Family and Community Services Online Course

  • Family and Community Services Online Course Introduction

    This self-paced professional development course will provide you with a thorough overview of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for the Family and Community Services (one-half to one credit). The suggested scope and sequence for this course is divided into five modules. Each module will be explored in addition to providing teacher with resources, references, suggested teaching strategies and a five question assessment.

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) program of study; understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 career clusters and 79 career pathways, and that Family and Community Services is one of 12 courses in the Human Services career cluster that equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Family and Community Services is a laboratory-based course (one-half to one credit) designed to involve students in realistic and meaningful community-based activities through direct service experiences. Students are provided opportunities to interact and provide services to individuals, families, and the community through community or volunteer services. Emphasis is placed on developing and enhancing organizational and leadership skills and characteristics.

    Important
    This online course consists of an introduction and five modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons, and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers, and slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. 12 pre-assessment multiple choice statements can be found at the end of the Introduction. Each module ends with five multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address. You will receive a certificate of completion at that address.

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equalling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to the Introductory Lesson: Family and Community Services for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses, and programs of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/introductory-lesson-family-and-community-services/

    Important
    Be sure to open all the attachments below that correspond to this course as you will need to refer to them as you follow along. All of the handouts and graphic organizers are available for you to use in your classroom. All keys are included.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Students can earn _____________credits in the Family and Community Services course.

    • a. one-half to one credit
    • b. one to two credits
    • c. two credits
    • d. one and a half credits

    2. This course is recommended for students in grades 11-12. The recommended prerequisite is___________.

    • a. Human Growth and Development
    • b. Principles of Human Services
    • c. Child Development
    • d. Child Guidance

    3. All successful leaders possess certain leadership skills. Leaders who possess these traits have the ability to work in a professional manner. These traits include all the following except one:

    • a. good communication skills with children, adults, community leaders and agencies
    • b. having a negative attitude toward a particular situation or person
    • c. ethical principles
    • d. display self-discipline in setting and meeting goals

    4. In 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as__________ million Americans volunteered through an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010.

    • a. 65.3
    • b. 46.3
    • c. 64.3
    • d. 78.3

    5. Over the past two decades we have seen a growing body of research that indicates volunteering provides individual _________ benefits in addition to social benefits.

    • a. monetary
    • b. academic
    • c. health
    • d. status

    6. President George H.W. Bush created the ____________________ to administer grants to schools to support service-learning in schools, higher education institutions, and community-based organizations and support full-time service across the nation.

    • a. Commission on Natural and Community Service
    • b. VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America)
    • c. Commission on National and Community Service
    • d. USA Freedom Corps

    7. The process by which people learn characteristics of their group’s norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors is called _______________.
    a. sociability
    b. socialism
    c. socialization
    d. social science

    8. Through community service, the doors of communication open between students, teachers and administrators. They all work together to _________, designate responsibilities, and ______________.
    a. set goals
    b. identify family strengths
    c. create a strategic plan
    d. a and c

    9. The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH)—updated every two years by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—is a career guide that describes, for hundreds of occupations,

    • a. What workers do on the job
    • b. Work environment
    • c. The education and training and other qualifications needed to enter the occupation
    • d. All of the above

    10. Job Outlook for employment of social and community service managers is expected to grow by __________ from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected because of increases in the aging population, increases in demand for substance abuse treatment, and overall population growth.

    • a. 25 percent
    • b. 28 percent
    • c. 27 percent
    • d. 29 percent

    11. The first step in dealing with differences among students is to:

    • a. take sides immediately
    • b. refuse to listen and punish both sides
    • c. admit they happen
    • d. ignore them and let the students work it out

    12. Management involves all the following basic functions except one:

    • a. planning
    • b. implementing
    • c. leadership
    • d. evaluating

  • I. Leadership and Interpersonal Communication

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student demonstrates organizational and leadership skills using a community service environment. The student is expected to:

    • (A) demonstrate management practices facilitating individuals assuming multiple family, community, and wage-earner roles
    • (B) evaluate personal leadership characteristics
    • (C) develop a plan for positively enhancing personal leadership characteristics
    • (D) demonstrate positive interpersonal skills, including conflict resolution, negotiation, teamwork, and leadership
    • (E) evaluate and identify effective strategies and skills necessary to establish a collaborative relationship with others in community service settings
  • Module Content

    Leadership and Interpersonal Communication is the first unit of study in the Family and Community Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Skills
    • B. Applications

    Refer to lesson Count Me In for resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/count-me-in

    Refer to lesson Follow the Leader for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/follow-the-leader

    Refer to lesson Family and Community Skills for Life for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/family-and-community-skills-for-life

    Module I Handouts

    A. Skills

    As parents and teachers, we all want our children to grow up to be responsible citizens and good people. We want them to learn to feel, think and act with respect for themselves and for other people. We want them to pursue their own well-being, while also being considerate of the needs and feelings of others. We want them to recognize and honor the democratic principles upon which our country was founded. We want them, in short, to develop strong character and strong leadership skills.

    All successful leaders possess certain leadership skills. Leaders who possess these traits have the ability to work in a professional manner. These traits include the following:

    • care and concern for their community
    • desire to learn more about people, community resources and volunteering opportunities
    • good communication skills with children, adults, community leaders and agencies
    • good physical and mental health
    • ethical principles
    • show compassion
    • are honest and fair
    • display self-discipline in setting and meeting goals
    • make good judgments
    • show respect to others
    • show courage in standing up for beliefs
    • have a strong sense of responsibility
    • are good citizens who are concerned for their community
    • maintain self-respect

    B. Applications

    • In 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as 64.3 million Americans volunteered through an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010.
    • Americans volunteered a total of almost 8 billion hours, an estimated economic value of roughly $171 billion.
    • A majority of Americans assisted their neighbors in some way and more than a third actively participated in a civic, religious, or school group.
    • Americans overwhelmingly volunteered in schools or with other youth organizations, working to advance the lives of young people.
    • Nearly three out of five volunteers aged 25-54 are parents to children who are under 18. These parents volunteered well above the national average, focusing on helping fill local needs while also serving as role models—showing their children that community involvement is a critical choice and habit that can improve lives.
    • Nine out of 10 parents in 2011 reported feeling some or a great deal of confidence in the public schools to do the right thing.

    Effective strategies and skills necessary to establish a collaborative relationship with others in community service settings are as follows:

    Compassion, or empathy
    It means identifying with and being concerned about other people’s feelings and needs. It provides the emotional root for caring about other people. It allows us to be understanding and tolerant of different points of views and beliefs, it makes us aware of the suffering of others, and it allows us to empathize with them or to feel their suffering as our own. Compassion also allows us to feel joy and excitement— rather than anger and despair—at other people’s successes and achievements.

    Honesty and Fairness
    Simply put, honesty means being truthful with ourselves and with others. It means caring enough about others not to mislead them for personal benefit. It means facing up to our mistakes, even when we have to admit them to others or when they may get us into trouble. Fairness means acting in a just way and making decisions, especially important ones, on the basis of evidence rather than prejudice. It means “playing by the rules” and standing up for the right of everyone to be treated equally and honestly.

    Self-discipline
    Self-discipline is the ability to set a realistic goal or make a plan—then stick with it. It is the ability to resist doing things that can hurt others or ourselves. It involves keeping promises and following through on commitments. It is the foundation of many other qualities of character. Often self-discipline requires persistence and sticking to long-term commitments—putting off immediate pleasure for later fulfillment. It also includes dealing effectively with emotions, such as anger and envy, and developing patience.

    Learning self-discipline helps students regulate their behavior and gives them the willpower to make good decisions and choices. On the other hand, the failure to develop self-discipline leaves students wide open to destructive behavior. Without the ability to control or evaluate their impulses, they often dive headlong into harmful situations.

    Positive Attitude
    A person’s self-image, relationships with others, and success in achieving goals are influenced by his or her attitude. Attitude involves one’s general manner or feeling toward a situation or person, A positive work attitude means thinking about the work in a favorable manner. It is most important in getting a job completed.

    When a person exhibits a positive attitude and other positive human relations traits, goals are achieved more easily and stress is reduced. Having a negative attitude toward a particular situation or person causes problems to appear more serious than they actually are. Cooperation, loyalty, optimism, patience, respect, enthusiasm, interest, and willingness are traits that show a person has a positive attitude.

    Initiative
    Initiative is the ability to think and act without being prompted. A person with initiative is one who is willing and able to observe tasks that need to be done and complete them without being told to do so. A willingness to learn is also a sign of initiative. The person who is eager to learn will ask about opportunities for growth and learning. Teachers and employers recognize initiative by giving increasing responsibility to those students who show an interest in opportunities to learn new skills.

    Cooperation
    Cooperation involves willingness to listen to other people’s views and opinions and to work toward common goals. Willingness to complete all assigned tasks with a positive attitude is another characteristic of a cooperative person. Even if personality problems exist between two people, it is important for both individuals to avoid petty differences and work together as well as possible. Willingness to cooperate with co-workers on a project without insisting on doing things a particular way contributes to a positive environment for everyone.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module I Handouts

    • A Leader is …
    • Count Me In Notes
    • Count Me In Notes (Key)
    • Follow the Leader Notes
    • Follow the Leader Notes (Key)
    • I Am a LEADER
    • Initial Contact Information Sheet
    • Join Us
    • Lead and They Will Follow
    • My Leadership Profile
    • Rubric for Join Us Project
    • Rubric for Written Report
    • Rubric for Lead and They Will Follow Presentation
    • Steps in Conflict Resolution
    • Teacher Notes Steps in Conflict Resolution
    • Tell Me About It
    • Volunteer Profile
    • Where Do You Rank
    • Where You Lead, I Will Follow

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Lead students to work in pairs or groups to “draw” a picture of an effective leader. Give sufficient time for this activity, and then have students present their leaders to the class. Have students share why they drew what they did and what characteristics of effective leadership were portrayed in their pictures. Discuss why these characteristics would be important for leadership in the community and in the voluntary sector.
    • Write the word community on the board or overhead. Lead students to share what the word community means to them and brainstorm various communities in which they participate. Record their responses.
    • Write the word service on the board or overhead. Lead students to share what they think of when they hear the word service and to brainstorm different types of service they have performed or observed. Tie in the concept of community by pointing out types of service within various communities.
    • Building upon student brainstorming and discussion, introduce students to the Family and Community Service course. As part of the overview, lead students to understand how core academic concepts will be reinforced through study and participation in community service activities. As an example, students might brainstorm possible service projects that would develop concepts and skills related to English language arts, math, science, and social studies.
    • Display the visuals: post pictures of leaders such as Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson, Condoleeza Rice, Barbara Bush, Ronald Reagan, and the school Principal, Assistant Principals and school district superintendent throughout the classroom. Allow students to view the visuals as they enter the classroom to stimulate discussion.
    • Think-Pair-Share
      Divide students into pairs.
      Each team will brainstorm and create a list of management and leadership characteristics the leaders from the visual props possess. Students will each identify 2-3 strengths of their own. Examples may include: poised, takes initiative, skilled communicator, respects others, works well with others, well prepared, cooperative, hard worker, good manager, dependable, democratic, confident, accepts responsibility, neat appearance, respected by others, open minded, well informed, courteous, visionary, thinks ahead, punctual, service-oriented.
    • Discuss the importance of these skills in their current and future lives.
    • Brainstorm: Why is it important for leaders to possess these qualities? How does one acquire these skills?
    • View and discuss YouTube video:
      What Great Bosses know about Leadership Styles
      http://youtu.be/hj7JxPZ9QMw
    • Take Action Against Bullying
      Learn more about prevention and response strategies for: peer conflict, teen dating violence, hazing, gang violence, harassment, stalking, workplace bullying, cyberbullying, early childhood and young adults.
      http://www.stopbullying.gov/
    • Free iPad App: iLeadership
      Easy to use guide for leadership ideas
    • Distribute graphic organizer Steps in Conflict Resolution. Students will complete and discuss their responses. Teacher will use Teacher Notes Steps in Conflict Resolution to assist in the lesson.
    • Students will analyze their own leadership, negotiation/teamwork skills and conflict resolution styles by writing responses to the following scenarios:
      • The company you work for is expecting a visit from the corporate office in the morning. Your boss has asked you to make sure the store is clean and orderly. You have never before closed the store without another manager. It’s up to you to make sure everything is perfect. What leadership and teamwork skills will you have to utilize in order to accomplish the task?
      • Your best friend thinks you lied to them. They are extremely upset and giving you the silent treatment. What conflict resolution skills will you use to solve this problem?
      • You and your sister are getting your driver’s licenses at the same time. Your parents plan to purchase one additional family car. You and your sister will have to share the use of this vehicle. Outline the negotiations that will have to be established in order for this situation to work.
    • Distribute My Leadership Profile handout and direct students to complete the handout. Discuss the results of their answers.
    • Divide students into subgroups of two or three and introduce group project.
      • Scenario: You work for a company that has been charged with creating a training manual entitled “Developing Interpersonal and Leadership Skills”. This manual will be purchased by companies for employee training sessions.
      • Each employee (student) is required to develop a case study on a specific interpersonal or leadership skill. Case studies must include a scenario/situation involving individuals or groups of individuals dealing with job related issues. Each case study must include a summary of the skill that is being addressed as well as ten open-ended questions that will be answered by the employee trainees. All case studies will be incorporated into a training manual and utilized by the employees. Students will make a presentation to the class on their case study, explaining the reasoning behind their case study selection and choice of questions.
    • The case studies will be assessed using Rubric for Written Report. (See All Lesson Attachments tab). Review each component of the rubric.
    • Assign specific pages for students to read from Stephen Covey’s, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens.
      • Pair off students and use the ”read, write, pair, share” strategy.
      • First students read independently, then write about what they have read and finally discuss with a partner, their insight on what was read.
    • Ball Toss Review
      At the end of the lesson review terms, definitions and objectives. Have students take turns telling the class what they have learned from this lesson.
      Instruct everyone to stand in a circle and toss a ball to each other. Whoever catches the ball has to answer a question. If the student does not know the answer, they can pass the ball to another student.
      Questions:
    • What are some responsibilities adults have in managing multiple family, community, and career roles?
    • What are some responsibilities students have in managing multiple family, community, and career roles?
    • Why is it important for you to think about the challenges of managing multiple family, community, and career roles now?
    • What does arbitration mean? Why is it important to seeking a solution to a conflict?
    • What are your strongest qualities as a team member?
    • Which qualities need improvement?
    • What plan of action can you take to help you improve these qualities?
    • How will improving these qualities benefit you at school? At home? In the community? In the workplace?
    • In what other ways will you benefit by improving these qualities?
    • What qualities were most frequently cited as important to working effectively as a team member?
    • What happens to a team when these qualities are not exhibited by group members?
    • How can teams improve the teamwork skills of each member and the group as a whole?
    • What are some qualities of a good leader?
    • What does negotiation mean and how is it helpful in a conflict situation?
    • An enrichment activity could be creating additional scenario/case studies to present to the class that incorporates one of the elements of the lesson. This might be over leadership styles, multiple family roles, community roles, wage-earner roles, conflict resolution or negotiation styles. Be prepared to take questions and provide the class with a solution to the scenario. This scenario should incorporate a technology connection such as PowerPoint or video of a scenario.
    • Guest Speakers options include:
      Mediation, Negotiation or Arbitration specialist, Coach to discuss the importance of teamwork, Military Officer to discuss the importance of peaceful conflict resolution.
    • Homework options include:
      Creation of a survey regarding the prevalence of negotiation and conflict resolution in the home. Students should then survey friends and family members using the survey they created and present findings to the class.
    • Discuss fairness in different situations. For example, how do we show fairness in our family? What does fairness mean to the community? What were standards of fairness in the past?
    • Talk about how you try to be fair in your life and work. What issues of justice have you wrestled with? Your students will be particularly interested in talking with you about these things.
    • Be a model of honest relations with others.
    • Discuss what honesty is and is not. Point out, for example, that being honest doesn’t mean telling someone you think he looks ugly. Kindness goes along with honesty.

    References and Resources

    Books

    • Covey, S. (1998).The 7 habits of highly effective teens. New York: Fireside.
    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. (2004). Family and community services I and II. Lubbock: Texas Tech University.

    Websites

    YouTube™

    • What Great Bosses know about Leadership Styles
      Every manager has a leadership style. Just ask the staff. Great bosses understand they need to adapt their style to fit the situation.
      http://youtu.be/hj7JxPZ9QMw

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. All successful leaders possess certain leadership skills. Leaders who possess these traits have the ability to work in a professional manner. These traits include all the following except one:

    • a. good communication skills with children, adults, community leaders and agencies
    • b. having a negative attitude toward a particular situation or person
    • c. ethical principles
    • d. display self-discipline in setting and meeting goals

    2. In 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as__________ million Americans volunteered through an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010.

    • a. 65.3
    • b. 46.3
    • c. 64.3
    • d. 78.3

    3. A majority of Americans assisted their neighbors in some way and more than a third actively participated in a civic, religious, or___________ group.

    • a. school
    • b. work
    • c. hospital
    • d. law enforcement

    4. _____________ means identifying with and being concerned about other people’s feelings and needs.

    • a. Leadership skills
    • b. Honesty
    • c. Positive attitude
    • d. Compassion, or empathy

    5. A person with______________ is one who is willing and able to observe tasks that need to be done and complete them without being told to do so. A willingness to learn is also a sign of this trait. The person who is also eager to learn will ask about opportunities for growth and learning.

    • a. self-discipline
    • b. inimical
    • c. initiative
    • d. initiate

  • II. Meaningful and Relevant Service

    TEKS Addressed

    (3) The student develops and implements community service activities. The student is expected to:

    • (A) identify service projects applicable to a community
    • (B) integrate student interest, abilities, and skills with appropriate community service projects
    • (C) plan, develop, and implement volunteer activities that will benefit individuals, families, or the community
    • (D) generate ideas and gather information relevant to a family and community services project keeping careful records of outside sources
    • (E) demonstrate proficient use of volunteer skills
    • (F) demonstrate safety practices related to community service or volunteer activities
    • (G) demonstrate increasing ability to perform higher-order thinking skills through organizing and performing community service
    • (H) practice techniques to ensure completion of a community service project
    • (I) cite evidence of personal development through performing community service activities and
    • (J) evaluate the effectiveness of implemented activities
  • Module Content

    Meaningful and Relevant Service is the second unit of study in the Family and Community Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Volunteerism
    • B. Reflection

    Refer to lesson Serving Those Who Serve for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-those-who-serve

    Refer to lesson Serving Senior Citizens for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-seniors-connecting-our-past-to-the-future

    Refert to lesson Focus on Serving Children – Our Future for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/focus-on-serving-children-our-future

    Module II Handouts

    Volunteerism

    Intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character, that is the goal of true education.
    -Martin Luther King Jr.

    Perhaps the first and biggest benefit people get from volunteering is the satisfaction of incorporating service into their lives and making a difference in their community and country.

    The intangible benefits alone—such as pride, satisfaction, and accomplishment—are worthwhile reasons to serve. In addition, when we share our time and talents we:

    • Solve Problems
    • Strengthen Communities
    • Improve Lives
    • Connect to Others
    • Transform Our Own Lives

    Volunteering has long been a common ethic in the United States, with people each year giving their time without any expectation of compensation. While these volunteer activities may be performed with the core intention of helping others, there is also a common wisdom that those who give of themselves also receive. Researchers have attempted to measure the benefits that volunteers receive, including the positive feeling referred to as “helper’s high,” increased trust in others, and increased social and political participation. Over the past two decades we have seen a growing body of research that indicates volunteering provides individual health benefits in addition to social benefits. This research has established a strong relationship between volunteering and health: those who volunteer have lower mortality rates, greater functional ability, and lower rates of depression later in life than those who do not volunteer. Comparisons of the health benefits of volunteering for different age groups have also shown that older volunteers are the most likely to receive greater benefits from volunteering, whether because they are more likely to face higher incidence of illness or because volunteering provides them with physical and social activity and a sense of purpose at a time when their social roles are changing. Some of these findings also indicate that volunteers who devote a “considerable” amount of time to volunteer activities (about 100 hours per year) are most likely to exhibit positive health outcomes.

    Find a Volunteer Opportunity

    Volunteering is an activity that is available to everybody, regardless of age, economic status, or ability. Serve.gov is your online resource for not only finding volunteer opportunities in your community, but also creating your own. Use Serve.gov to help you do your part. America’s foundation will be built one community at a time –- and it starts with you.

    10 TIPS ON BECOMING A VOLUNTEER
    (adapted from materials compiled by the nonprofit coalition Independent Sector )

    1. Research the causes or issues that are important to you. Look for a group that deals with issues about which you feel strongly.
    2. Consider what you have to offer. If you enjoy outdoor work, or have a knack for teaching, you may want to look for a volunteer opportunity in which your special skills can be utilized. Similarly, you may want to think about your specific personality and how your organization skills or communication style might fit with different organizations or activities.
    3. Think outside the box! Many community groups that are looking for volunteers, like neighborhood watch programs, prisons, disaster relief organizations, youth organizations, intergenerational programs, and park services may not have occurred to you but could just be the perfect fit.
    4. There’s no need to wait to be asked. There are many ways to find organizations that are looking for volunteers. Ask your friends or colleagues about their own volunteering activities. The Internet has great online volunteer referral services, including http://www.volunteer.gov or try visiting your local volunteer center. These services can help you to find the right volunteer opportunity for you.
    5. When you find an organization that is in line with your interests, request an interview and plan for it in much the same way that you would plan for a job interview. Be ready to describe your interests, qualifications, and background, and also be prepared to ask your interviewers about their organization and the benefits they offer to their volunteers. An interview will allow you and the organization to find the right match for your skills and interests.
    6. Would you like to learn something new? Consider whether the organization offers training or professional development opportunities for their volunteers. Volunteering can provide you with the chance to learn about something you’re interested in and develop skills in a new area.
    7. Find the volunteer activity that fits your schedule. Organizations need different levels of commitment for different types of volunteer activities. Serving as a mentor, for example, will require a regular, intensive commitment, while volunteering for a walk-a-thon is a seasonal commitment.
    8. Volunteer with friends or as a family. Think about looking for a volunteer opportunity that would be suitable for parents and children to do together, or for husband and wife or a group of friends to take on as a team. Volunteering with others can be a great way to get to know people better and can help keep you excited about volunteering.
    9. Virtual Volunteering- yes, there is such a thing. If you have computer access and the necessary skills, some organizations now offer the opportunity to do volunteer work over the computer. This can be a great way to get started in volunteering, and can also provide a way to volunteer at home on a flexible schedule.
    10. Don’t give up! If you find that your volunteering experience is not all that you expected, talk to your volunteer supervisor or coordinator about it. Think of what could make it better and check with them to see if your ideas are possibilities.

    TIPS FOR YOUTH WHO WANT TO VOLUNTEER

    1. Take the lead! Is there an issue in your community that you would like to see addressed? If you’re not sure where to begin, ask a parent, teacher, or community leader to help you to get started. And then see how you can make a difference.
    2. Get your friends involved and meet new people too! Volunteering with old and new friends can be lots of fun, and it’s also a great way to boost your confidence.
    3. Find your inner hero. Have you dreamt of being a doctor or a fire fighter? You can check out opportunities at local hospitals and fire departments to get a glimpse of what community heroes are doing, and to make a difference as part of their team.
    4. Ask your school about group opportunities. Sometimes classes will get a chance to serve together, or there might be clubs at school that you could join and serve with. This can be a great way to get to know your classmates better, and can be a great way to make new friends at your school.
    5. If you play a sport, or take dance classes, or are involved in any other kinds of activities, talk to your coach or instructor and see if your team or class might be able to do something together.
    What a fun way to hang out with your friends outside of practice!
    6. Talk with your parents, friends, teachers, and other adults about your volunteer activities. Not only will you be encouraging them to serve, you will have the chance to reflect upon how your activities change you and your community.
    7. Volunteer with your family. Get your family involved in one of the National Days of Service, such as Make a Difference Day and Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, and spend a day painting murals or cleaning your neighborhood park. Check out http://www.mlkday.gov for more information.

    Reflection

    Government Support for Volunteering

    Federal Support

    With a clear appreciation for how a culture of citizenship, service and responsibility enrich a nation and its citizenry, the Federal government has supported volunteering and community service in a variety of important and different ways during the past century. Highlights of that history include the following:

    • 1930s: At the height of the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) as a way to put idle hands to productive use to meet public needs. From 1933 to 1942, the CCC put some 3 million unemployed men to work clearing trails and restoring public lands. They have been credited with renewing the nation’s decimated forests by planting an estimated 3 billion trees. And more than 40,000 illiterates were taught to read and write through the education component of the corps.
    • 1960s: The cause of federally supported civilian service was renewed with President John F. Kennedy’s creation of the Peace Corps and President Lyndon B. Johnson’s creation of VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America). In that same period, the Foster Grandparents, Senior Companions, and Retired Senior Volunteer Program began to show how older Americans could establish meaningful relationships with people in need.
    • 1990: President George H.W. Bush created the Commission on National and Community Service to administer grants to schools to support service-learning in schools, higher education institutions, and community-based organizations and support full-time service across the nation.
    • 1993: President Bill Clinton and Congress created the Corporation for National and Community Service by combining the Commission on National and Community Service with the federal domestic volunteer agency ACTION, uniting the full range of domestic community service programs under the umbrella of one central organization and creating a new national service program: AmeriCorps.
    • 2002: President George W. Bush created USA Freedom Corps, a White House office to coordinate national volunteer efforts in response to the terror attacks of September 11, 2001. Beyond the existing AmeriCorps, Senior Corps, Peace Corps, and Learn and Serve America programs, USA Freedom Corps spurs the creation of several new volunteer programs aimed specifically at securing the nation, including Citizen Corps Councils in all U.S. states and territories. In addition, the President calls on all Americans to devote the equivalent of two years of their lives—4,000 hours—to service and volunteering.

    State Support

    When the Corporation for National and Community Service was created in 1993, Congress charged individual states with a critical role in managing national service resources through the creation of governor-appointed State Service Commissions in nearly every state and in most U.S. territories. In addition to setting national service funding priorities and making and monitoring AmeriCorps grants, these commissions typically serve as the lead statewide agency to mobilize volunteers and promote community service within their respective states. Every year, governors and State Service Commissions distribute more than $250 million dollars from federal national service funds, which in turn leverage more than $100 million in local funding to support citizen service and volunteering in America.

    In addition, Learn and Serve America grants are distributed through State Education Agencies to local schools and community organizations to implement service-learning programs for young people of elementary and secondary school age. Each State Education Agency builds a network of teachers and school administrators, parents, and community agency partners who are knowledgeable about service-learning and work to ensure that any school or community can start or expand service-learning.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module II Handouts

    • 10 Tips for Volunteering
    • Blue Sky Activity
    • Dos and Don’ts of Successful Volunteering
    • Focus on Serving Children – Our Future Notes
    • Guidelines for eBooks
    • How to Do A FCCLA Community Service Project
    • Interview Questions: Volunteer Agencies and Organizations
    • My Volunteering Journal
    • Rubric for eBooks
    • Rubric for Service Learning Project – Senior Citizens
    • Rubric for Service Learning Project – Veterans
    • Sample Invitation
    • Sample Project Focusing on Children
    • Sample Project Focusing on Veterans
    • Sample Senior Citizens Project Option
    • Service Learning Log
    • Services Match-Up
    • Serving Senior Citizens Project Ideas
    • Serving Seniors Notes
    • Serving Those Who Serve Notes (Key)
    • Serving Those Who Serve Notes
    • Serving Veterans Project Ideas
    • Stick Up Organization
    • STOPLIGHT
    • Tips for Families Who Want to Volunteer
    • Tips for Youths Who Want to Volunteer
    • Which Is It Game
    • Working with Senior Citizens Assessment
    • You’ve Got Mail Reflection

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students in the class invite a representative sampling of community volunteers to participate in a panel discussion about characteristics needed for effective volunteers and their perceived role of a volunteer. Work with students to ensure that panelists represent a variety of ages and life-cycle stages. Lead students to develop a list of questions in advance. Sample questions include the following:
      • Where do you volunteer?
      • In what types of activities do you participate as a volunteer?
      • Why do you volunteer?
      • What characteristics do you have that contribute to your role as a volunteer?
      • Do other members of your family volunteer as well? Please elaborate.
      • How do volunteer roles and responsibilities change throughout the family life cycle?
      • What rewards do you experience as a volunteer?
    • Students will complete handout Interview Questions: Volunteer Agencies and Organizations as the representative sampling of community volunteers present their information in a panel discussion.
    • To help foster students’ leadership and communication skills, have them develop introductions for their volunteers and write thank-you notes after the panel. Students can also be guided to assist with scheduling and arrangements in preparation for the panel discussion.
    • Use the attached zip file containing 16 Child Safety Fact Sheets which may be used when addressing Family and Community Services TEKS.
    • A FCCLA Community Service project is a planned series of actions designed to make things better in your community. Follow the five-step FCCLA planning process that is described on handout How to Do A FCCLA Community Service Project.
    • Free iPad App: The App Guide to Community Service
      (iPhone) Search for community service opportunities in your area
    • Talk with your students about setting reachable goals. For example, help them break big tasks into little tasks that can be accomplished one at a time. Have the student pick a task and set a deadline for completing it. When the deadline has passed, check together to see if the task was completed.
    • Help your students build a sense of their competence. To do this, they need experiences of success, no matter how small. This builds confidence and effort for the next time. Keep making the tasks just a little more challenging but doable.
    • Students will complete My Volunteering Journal to record their thoughts about the importance of volunteering.
    • Students will complete Services Match-Up to determine the type of service that best matches the activity.
    • Students will read Dos and Don’ts of Successful Volunteering.
    • Students will read and discuss the information on the handouts Tips for Families Who Want to Volunteer and Tips for Youths Who Want to Volunteer
    • Students will develop a list of additional tips for volunteering after reading 10 Tips for Volunteering.
    • Students will play matching game with Which Is It Game to understand the differences between service learning and community service.
    • Teach an Introduction to Philanthropy (www.learningtogive.org/genonltg/, click on “September”) unit or a Learning to Give unit (www.learningtogive.org/teachers/) to introduce the concept of giving time, talent, and treasure and taking action for the common good.
    • Work with the school administration to reserve an appropriate area to hold the collection items.
    • Be sure to prepare students with information on safety issues related to any solicitation.
    • Obtain permission for students to leave the grounds if the event is held offsite.
    • Make time for reflection before, during, and after the project.
    • Utilize activities www.learningtogive.org/youthworkers/02activities.asp that motivate and teach the concepts of philanthropy, service, and good character for use in service project meetings.
    • Host a “Recipe Drive” to add to a food drive, and create a cookbook using ingredients from the food gathered. (Some of the food recipients might not have knowledge how to serve a food item they’ve received.)
    • Have the director of a local homeless shelter give a presentation about homelessness in your city/town.
    • Have each classroom create a “collected-food sculpture.” Then have a volunteer from the receiving agency judge and give awards for the most creative, tallest, best theme, etcetera. Have an award or recognition for that classroom(s). (Check out www.canstruction.org to see some structures.)
    • Invite families and community to a service celebration.
    • Discuss the meaning of community as it relates to the student’s experience: home, school, friends, neighborhood, city, state, country, and world. Ask students to identify what is good about their community and what they would like to see improved or changed by completing the handout Blue Sky Activity.
    • Students color paper grocery bags to distribute to local grocery stores. Make a sign asking local residents to donate grocery items by filling one of those decorated sacks. Collect the filled sacks near the end of the food drive to add to the school/classroom’s collection. (Display the bags in the stores’ windows and carts so people can make a contribution before and after they shop.)
    • Volunteer to stock the shelves at the local food pantry
    • Choose a different theme for different days during a food drive. Here are some ideas:
      • A Taste of Italy Day – collect canned spaghetti sauce, pasta, and tomato products
      • Vegetarian Day – collect foods that do not include meat products
      • Back to School Day – collect favorite lunch box items such as peanut butter and jelly
      • Meat Me for Dinner Day – collect canned tuna and other canned meat items
      • Do You Know the Muffin Man Day – collect breakfast items, such as muffin mix, boxed cereal, pancake or baking mix, syrup, and canned fruit
      • Multicultural Day – collect pasta, spaghetti, sauce, rice, beans, falafel, and hummus
      • Souper Bowl Day – collect dry soup, canned soup, crackers, and canned meals
      • Cinco de Mayo Day – collect foods celebrating the Mexican culture such as rice, beans, and tomato products
      • Healthy Snack Day – collect healthy after school snacks such as juices, granola bars, fruit cups, and applesauce
      • Turkey in a Bag Day – each classroom could pool pennies or dollars and get enough to buy one frozen turkey for a family (or canned turkey), then deliver it in a grocery bag.
    • Have a “personal products drive,” collecting shampoo, soap, and deodorant for a homeless shelter.
    • Find out if there is a children’s “school room” at the homeless shelter. Include needed school items for children in the collection. Create cards of support for the children.
    • Collect books or games for a shelter, WIC office, or other social service agency that would have children in a waiting room.
    • Lead students to brainstorm how they would define volunteer, and then have them use references to look up the term. Record definitions on the board, poster paper, or an overhead/video display.
    • Lead students to participate in a “Build a Volunteer” activity. Working in pairs, have students trace the outline of their partners and then label the tracing with characteristics that an effective volunteer would need. Tracings may be made using a large roll of white butcher paper. Give as little instruction as needed and allow students to use their own creativity. Lead students to share and explain their drawings. Following the activity, display the finished products-possibly in the school hallway.
    • Have students participate in the Building Empathy exercise (Elderly section) found at http://ccfcs.org/Service%20Learning/documents/2BuildingEmpathy.pdf
      After the activity discuss how this relates to serving senior citizens.
    • How did you feel?
    • What challenges do you see that the elderly face every day?
    • How can we help the elderly with some of their challenges?
    • Why would an elderly person feel frustrated?
    • Were you frustrated and how did you deal with it?

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. (2004). Family and community services I and II. Lubbock: Texas Tech University.

    Websites

    • Amizade
      Amizade is the brainchild of founder Daniel Weiss; it is the product of hundreds of service-learning pioneers who have engaged in almost two decades of programmatic and academic development
      www.amizade.org
    • CHOICE Humanitarian
      CHOICE Humanitarian is about people. With support from our donors and partners, we connect motivated villages to resources and tools that allow villagers to change their lives.
      http://www.choicehumanitarian.org
    • Global Volunteers
      You can be significant in ways you’ve never before imagined! Join a team of short-term volunteers contributing to long-term, comprehensive community projects on a volunteer vacation abroad or a USA volunteer program.
      http://www.globalvolunteers.org/volunteerabroad.htm
    • Habitat For Humanity – International Global Village Program
      They are a nonprofit, ecumenical Christian ministry founded on the conviction that every man, woman and child should have a decent, safe and affordable place to live. We build with people in need regardless of race or religion. We welcome volunteers and supporters from all backgrounds.
      http://www.habitat.org/gv

    Here are some sites that have more information about family volunteering:

    • Points of Light Foundation
      Through four innovative and dynamic enterprises, Points of Light helps put people at the center of transforming their communities.
      http://www.pointsoflight.org
    • United We Serve
      Have an idea for a service project – like getting a group together to volunteer each week at a homeless shelter, or reading to kids at your local library? Learn how to turn your volunteer idea into a successful service project using our do-it-yourself toolkits.
      http://www.serve.gov/toolkits.asp

    YouTube™

    • What Are You Doing for Others?
      This year will mark the 25th anniversary of the Martin Luther King Jr. federal holiday. This milestone is a perfect opportunity for Americans to advance Dr. King’s dream by joining with their community to serve others, and by making an ongoing commitment to serve throughout the year.
      http://youtu.be/bnfClMe8_kw
    • Why is Volunteering Important
      Volunteering to help others can be wonderful way of giving and loving others.
      http://youtu.be/flyiGMNGQyA
    • Volunteers are Beautiful
      Volunteers are beautiful, as this new PSA from VolunteerMatch shows. We’re proud to support the amazing efforts of volunteers and the nonprofits they work with.
      http://youtu.be/eRL5mxkrOdM

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The first and biggest benefit people get from volunteering is the satisfaction of incorporating service into their lives and making a difference in their community and country. when we share our time and talents we:

    • a. solve problems and strengthen communities
    • b. improve lives and connect to others
    • c. transform our own lives
    • d. all of the above

    2. Over the past two decades, we have seen a growing body of research that indicates volunteering provides individual _________ benefits in addition to social benefits.

    • a. monetary
    • b. academic
    • c. health
    • d. status

    3. Some of these findings also indicate that volunteers who devote a “considerable” amount of time to volunteer activities (about _____ hours per year) are most likely to exhibit positive health outcomes.

    • a. 100-125
    • b. 250
    • c. 175
    • d. 100

    4. President George H.W. Bush created the ____________________ to administer grants to schools to support service-learning in schools, higher education institutions, and community-based organizations and support full-time service across the nation.

    • a. Commission on Natural and Community Service
    • b. VISTA (Volunteers in Service to America)
    • c. Commission on National and Community Service
    • d. USA Freedom Corps

    5. Every year, governors and State Service Commissions distribute more than $250 million dollars from federal national service funds, which in turn leverage more than _____ million in local funding to support citizen service and volunteering in America.

    • a. $124
    • b. $100
    • c. $300
    • d. $200

  • III. Academic Applications

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student applies rigorous academic standards in implementing community service activities. The student is expected to:

    • (A) use effective reading strategies to evaluate topics from professional publications in family and community services
    • (B) listen actively and effectively in all communication situations and
    • (C) define the concept of socialization and analyze the role socialization plays in human development and behavior
  • (2) The student demonstrates organizational and leadership skills using a community service environment. The student is expected to:

    • (F) plan and deliver focused and coherent presentations that convey clear and distinct perspective and demonstrate solid reasoning

    Module Content

    Academic Applications is the third unit of study in the Family and Community Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Communication Skills
    • B. Socialization
    • C. Presentation Skills

    Refer to lesson Serving Those Who Serve for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-those-who-serve

    Refer to lesson Serving Senior Citizens for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-seniors-connecting-our-past-to-the-future

    Refert to lesson Focus on Serving Children – Our Future for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/focus-on-serving-children-our-future

    Refer to lesson Count Me In for resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/count-me-in

    Refer to lesson Follow the Leader for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/follow-the-leader

    Refer to lesson What’s Next? Future Trends in Family and Community Services for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/whats-next-future-trends-in-family-and-community-services

    Module Three handouts

    Communications Skills

    Community service supports school-based activities that get youth involved in their communities. Young people become involved in service as a means of not only helping others, but also of enriching their academic learning experience, fostering personal growth, and developing the skills needed to become productive citizens. Community service goes beyond aiding those in need. It emphasizes the educational value of experience-based learning and thoughtful reflection on the service activity. Community service allows students to apply personal experience to academic knowledge.

    How Does It Affect The School?
    Through community service, the doors of communication open between students, teachers and administrators. They all work together to set goals, designate responsibilities and create strategic plan. Within the realm of community service, the students create programs that interest them and help others. The teachers then act as facilitators of the ideas generated by the students. Administrators continue the communication process by interacting with the students on a one-to-one basis.

    This communication and interaction creates an environment within the school that is caring, positive and beneficial to everyone involved. Stronger, more understanding relationships are formed between students and teachers. Administrator and community leaders see youngsters doing things that benefit society.

    Socialization

    The process by which people learn characteristics of their group’s norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors is called socialization. We have to learn all the differences of proper behavior, how to meet expectations for what is expected of them, and everything else needed to become a member of society from the time we are born. By interaction with our family and friends, we usually acquire our socialization skills by the time we reach young adulthood. By being involved with community service, students become active participants within their communities. Their efforts address and meet local needs in the areas of education, public safety, human service and the environment.

    Community service brings community leaders and schools closer together and contributes to a higher quality of life for everyone. By working as a team, our youth, our schools, and our communities benefit.

    What Community Service Does

    • Identifies and researches local needs or issues
    • Combines academic curriculum with service
    • Invites collaboration with school and community-based organizations
    • Motivates students to make a difference in their communities
    • Encourages students to think about and address real-life situations
    • Develops responsible citizens
    • Fosters a sense of caring for others

    Presentation Skills

    The student must demonstrate organizational and leadership skills using a community service environment. The student is expected to plan and deliver focused and coherent presentations that convey clear and distinct perspective and demonstrate solid reasoning. When planning a presentation, it is important to consider several questions such as the following:

    1. What type of representation of your community service project do you want to present?
    Many factors influence the representation of your community service project. The presentation should be targeted to your audience and explain how your project is going to be beneficial to the community.

    2. What audience do you want to reach?
    The public relations strategy should consider which families, students, business owners, or groups of people you want to reach. If your community service project is based on teaching elementary students the importance of Stranger Danger, usually young families are a prime target for getting support for your project.

    3. What is the purpose of the presentation?
    It is important to consider what you want to accomplish through this strategy.

    • Are you trying to build support?
    • Are you trying to gain financial support?
    • Are you trying to increase your membership to your CTSO?
    • Do you want to be viewed as a source of information and resources?

    4. What information do you want to share with your audience?

    • Do you want to communicate your CTSO’s philosophy, goals and purpose?
    • Do you want to share how the project benefits school, teachers, administrators and students?
    • Do you want to share how the project serves the community?

    5. What is the best way to communicate the information to the audience?

    • Articles
    • Brochures
    • Creative writing and journaling
    • Essays and expert projects
    • Handouts
    • Multimedia projects
    • Newsletter
    • Newspaper
    • PowerPoint™ slide presentation
    • Prezi™ Presentation
    • Visual & musical arts
    • Speeches, skits, drama
    • Survey

    Keep in mind, your presentation must have these three components:

    • opening-something that makes an emotional connection with the audience.
    • a body-try to have three important points to discuss.
    • the closing of your presentation should leave the audience something to think about. You can mention the slogan for your project and say a positive outcome of the project.
      Above all, practice, practice, practice!!

    After completion of the community service project, it is important to evaluate the value of it.

    • What did we learn? What can we do next?
    • How can this be shared with others?
    • Were we organized?
    • Were the responsibilities of the project leaders outlined?
    • How realistic were the expectations of this project?
    • Did this project utilize collaboration of students, teachers and the community?
    • What might you do differently next time?
    • What did you gain from this experience and contribution including both in learning and in the service?
    • Do they feel they made an impact with the students, school and the community?

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module Three handouts

    • Curriculum Ideas for Connecting Community Service with Learning
    • Delivering an Effective Speech
    • Develop Your Media Skills
    • Getting the Word Out
    • Nine PR Tools
    • Public Relations Basics
    • What is Newsworthy?

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Provide students with copies of Curriculum Ideas for Connecting Community Service with Learning. Students will complete chart by writing ideas to connect community service with learning.
    • Provide students with copies of Public Relations Basics. Lead them to analyze the steps shown for conducting a public relations campaign.
    • Have students, working in groups, follow steps to develop a simple example of a public relations campaign for a real or fictional service organization. Provide copies of Getting the Word Out and Nine PR Tools to use in developing their plan for disseminating information.
    • Provide students with copies of Develop Your Media Skills. Divide the topics among students or pairs for further research and development into a class presentation. Have students provide examples of appropriate media, such as a sample sheet, news release, or opinion article.
    • Lead students to discuss What is Newsworthy? Have students look in newspapers or Internet for articles that fall within each category. Lead students to develop a visual display of examples for each category. Have them include, or focus on, examples of articles related to volunteerism and community service.
    • Have students practice writing various media submissions, such as a media advisory, news release, PSA, or op-ed pieces. Refer to Develop Your Media Skills for information and additional resource suggestions. When appropriate, guide students to submit actual articles promoting Family and Community Services course, benefits of community service, or specific volunteer agencies and events.
    • Provide students with a copy of Delivering an Effective Speech. Assign students to develop and present a speech about a volunteer agency or event. Guide them to determine possible groups for gaining speaking experience, such as school staff; parents’ organizations and booster clubs; school boards; civic organizations; Chamber of Commerce; and senior citizens’ groups.
    • If the community has a local newspaper, arrange for acknowledging a weekly or monthly “Volunteer of the Week” with a highlight of the class member and the service provided.
    • Habitat for Humanity-Secondary curriculum. This program allows students in grades 9–12 to uncover information about the social, economic, geographic, and political causes surrounding poverty, housing, and homelessness. As part of the focus of these materials, students must take this information and apply it to real-life, higher-order problem solving scenarios, in which they make recommendations for change, advocate for the rights and needs of others, make informed decisions as members of a global community, and analyze the special geographic and cultural needs of people around the world.
      http://www.habitat.org/youthprograms
    • Discuss the importance of effective communication skills when gathering information on the telephone. Pose the following questions:
      • What is the proper way to introduce yourself?
      • How do you clarify who you are and what you want?
      • How do you handle negative responses?
      • How do you politely close a conversation?
    • Have students create a survey on SurveyMonkey about community needs, send it via email to friends and family members, and analyze data as responses are received.
      http://www.surveymoneky.com

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. (2004). Family and community services I and II. Lubbock: Texas Tech University.

    Websites

    • Habitat for Humanity
      This program allows students in grades 9–12 to uncover information about the social, economic, geographic, and political causes surrounding poverty, housing, and homelessness.
      http://www.habitat.org/youthprograms
    • National Service-Learning Clearinghouse
      Service-Learning is a teaching and learning strategy that integrates meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.
      https://gsn.nylc.org/clearinghouse

    YouTube™

    • The Service-Learning YouTube™ Channel
      Are you looking for innovative ways to help young people become engaged learners and active citizens? Then channel surf no more! Welcome to Service-Learning YouTube—your one-stop channel for examples, stories, and ideas to help young people learn and change their communities through service.
      http://www.youtube.com/user/servicelearning?feature=relchannel

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Young people become involved in service as a means of not only helping others, but also of enriching their ______________experience, fostering personal growth, and developing the skills needed to become productive citizens.

    • a. career
    • b. academic learning
    • c. family
    • d. family service

    2. Through community service, the doors of communication open between students, teachers and administrators. They all work together to _________, designate responsibilities, and ______________.

    • a. set goals
    • b. identify family strengths
    • c. create strategic plan
    • d. a and c

    3. The process by which people learn characteristics of their group’s norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors is called _______________.

    • a. sociability
    • b. socialism
    • c. socialization
    • d. social science

    4. What is the purpose of community service?

    • a. Invites collaboration with school and community-based organizations
    • b. Motivates students to make a difference in their communities
    • c. Encourages students to think about and address real-life situations
    • d. All of the above

    5. Your presentation must have three parts to it: an opening, a ________-try to have three important points to discuss and the closing of your presentation should leave the audience something to think about.

    • a. bold statement
    • b. body
    • c. bonding statement
    • d. boastful statement

  • IV. Careers in Family Service

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student explores careers in family services. The student is expected to:

    • (A) identify family services
    • (B) investigate career options available that focus on families
    • (C) research to find agencies, organizations, and churches offering family services in the student’s area and
    • (D) analyze demographic and community needs
  • Module Content

    Careers in Family Service is the fourth unit of study in the Family and Community Services course. This section contains two TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Needs
    • B. Applications

    Refer to lesson We Serve – An Introduction to Service Learning for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/we-serve-an-introduction-to-service-learning

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Family and Community Services for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-family-and-community-services

    Module IV Handouts

    Needs

    What career do you see in your future? What education do you need for this career? How much money will you make? What skills will you need? There are many different careers in the Family and Community Services field.
    The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH)—updated every 2 years by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—is a career guide that describes, for hundreds of occupations:

    • What workers do on the job
    • Work environment
    • The education and training and other qualifications needed to enter the occupation
    • Pay
    • Expected employment change and job prospects
    • Similar occupations
    • Contacts for more information

    Job Outlook for Careers in Family and Community Services:

    • Employment of social and community service managers is expected to grow by 27 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected because increases in the aging population, increases in demand for substance abuse treatment, and overall population growth.
    • Employment of health educators is expected to grow by 37 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be driven by efforts to reduce healthcare costs by teaching people about healthy habits and behaviors. Employment of health educators is expected to grow by 37 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be driven by efforts to reduce healthcare costs by teaching people about healthy habits and behaviors.
    • Employment of mental health counselors is expected to grow by 36 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Employment of marriage and family therapists is expected to grow by 41 percent from 2010 to 2020, much faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as the overall population grows and as insurance companies increasingly provide for reimbursement of counselors and marriage and family therapists as a less costly alternative to psychiatrists and psychologists.
    • Employment of probation officers and correctional treatment specialists is expected to grow by 18 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as average for all occupations. Continued growth in the demand for probation and parole services will lead to new openings for officers.
    • Employment of rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow with the increase in the elderly population and with the continued rehabilitation needs of other groups, such as veterans and people with disabilities.
    • Employment of school and career counselors is expected to grow by 19 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. The number of students attending schools at all levels is expected to increase during the projections decade, boosting demand for both school and career counselors.
    • Employment of social and human service assistants is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. There should be good job prospects, as low pay and heavy workloads cause many workers to leave this occupation.
    • Employment of social workers is expected to grow by 25 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will be due to an increase in demand for health care and social services but will vary by specialty.
    • Employment of substance abuse and behavioral disorder counselors is expected to grow by 27 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as more people seek treatment for their addictions or other behaviors and drug offenders are increasingly sentenced to treatment rather than jail time.
    • Employment of sociologists is expected to grow 18 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. However, jobseekers should face competition for most positions because of the relatively small size of the occupation.
    • Employment of postsecondary teachers is expected to grow by 17 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as enrollments at postsecondary institutions at all levels continue to rise.
    • Employment of political scientists is expected to grow 8 percent from 2010 to 2020, slower than the average for all occupations. Employment will increase in response to a growing interest in public policy and political issues. However, because the number of students graduating with degrees in political science is growing, candidates should face strong competition for most positions.

    The O*NET Interest Profiler can helped students find out what their interests were and how they relate to the world of work. It will also help them decide what kinds of careers they might want to explore. There are six interest areas:

    • Realistic
    • Investigative
    • Artistic
    • Social
    • Enterprising
    • Conventional

    Careers in Human Services cluster under Family and Community Services:

    • Chief Executives
    • Family, and School Social Workers
    • Childcare Workers
    • City and Regional Planning Aides
    • Clergy
    • Counselors, All Other
    • Directors, Religious Activities and Education
    • Eligibility Interviewers, Government Programs
    • Emergency Management Directors
    • Farm and Home Management Advisor
    • Healthcare Social Workers
    • Home Economics Teachers, Postsecondary
    • Legislators
    • Managers, All Other
    • Marriage and Family Therapists
    • Political Scientists
    • Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists
    • Protective Service Workers, All Other
    • Residential Advisors
    • Social and Community Service Managers
    • Social and Human Service Assistants
    • Sociologists
    • Social Science Research Assistants
    • Social Scientists and Related Workers, All
    • Social Work Teachers, Postsecondary
    • Social Workers, All Other

    Applications

    Among the many reasons that people volunteer, its ability to act as a bridge to paid employment is one that many people find attractive. Some professions, such as social work, will not consider candidates who have not demonstrated their commitment to the field by undertaking some form of relevant voluntary activity. For others, voluntary work can provide training and experience without which they would be ill equipped to compete in the open employment market.
    While it can happen that a paid post becomes available in the organization with which you are volunteering, it would be unwise to join on the basis that you hope this might happen. It would be more realistic to look upon your time as a volunteer as an opportunity to strengthen your existing skills and develop new ones, and to find out whether or not a particular kind of work is suited for you. Volunteering can also help you to prepare for paid employment by:

    • providing good quality training, some of which carries nationally recognized qualifications
    • enabling you to maintain existing skills, acquire new ones, and identify which are transferable between sectors
    • building your confidence about being able to operate in a work context
    • helping you to remain active and involved in something while seeking work (which can be isolating)
    • allowing you to gain insight into how voluntary and community organizations operate
    • providing you with a source of up-to-date, relevant references to offer to prospective employers

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module IV Handouts

    • Human Services Browse by Career Cluster
    • Human Services Career Wanted
    • I Have – Who Has Activity
    • Mock Interview Practice
    • Mock Interview Practice (Key)
    • PR Career Exploration Internet Activity
    • Rubric for a Local Agency, Organization or Church Poster
    • Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display
    • Social and Community Services Manager
    • Telephone Interview Record
    • Ups and Downs of Careers in Human Services
    • We Serve – An Introduction to Service Learning Notes
    • Where Do You Look

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Human Services for additional ideas and resources.
      http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-human-services-2/
    • Students will list the advantages and challenges of employment in Human Services and answer the questions on Ups and Downs of Careers in Human Services
    • View the Achieve Texas Media Component for Human Services.
      http://www.achievetexas.org/_media/00-0000.10-10.mpg”
    • Students will visit http://www.bls.gov/ooh/community-and-social-service/home.htm
      Occupational Outlook Handbook to investigate the nature of the work, working conditions and employment, training, other qualifications, and advancement, and job outlook using PR Career Exploration Internet Activity.
    • Distribute graphic organizer Human Services Career Wanted and explain to students to choose one of the Programs of Study Models they may be interested in as a career. Allow them to document the career from the bottom level to the top. Explain, of course, that any level attained is to be congratulated but to always be prepared for the top. Give examples.
    • Distribute Human Services Browse by Career Cluster and discuss all the careers related to each cluster focusing on Family and Community Services.
    • Distribute Social and Community Services Manager. It is a Cluster Overview for preparing individuals for employment in career pathways that relate to families and human needs.  Review suggested coursework, on-the-job training opportunities, certificates, and post-secondary sequence.
    • Students will create a Career Poster on a career in Family and Community Service. The poster should include an image of the career and the following information:
      • Tasks
      • Tools and Technology
      • Knowledge
      • Skills
      • Abilities
      • Work Activities
      • Job Zone
      • Education
      • Interest Code
      • Work Styles
      • Work Values
      • Wages and Employment Trends
    • Students can present their Career Poster to the class. Presentations will be assessed with rubric Rubric for Career Poster Visual Display.
    • Option: Display the Career Posters on a wall outside your classroom so that students may view the possible careers in Human Services.

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • Kelly, Joan and Eubanks, Eddye. Today’s Teen. Mission Hills, CA: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 1988. Print.
    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. (2004). Family and community services I and II. Lubbock: Texas Tech University.

    Websites

    • CTE: Making the Difference CTE is leading positive change in secondary, postsecondary and adult education, with innovative programs that are making a difference nationwide. http://vimeo.com/26926766
    • National Youth Leadership Council
      Information for students and educator on service-learning practices
      http://www.nylc.org/
    • O*NET OnLine Detailed descriptions of the world of work for use by job seekers, workforce development and HR professionals, students, researchers, and more!
      http://www.onetonline.org/
    • The Texas Work Prep Learning Management System (LMS) designed and hosted by the Texas Workforce Commission. The Job Hunter’s Guide Course – This course will allow the student to gain knowledge and skills to attain employment. The course is approximately an hour and a half long. Students will receive a certificate upon completion of this course. Certificate can be printed and added to their professional portfolio.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH)—updated every two years by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—is a career guide that describes, for hundreds of occupations:

    • a. What workers do on the job
    • b. Work environment
    • c. The education and training and other qualifications needed to enter the occupation
    • d. All of the above

    2. Job Outlook for employment of social and community service managers is expected to grow by __________ from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected because increases in the aging population, increases in demand for substance abuse treatment, and overall population growth.

    • a. 25 percent
    • b. 28 percent
    • c. 27 percent
    • d. 29 percent

    3. Employment of rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow because:

    • a. drug offenders are increasingly sentenced to treatment rather than jail time
    • b. the increase in the elderly population
    • c. the continued rehabilitation needs of other groups, such as veterans and people with disabilities.
    • d. both b and c

    4. It would be more realistic to look upon your time as a volunteer as:

    • a. an opportunity to strengthen your existing skills
    • b. develop new skills
    • c. to find out whether or not a particular kind of work is suited for you
    • d. all of the above

    5. Volunteering can also help you to prepare for paid employment by:

    • a. building your confidence about being able to operate in a work context
    • b. allowing you to gain insight into how voluntary and community organizations operate
    • c. teaching people about healthy habits and behaviors
    • d. a and b

  • V. Personal Employability Skills/Career Resources

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student analyzes factors influencing employability skills. The student is expected to:

    • (A) evaluate interests, abilities, and personal priorities related to career choices
    • (B) apply the decision-making process to career selection
    • (C) demonstrate effective verbal, nonverbal, and written communication skills
    • (D) demonstrate positive human relations skills
    • (E) demonstrate appropriate grooming, appearance, and etiquette for volunteer activities
    • (F) exhibit ethical practices as defined for designated volunteer activities;
    • (G) describe community service experiences that contribute to career preparation
    • (H) analyze future trends in community service
    • (I) determine employment and entrepreneurial opportunities related to community service and
    • (J) design a public relations campaign promoting volunteer activities
  • Module Content

    Personal Employability Skills/Career Resources is the fifth unit of study in the Family and Community Services course. This section contains three TEA units of study that include:

    • A. Interpersonal Skills
    • B. Management Practices
    • C. Problem Solving

    Refer to lesson Exploring Careers in Family and Community Services for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/exploring-careers-in-family-and-community-services

    Refer to lesson Serving Those Who Serve for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-those-who-serve

    Refer to lesson Serving Senior Citizens for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/serving-seniors-connecting-our-past-to-the-future

    Refert to lesson Focus on Serving Children – Our Future for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/focus-on-serving-children-our-future

    Refer to lesson Count Me In for resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/count-me-in

    Refer to lesson What’s Next? Future Trends in Family and Community Services for additional resources, ideas and activities.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/whats-next-future-trends-in-family-and-community-services

    Module V Handouts

    Interpersonal Skills

    The 17 Foundation Skills are those required of all workers in the high-performance workplace of the 21st century. They were developed from several high-level government commission reports. A corporate vice president and director at Motorola, Jim Burge, wrote this,

    “At my company, Motorola, the only constant is change. Jobs that were once relatively simple now require high-performance work processes and enhanced skills. Today’s job skills, identified by Professor Lawrence Jones in Job Skills for the 21st Century, reflect these changing workplace realities and help students, job applicants, and employees anticipate change.”

    There are four groups of Foundation Skills:

    Basic Skills

    • Reading: Identify relevant details, facts, and specification; locate information in books/manuals, from graphs; find meaning of unknown words; judge accuracy of reports; use computer to find information.

    • Writing: Write ideas completely and accurately in letters and reports with proper grammar, spelling, and punctuation; check, edit, and revise for accuracy and emphasis, use computer to communicate information.

    • Mathematics: Use numbers, fractions, and percentages to solve problems; use tables, graphs, diagrams, and charts; use computer to enter, retrieve, change, and communicate numerical information.

    • Speaking: Organize and communicate ideas clearly; speak clearly; select language, tone of voice, and gestures appropriate to audience.

    • Listening: Listen carefully to what person says, noting tone of voice, and other body language; respond in a way that shows understanding of what is said.

    Thinking Skills

    • Creative Thinking: Use imagination freely, combining ideas or information in new ways; make connections between ideas that seem unrelated.

    • Problem-Solving Skills: Recognize problem; identify why it is a problem; create and implement a solution; watch to see how well solution works; revise as needed.

    • Decision Making Skills: Identify goal; generate alternatives and gather information about them; weigh pros and cons; choose best alternative; plan how to carry out choice.

    • Visualization: See a building or object by looking at a blueprint, drawing, or sketch; imagine how a system works by looking at a schematic drawing.

    People Skills

    • Social: Show understanding, friendliness, and respect for feelings; assert oneself when appropriate; take an interest in what people say and why they think and act as they do.

    • Negotiation: Identify common goals among different parties in conflict; clearly present the facts and arguments of your position; listen to and understand other party’s position; create possible ways to resolve conflict; make reasonable compromises.

    • Leadership: Communicate thoughts and feelings to justify a position; encourage or convince others; make positive use of rules or values; demonstrate ability to have others believe in and trust you because of your competence and honesty.

    • Teamwork: Work cooperatively with others; contribute to group with ideas and effort; do own share of work; encourage team members; resolve differences for the benefit of the team; responsibly challenge existing procedures, policies, or authorities.

    • Cultural Diversity: Work well with people having different ethnic, social, or educational backgrounds; understand the concerns of members of other ethnic and gender groups; base impressions on a person’s behavior, not stereotypes; understand one’s own culture and those of others and how they differ; respectfully help people in these groups make cultural adjustments when necessary.

    Personal Qualities

    • Self-Esteem: Understand how beliefs affect how a person feels and acts; “listen” to and identify irrational or harmful beliefs you may have; and understand how to change these negative beliefs when they occur.
    • Self-Management: Assess your knowledge and skills accurately; set specific, realistic personal goals; monitor progress toward your goal.
    • Responsibility: Work hard to reach goals, even if task is unpleasant; do quality work; display high standard of attendance, honesty, energy, and optimism.

    Management Practices

    Management involves five basic functions:

    • Planning
    • Organizing
    • Implementing
    • Evalulating
    • Communicating

    Planning

    • Planning is thinking that occurs before action is taken. Planning comes first. Planning involves decisions about how to go about achieving goals and objectives, Another way to describe planning is that it answers the questions what, why, when, where, how, and by whom.
    • Step One: Setting goals and objectives
      Setting goals and objectives is the first step in planning. Goals tell where an organization hopes to be in the future. An advisor to a CTSO such as FCCLA may have a program goal to develop a well-known and respected program by the end of two years. Goals are sometimes considered a finishing point, but actually the achievement of one goal calls for new goals to be developed. For this reason, goals should be thought of as checkpoints along the way.
      Objectives:
      Are more specific statements related to a goal. Objectives tell the exact behavior and the activity to be achieved. For example: the FCCLA advisor who desires a well-known and respected program might have some of the following objectives:
    • Increase enrollment in Family and Consumer Sciences classes by 20%.
    • Have students apply for STAR event competitions at the regional and state level.
    • Hold an open house for parents, school administrators and new FCCLA members to become familiar with the program and the year’s goals and objectives.
      Such objectives clearly show the action to be taken. In addition, goals and objectives provide the basis for evaluation.

    • Step Two: Assessing Resources
      The second step involved in planning is assessing what resources are needed to achieve the stated objectives. Resources include materials, people, services, and time. If enough resources are not available to accomplish a certain objective, the objective may need revision.
    • Step Three: Determining Sequence of Activities
      The third step in planning is determining a sequence of activities. Charts, lists, and tables are useful for this task. These items help show the sequence of events and time involved in achieving the objectives.
    • Step Four: Decision Making
      The final step in planning is decision making. In planning, several courses of action may be considered. In decision making, the advisor carefully thinks about strengths and weaknesses of each course of action and then chooses the best plan.
      Decision making must also be used to form goals and objectives. In this way, decisions are based on what is most important at the time. For example, an advisor may have several projects to be done but not enough resources. A decision is made about projects. Resources are then used for projects in order of priority. Decision-making skills play an important role in planning as well as in the other functions of management.

    Organization

    When managing, organization involves setting lines of authority and communication, assigning tasks, and motivating students. People are the main focus. Lines of authority and communication may be pictured on an organizational chart. Assigning tasks means giving out job responsibilities. Tasks to be done are identified in the planning stage. After this, tasks are assigned to members of the organization. People perform their jobs better when they are motivated. Motivation is energy that causes people to do the best possible jobs they can. People tend to be motivated when they are involved in planning and organizing, As an advisor, allow the students to do the planning and organizing with direct supervision and guidance from you. Communication plays a key role in motivation. Once people are motivated, assigned to tasks, plans are ready to be implemented.

    Implementation

    Putting a plan into action and ensuring progress is known as implementation. Project managers direct the activities of those members assigned to a particular project or job. Once activities are in motion, the project manager should obtain feedback from members about their work. In this way changes can be made when necessary. The ongoing communication between advisor and members leads to evaluation.

    Evaluation

    Evaluation answers questions concerning the degree to which the objectives have been reached, how well tasks have been performed, and how well people measure up to goals.
    Evauation is based on goals and objectives set in the planning stage. Evaluation can occur in different forms and at different times in a program. Evaluations should result in improved performance or a change in plans. In this way, evaluating leads back to planning.

    Communication

    The first four management functions—planning, organizing, implementing, and evaluating—might be four points around a circle. The management function of communication is the line between each of these points. In other words, communication connects the other management functions together. Communication is a process in which information is shared. Between two people, messages are sent and received. Messages are both verbal and nonverbal. Some guidelines for effective communication are as follows:

    • think first
    • choose words carefully
    • speak clearly
    • be specific
    • be positive
    • encourage feedback
    • be a good listener
    • use touch wisely
    • develop effective writing skills
    • observe body language

    Problem Solving

    Disagreements between people are likely to occur on occasion. The teacher and school administrators set policies and procedures for dealing with such problems.
    The first step in dealing with differences is to admit they happen. Having a difference of opinion is not a reflection of a teacher’s skill or competence. Competence comes from thinking through differences and deciding on a plan to handle them.
    A key to resolving differences is knowing how to respond to a problem with a student. Here are some tips for dealing with problems:

    • Be grateful that students feel comfortable enough to present complaints and suggestions openly.
    • Listen to feelings as well as words.
    • Hear students out. They have a right to make suggestions about a possible solution to the problem.
    • Try not to get emotional.

    Handouts/Graphic Organizers

    Module V Handouts

    • Article Evaluation
    • Community Service: Demonstrating Communication Skills
    • Communication Words to Know
    • Constructive Conflict Resolution
    • Dietitian
    • Exploring Careers in Family and Community Services Notes
    • Exploring Careers in Family and Community Services Notes (Key)
    • Family and Community Services ONet Flashcards
    • FCCLA Planning Process
    • Geriatric Care Manager
    • Influences on Effective Communication
    • Methods Used to Resolve Conflicts
    • Rubric for Family and Community Services Career Glogster™Edu
    • Rubric for Family and Community Services Career Poster
    • Social and Community Services Manager
    • Steps in Conflict Resolution
    • The Communication Process

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Students will choose three newspaper or Internet articles using Article Evaluation that are the result of conflict situations. Summarize each report and identify from the list on the handout at least two situations that may have contributed to each conflict.
    • Have students complete Community Service: Demonstrating Communication Skills for each community service experience through which they demonstrated skill in communicating with others. Be sure they work closely with the teacher in planning, implementing, and evaluating each community service experience.
    • Lead students to brainstorm situations that can lead to conflict using handout Situations that Encourage Conflict and discuss each of the situations.
    • Lead students to analyze constructive and destructive methods for resolving conflict, such as those presented in the following handouts: Methods Used to Resolve Conflicts and Constructive Conflict Resolution
    • Lead students to define communication. Discuss verbal and nonverbal messages that might be used. Have students take notes using The Communication Process
    • Provide students with copies of Communication Words to Know and ask them to give examples of each term.
    • Have students work in groups or pairs to analyze how the following factors influence communication:
      • feelings
      • environment
      • perception
      • body language
      • situations
      • location
      • past experiences
      • culture
    • Lead students to share and discuss their group findings using handout Influences of Effective Communication
    • Use the Would You Rather assessment instrument found at http://ccfcs.org/Service%20Learning/documents/5PersonalAssessment.pdf
      Use the following questions after the assessment:
    • What strengths do you have that would help you work with veterans and their families?
    • What scares you about working with veterans?
    • Do you know any veterans?

    References and Resources

    Textbooks

    • The Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences. (2004). Family and community services I and II. Lubbock: Texas Tech University.

    Websites

    • Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook
      on the Internet
      http://www.bls.gov/

    Videos

    YouTube™

    • How to Succeed in the Workplace Russ Mitchell and Rebecca Jarvis discuss ways to become a professional success with CBS News financial contributor Carmen Wong Ulrich.
      http://youtu.be/v4btmhXVXZo

    Family and Community Services: Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The ________ Foundation Skills are those required of all workers in the high-performance workplace of the 21st century. They were developed from several high-level government commission reports.

    • a. 16
    • b. 17
    • c. 18
    • d. 19

    2. Use imagination freely, combining ideas or information in new ways; making connections between ideas that seem unrelated is called________.

    • a. problem-solving skills
    • b. visualization
    • c. negotiation
    • d. creative thinking

    3. Communicate thoughts and feelings to justify a position; encourage or convince others; make positive use of rules or values; demonstrate ability to have others believe in and trust you because of your competence and honesty is called _____________.

    • a. visualization
    • b. leadership
    • c. teamwork
    • d. cultural diversity

    4. Management involves all the following basic functions except one:

    • a. planning
    • b. implementing
    • c. leadership
    • d. evaluating

    5. The first step in dealing with differences among students is to:

    • a. take sides immediately
    • b. refuse to listen and punish both sides
    • c. admit they happen
    • d. ignore them and let the students work it out

  • Quiz

    Family and Community Services Online Course

    Progress:

    1. TEKS stands for

    2. CTE stands for

    3. Students can earn _____________credits in the Family and Community Services course.

    4. This course is recommended for students in grades 11-12. The recommended prerequisite is___________.

    5. This ____________ course is designed to involve students in realistic and meaningful community-based activities through direct service experiences.

    6. Emphasis in this course is placed on developing and enhancing __________ and __________ skills and characteristics.

    7. The suggested scope and sequence for this course is divided into ___________sections.

    8. CTE equips students with

    9. There are _____________ Career Clusters.

    10. Students taking this course will be able to pursue careers in careers in_________.

    11. All successful leaders possess certain leadership skills. Leaders who possess these traits have the ability to work in a professional manner. These traits include all the following except one:

    12. In 2011, the number of volunteers reached its highest level in five years, as__________ million Americans volunteered through an organization, an increase of 1.5 million from 2010.

    13. A majority of Americans assisted their neighbors in some way and more than a third actively participated in a civic, religious, or___________ group.

    14. _____________ means identifying with and being concerned about other people’s feelings and needs.

    15. A person with______________ is one who is willing and able to observe tasks that need to be done and complete them without being told to do so. A willingness to learn is also a sign of this trait. The person is also eager to learn will ask about opportunities for growth and learning.

    16. The first and biggest benefit people get from volunteering is the satisfaction of incorporating service into their lives and making a difference in their community and country. When we share our time and talents we:

    17. Over the past two decades we have seen a growing body of research that indicates volunteering provides individual _________ benefits in addition to social benefits.

    18. Some of these findings also indicate that volunteers who devote a “considerable” amount of time to volunteer activities (about _____ hours per year) are most likely to exhibit positive health outcomes.

    19. President George H.W. Bush created the ____________________ to administer grants to schools to support service-learning in schools, higher education institutions, and community-based organizations and support full-time service across the nation.

    20. Every year, governors and State Service Commissions distribute more than $250 million dollars from federal national service funds, which in turn leverage more than _____ million in local funding to support citizen service and volunteering in America.

    21. 1930s: At the height of the Great Depression, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the ____________(CCC) as a way to put idle hands to productive use to meet public needs.

    22. Comparisons of the health benefits of volunteering for different age groups have also shown that ________ volunteers are the most likely to receive greater benefits from volunteering, whether because they are more likely to face higher incidence of illness or because volunteering provides them with physical and social activity and a sense of purpose at a time when their social roles are changing.

    23. Young people become involved in service as a means of not only helping others, but also of enriching their ______________experience, fostering personal growth, and developing the skills needed to become productive citizens.

    24. Through community service, the doors of communication open between students, teachers and administrators. They all work together to _________, designate responsibilities, and ______________.

    25. The process by which people learn characteristics of their group’s norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors is called _______________.

    26. What community service does?

    27. Your presentation must have three parts to it: an opening, a ________-try to have three important points to discuss and the closing of your presentation should leave the audience something to think about.

    28. After completion of the community service project, it is important to evaulate the value of it and ask these questions:

    29. Some of the best way to communicate the information to your audience pertaining to your community service project would be:

    30. When planning a presentation, it is important to consider several questions such as the following:

    31. When considering the purpose of the community service presentation, you should ask the following questions:

    32. The Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH )—updated every two years by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—is a career guide that describes, for hundreds of occupations:

    33. Job Outlook for employment of social and community service managers is expected to grow by __________ from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth is expected because increases in the aging population, increases in demand for substance abuse treatment, and overall population growth.

    34. Employment of rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow by 28 percent from 2010 to 2020, faster than the average for all occupations. Demand for rehabilitation counselors is expected to grow because:

    35. It would be more realistic to look upon your time as a volunteer as:

    36. Volunteering can also help you to prepare for paid employment by:

    37. The O*NET Interest Profiler can help students find out what their interests are and how they relate to the world of work. It will also help them decide what kinds of careers they might want to explore. Some of the six interest areas include:

    38. Employment of postsecondary teachers is expected to grow by ___________ from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Growth is expected as enrollments at postsecondary institutions at all levels continue to rise.

    39. Employment of sociologists is expected to grow 18 percent from 2010 to 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations. However, jobseekers should face competition for most positions because of the relatively _____size of the occupation

    40. Some of the careers in Human Services cluster under Family and Community Services include:

    41. The ________ Foundation Skills are those required of all workers in the high-performance workplace of the 21st century. They were developed from several high-level government commission reports.

    42. Use imagination freely, combining ideas or information in new ways; making connections between ideas that seem unrelated is called________.

    43. Communicate thoughts and feelings to justify a position; encourage or convince others; make positive use of rules or values; demonstrate ability to have others believe in and trust you because of your competence and honesty is called _____________.

    44. Management involves all the following basic functions except one.

    45. The first step in dealing with differences is to

    46. Communication________ the other management functions together. Communication is a process in which information is shared.

    47. Some guidelines for effective communication are:

    48. A key to resolving differences is knowing how to ___________ to a student when problems arise.

    49. Putting a plan into action and ensuring progress is known as ______________________.

    50. ______________plays a key role in motivation. Once people are motivated and assigned to tasks, plans are ready to be implemented.

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