packages, and travel guides
      http://www.tripadvisor.com/

    Tourism Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. What is an example of a hospitality related business?

    • a. theme parks and casinos
    • b. golf courses
    • c. sports leagues
    • d. all of the above

    2. People who travel for leisure are referred to as tourists.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    3. Which is a domestic location within the US?

    • a. London
    • b. Brussels
    • c. Seattle
    • d. All of the above

    4. International tourists are usually not documented by their home country as well as the immigration departments of the countries that they visit.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    5. Which of the following is not a career in the hospitality industry?

    • a. Theme parks
    • b. Stock Market
    • c. Professional sports teams/sporting events
    • d. Restaurants/bars/taverns

    6. It is estimated that approximately one-half of travel agents work primarily from home.

    • a. True
    • b. False

    7. National parks are considered part of the hospitality industry.

    • a. True
    • b. False

  • Quiz

    Hospitality Services Part II (TEKS 10-18) Online Course

    Progress:

    1. What are the three types of contaminants?

    2. Yeast is a chemical contaminant.

    3. What is the temperature danger zone?

    4. What three groups of pathogens are responsible for most of the foodborne illnesses?

    5. What are the main symptoms of foodborne illness caused by pathogens?

    6. What are three main ways to prevent foodborne illness?

    7. The main responsibility of the security department of a hotel is the protection of employees.

    8. What new technology provides many security features that can help maintain security?

    9. Why is good lighting important for both guests and employee security?

    10. Why is a good key control system needed?

    11. Which of these three categories of monetary loss is the largest?

    12. What are the three areas in which state and local governments make safety regulations?

    13. Deterrence is a strong factor in prevention.

    14. What are the most common minor accidents in the commercial kitchen?

    15. What government department is in charge of OSHA?

    16. Workers may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that their employer is not following OSHA standards or that there are serious hazards.

    17. What type of workers are not covered by OSHA?

    18. What are three of the six functions of engineering?

    19. Preventive maintenance on equipment includes replacing filters, adding lubrication to moving parts, and replacing parts that show wear.

    20. How often is deep cleaning usually done to guest rooms and in public areas?

    21. Hospitality managers are responsible for promoting the efficient use of fuel, electricity, and water. The engineering department is responsible for implementing methods of conservation.

    22. The grounds of the hotel refers to all inside areas of the building.

    23. What does grounds keeping work include?

    24. This government agency's main responsibilities are to inspect the manufacturing and the processing of fresh meat and meat products.

    25. This government agency regulates the production, packaging, and labeling of food, drugs, and cosmetics.

    26. These officials can conduct workplace inspections at any time without prior notification. They also can enforce the law.

    27. This government agency is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information

    28. This government agency was created for the purpose of protecting human health and the environment by writing and enforcing regulations based on laws passed by Congress.

    29. Unethical behavior is illegal.

    30. Fast-paced, variety, and an abundance of jobs are advantages to a career in the hospitality industry.

    31. Hours of work and stress are some of the challenges of careers in the hospitality industry.

    32. The four segments of the hospitality industry are: lodging, food and beverage, travel and tourism, and ______________ .

    33. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, what careers in food service can you have with less than high school education?

    34. Observing and following a person while he or she does a job is called _____________________.

    35. What are the three forms of business ownership?

    36. Advantages of a Sole Proprietorship are?

    37. Which is a part of a business plan?

    38. The SBA allows small businesses to create a business plan and qualify for government contracts.

    39. The Chamber of Commerce is a network of businesses whose main objective is to promote and ensure the livelihood of local businesses.

    40. Before hotels had property management systems, how did they handle customer records?

    41. A customer can book a Broadway show on the internet.

    42. A technology trend that is happening now is social media.

    43. What is an example of a hospitality related business?

    44. People who travel for leisure are referred to as tourists.

    45. Which is a domestic location within the US?

    46. Which of the following is not a career in the hospitality industry?

    47. National parks are considered part of the hospitality industry.

    48. CTE stands for:

    49. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    50. Hospitality Services is an articulated course for one credit.

    Please only click once to submit. Your answers are ready to be sent.

    Please confirm that you are human and answer on this simple math question: 7 + 4 =