Career Portals Online Course

  • Career Portals Online Course Introduction

    shutterstock_82950805

    Course Learning Objectives

    The objective of this online class is to acquaint CTE teachers with the Career Portals course by providing information that will be of assistance during instructional implementation in the following areas:

    • Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills
    • Scope and Sequence
    • Instructional resources
    • References
    • Suggested teaching strategies

    Students will identify this course as part of a Career and Technical Education (CTE) Program of Study, understand that CTE in Texas is organized around 16 Career Clusters™ and 79 career pathways.

    In addition, there five career development courses that are applicable to all 16 Career Clusters:

    • Career Exploration: Middle School
    • Career Portals: Middle School
    • Career Preparation I: High School
    • Career Preparation II: High School
    • Problems and Solutions: High School

    These CTE courses equips students with:

    • core academic skills
    • employability skills
    • job specific technical skills

    Training Overview

    Welcome to the Career Portals self-paced professional development course. This Career Portals Online Course has specifically been developed for middle school teachers that have a need to focus on Career Clusters in:

    • Education and Training
    • Hospitality and Tourism
    • Human Services

    The suggested scope and sequence of this course is divided into eight modules that may be taught to your students in either a semester or year-long format. Each section will be explored in addition to providing instructors with resources, references and suggested teaching strategies.

    It is important to begin teaching Career Portals (One-Half to One Credit) and all other courses with the end in mind. The state of Texas recommends ending Career Portals with an end of course project. A suggested end of course project lesson plan is located under the Career Development tab on this website.

    In addition to the eight modules of curriculum, time must also be scheduled for the end of course project to be completed during the time allotted for the class. Some school districts will offer this class as a semester course and others will present it in a year-long format. It is vital to the planning process to align each unit with the school calendar to prevent unexpected interruption in curriculum implementation.

    Important

    This online course consists of an introduction and eight modules. Carefully read all course content to become familiar with the TEKS, student expectations, published lessons and suggested activities. Names of handouts, graphic organizers and slide presentations appear in bold letters. Refer to attachments at the end of each module for additional information. Pre-assessment multiple choice statements can be found at the end of the Introduction. Each module ends with additional multiple choice statements.

    After completing the course, you will be required to complete a 50 question quiz and submit your name and email address to receive a certificate of completion.

    The certificates for the successful completion of the online courses are NOT automatically computer generated and are reviewed individually. Certificates will be generated Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00am and 5:00pm.
    For questions, contact: sfacte@gmail.com.

    As approved by the Texas Education Agency, a passing score of 80 is required to receive a certificate equaling six (6) Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

    Refer to the Introduction to Career Portals for an introduction to Career and Technical Education, Career Clusters™, coherent sequence of courses and program of study.
    http://cte.sfasu.edu/lesson-plans/lesson-1-introduction-to-career-portals/

    Career Portal Pre-Assessment Questions:

    1. Career Portals is a course that:

    • a. can be utilized by all Career Clusters
    • b. is strictly for middle school/junior high students
    • c. is a Career and Technical Education course
    • d. all of the above

    2. The Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center focuses on the needs of Texas teachers in the areas of:

    • a. Education and Training
    • b. Hospitality and Tourism
    • c. Human Services
    • d. all of the above

    3. The goals of this course include guiding students as they:

    • a. explore college and career options
    • b. learn job-seeking skills
    • c. explore and set realistic goals
    • d. all of the above

    4. School districts have the flexibility to:

    • a. provide an innovative course into their curriculum
    • b. be creative with scheduling
    • c. offer the course in a variety of instructional arrangements
    • d. hire non-certified teachers

    5. Which of the following statements is correct?

    • a. A Career Portals course can be taught by anyone with a Texas teaching certificate.
    • b. All Career Portals courses can be taught by any CTE certified teacher.
    • c. A Career Portals course may include content from more than one Career Cluster.
    • d. b and c

    6. According to TEA, a Career Portals course must:

    • a. be a year-long course
    • b. be a semester
    • c. must incorporate content from at least two Cluster Courses
    • d. be taught by a content specific certified CTE certified teacher

  • I. Personal Lifestyle Choices

    shutterstock_143045899

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student explores the professional skills needed for college and career success. The student is expected to:

    • (C) develop a personal six- or eight-year achievement plan that incorporates rigorous academic and relevant enrichment courses

    Module Content

    Discovering your personal lifestyle choices is the first module in this online course.

    This section contains two units of study that include:

    • A. Personal Lifestyle Choices
    • B. Lifestyle Choices Budget


    Refer to lessons:

    A. Creating a Personal Lifestyle

    Choices surround us every day, from what to wear in the morning, to what college to go to in the fall. Every choice has a direct and profound effect on one’s life. By exploring personal lifestyle choices, you can discover how the decisions and the choices you make right now can, and will, affect your future.

    Lifestyle Choices
    Lifestyle – A set of attitudes, habits or possessions associated with a particular person or group.

    An individual’s lifestyle choices consist of one’s physical health, family and relationships, education, housing, transportation and career or job. The direction one’s life will take is directly impacted by the choices that are made. Careful planning and attention to decision-making can make a great impact on an individual’s future.

    Decision-Making Model

    1. Define the objective
    2. Determine the choices
    3. Evaluate the choices
    4. Make the decision
    5. Evaluate the decision

    The most important step in the decision-making process is evaluation. Always review choices and decisions to ensure the correct choices were made. If not, repeat the process until the desired results are achieved!

    B. Creating a Lifestyle Budget

    No matter the choices one has chosen in life, each decision requires planning. Can you answer the following questions?

    • How much will the fancy sports car or the six-bedroom house that you desire cost?
    • How will you become a cosmetologist?
    • As a cosmetologist, can you afford to purchase a vacation house?

    Creating a budget for one’s future lifestyle gives you an idea of what is necessary to attain the desired lifestyle.

    Budgeting for the future allows for individuals to create a plan for the future. Students can look at what the future they envision for themselves will realistically look like and cost. It also shows them what is necessary to achieve the desired goal.

    Components of a Budget

    There are several components of a budget that are important to know.

    Some of the components of a budget are:

    • groceries
    • rent/mortgage payment
    • savings
    • transportation
    • utilities

    Creating a budget that includes all of these elements enables individuals to envision the future.

    By asking students to look at their future lifestyle and what it will cost to maintain such a lifestyle will force students to think about their goals, wants and needs.

    __

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have student create a timeline from the present until they are 25 years of age. Have them predict their wants, needs and future goals, as well as perceived educational and academic milestones. Allow time for students to personalize their timelines. Throughout the course, students will have several opportunities to revisit and revise their timelines.
    • Discuss various lifestyle scenarios.
    • Have students create a lifestyle scenario for themselves at age 25 (marital status, educational background, academic achievements, career field). Once timelines and scenarios have been created, you may want to give your students a brief Reality Check at http://www.texasrealitycheck.com/.
    • Provide students with an itemized blank monthly budget sheet. Have students create a monthly budget based on the lifestyle they selected in the previous activity. Allow students to estimate cost of line items. It’s okay if students over or underestimate.
    • Have students complete My Future Projects handout about their life at age 25. Tell them to be as detailed as possible.
    • Visit the website, Labor Market Career Information Unit 1: World of Work for a complete Texas Reality Check lesson.
      http://www.lmci.state.tx.us/news/Career_Orientation/Unit_1.pdf
    • Have students prepare a 90 second speech entitled “What I Learned From Completing My Projected Lifestyle Budget.” Students will present the class with their monthly budget and reflect on what they learned.

    Resources and References

    Technology

    Textbook

    • Bostick, A. (2009). I rock living my dreams: A success system. St. Louis, Missouri: United States.
    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.

    Websites

    • Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Information about specific careers available in the United States, including education and training, salary, benefits and job outlooks.
      http://www.bls.gov/home.htm
    • National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium
      NASDCTEc, through leadership, advocacy and partnerships, supports an innovative CTE system that prepares individuals to succeed in education and their careers and poises the United States to flourish in a global, dynamic economy.
      http://www.careertech.org/

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A lifestyle is:

    • a. the way in which a person has chosen to live his or her life
    • b. a set of attitudes, habits or possessions associated with a particular person or group
    • c. the group of belief systems a person has about themselves
    • d. the way in which others see an individual’s life choices

    2. The decision-making process is critical for students to grasp because:

    • a. students need to make a life plan before graduating from high school
    • b. students need to know how to recover from a negative choice
    • c. the direction one’s life will take is directly impacted by the choices that are made
    • d. we are faced with choices daily

    3. The purpose of creating a lifestyle budget is to:

    • a. know what type of career is needed to live a certain lifestyle
    • b. know how much money must be saved during high school to attain such a lifestyle
    • c. realize that not all dreams will come true and you may need to make sacrifices
    • d. create a plan for a desired lifestyle and to envision how that plan will realistically look and what it will cost

    4. All of the following are components of a budget except:

    • a. utilities
    • b. groceries
    • c. vacation house
    • d. mortgage payment

  • II. Assessment of Personal Skills and Abilities

    shutterstock_163842680

    TEKS Addressed

    (2) The student explores pathways of interest within one or more career clusters. The student is expected to:

    • (B) explore careers of personal interest

    (4) The student explores the professional skills needed for college and career success. The student is expected to:

    • (C) develop a personal six- or eight-year achievement plan that incorporates rigorous academic and relevant enrichment courses
    • (D) explore the steps required to participate in a variety of career and educational opportunities, including, but not limited to, entry-level employment, military service, apprenticeships, community and technical colleges and universities

    Module Content

    Exploring your personal skills and abilities is the second module in this online course.

    This section contains three units of study that include:

    • A. Personal Skills and Abilities
    • B. Interests
    • C. Personality Characteristics

    Refer to lesson:

    Assessment of Personal Skills and Abilities for additional resources and activities (LMCI lesson Unit II Assessments)
    http://www.lmci.state.tx.us/news/Career_Orientation/Unit_2.pdf

    A. Personal Skills and Abilities

    Dreams are great. Goals are important.

    But, putting the plan into writing is the best way to help students sort through:

    • all of the information
    • abilities
    • electives
    • extracurricular activities
    • other factors to find the path to the best career
    • required classes
    • service learning
    • their interests
    • work

    It is important for students to understand that they are unique and their education should be planned to help them accomplish their goals. They should consider each class and think about what would help them acquire the skills and abilities they will need to be successful.

    Students should try out as many areas as they can to collect as many experiences as possible as they go through public school. They should realize that school is for them, not for their teachers. They should make every class and activity count for their benefit.

    Throughout the Career Portals course, students investigate a variety of careers – some they have been exposed to all of their lives, others they may have never considered. If they are freshmen or sophomores, they think that making decisions about their future is a task for later. Juniors and seniors are beginning to realize that time passes quickly and decisions about the time after high school graduation need to be a priority.

    One way for students to discover their personal skills and abilities to be able to apply it to their educational career plans, is to take a personal skills inventory. Discovering what makes a person truly happy can be one of the most exciting steps toward starting a new journey to self discovery and creating a life plan.

    Once a student knows what skill sets they already are familiar with and what tasks they are capable of handling, a school counselor can then suggest some courses that might lead to a career pathway. Career pathways will be discussed in module three of this course.

    Ask the School Counselor
    Each district makes choices about the number of credits, electives, types of classes and other issues that students need to consider as they plan their education.

    The school counselor can provide information about:

    • a list of classes offered at the school and the number of credits for each class
    • dual credit classes and the process and requirements for enrolling in them
    • forms for recording their education and career plans
    • number of credits required for graduation
    • options such as Advanced Placement or Credit Recovery Programs
    • programs such as recommended or minimum plan include Foundation High School Program
    • recommended sequence of classes, such as the classes for a particular career cluster
    • types of credits required, such as the number of elective credits necessary for graduation

    Where To Go From High School?
    Some high school students may be overwhelmed about the types of education after high school or postsecondary education.

    Postsecondary programs include:

    • Community Colleges that offer Associate degrees and credits that transfer to universities.
    • Technical schools that provide skill development and certifications or licenses.
    • Universities that provide education for bachelor degrees and advanced studies for master and doctoral degrees.
    • Online programs that are increasingly available for all or part of the requirements for degrees.

    The Plan

    Students need to realize that when they write a plan down, changes can always be made. It is similar to a rough draft that can be reviewed and edited as they obtain more information about their future.

    The programs of study on the AchieveTexas website include:

    • courses
    • postsecondary options
    • suggestions for curricular and extracurricular activities

    http://www.achievetexas.org/

    Each plan can be downloaded and personalized for a school district prior to print. Students can also make additions or changes on their personal plan before making copies for their portfolio.

    Sources for creating achievement plans

    • Trade Schools, Colleges and Universities
      This guide to trade schools, colleges and universities helps students connect with educational institutions across the United States and Canada.
      http://www.trade-schools.net/

    B. Interests

    The next step in creating a four- or six-year achievement plan is for students to pair their personal skills and abilities with their personal interests. Helping middle school students consider all of the career choices to find the one that might be a match for them is a huge responsibility.

    For most of students’ lives, people have been telling them “You can be anything when you grow up.” Middle and high school is the time for them to seriously compare what they want to be with their skills and abilities.

    Fortunately, there are many resources that students can use to identify their aptitudes, abilities and interests. There is also a wealth of information for them to use to narrow down the choices they have to find a career path. There are many places for students to locate profile assessments. Many of these sites are free and targeted for Texas. It is helpful for students to take several different assessments so they can compare the results.

    The Career Portals course is a good place for students to realistically analyze themselves but also to think “outside the box” as they identify their options.

    Websites to assist students include:

    C. Personality Characteristics

    Personality characteristics are the patterns of behavior, temperament and emotion that make each individual unique. It is these personality characteristics, together with personal skills, abilities and interests, that can lead students to a fitting career.

    Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life.
    - Confucius

    Educators are tasked with the enormous assignment of guiding students towards a career that will give them fulfillment. Confucius’ quote gives students the idea that work does not have to be dull and boring, but instead it can be exciting and adventurous.

    Myers-Briggs Personality
    The Myers-Briggs Personality Indicator test was designed during World War II as a way for individuals entering the workforce to locate jobs that they were best suited for.

    Whatever the circumstances of your life, the understanding of your personality type can make your perceptions clearer, your judgments sounder and your life closer to your heart’s desire.
    -Isabel Briggs Myers

    To discover your Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (personality) score, go to:

    __

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students take an assessment of their personal skills and abilities. Check with your district/campus and see if they have a subscription to a career development assessment program such as Bridges or Kuder.
    • Free assessments can be found at:
      • Texas Cares
        The online version of Texas Cares is the product of the Texas Workforce Commission/Labor Market. Students can take the O*Net Work Importance Locator or Interest Profiler self-assessment tests. Website also includes a video station with over 200 videos on work options, skill and ability, career clusters and occupations.
        http://www.texascaresonline.com/wowmenu.asp
    • Have students take the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (personality test) from MBTI Basics at http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/.
    • Have students complete the interest profiler http://www.texascaresonline.com/ip/ipinstruct.asp.
    • Take online courses at Texas Work Prep LMS. They can set up a free account, take online courses and receive certificates for completion. Try it! Set up an account and see what is available.
      https://www.texasworkprep.com/texasworkprep.htm
    • Have students pair up with another student. Each pair should discuss what they feel the other is good at. Students should rotate around the room. This will give students a good idea of some of the skills and abilities they possess, but maybe did not realize prior to the discussion.
    • Have students research careers that line up with their own personal skills, abilities, interests and personality characteristics.
    • Have students create a career plan through the AchieveTexas website and are available at http://www.achievetexas.org/.
    • Have students research colleges with the careers that match their own personal skills, abilities, interests and personality characteristics at
      http://www.collegefortexans.com/

    Resources and References

    Technology

    Textbook

    • Bostick, A. (2009). I rock living my dreams: A success system. St. Louis, Missouri: United States.
    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.

    Websites

    • National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium
      NASDCTEc, through leadership, advocacy and partnerships, supports an innovative CTE system that prepares individuals to succeed in education and their careers and poises the United States to flourish in a global, dynamic economy.
      http://www.careertech.org/
    • O*Net Online
      This site provides lists of tasks, tools, knowledge, skills, abilities, work activities, and other data. It also clarifies the various career choices available and what they involve.
      http://www.onetonline.org/

    YouTube™

    • Consider a Community College or Technical School
      This video has points to consider about community colleges and technical schools when students are deciding on a career path.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DbnOqvovHiE
    • Preparing High School Students for Careers
      This video focuses on helping high school students become workforce ready and prepare for future careers. This program includes job shadowing, and internships before graduating high school.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_y2RgDPQm4

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. A graduation plan:

    • a. describes activities to be conducted on the night of graduation from high school
    • b. lists courses and activities to complete to reach a career objective
    • c. should be reviewed every year of high school
    • d. b and c

    2. ________________ allows junior or senior students to enroll in a college course and simultaneously earn high school and college credit for the course.

    • a. Credit recovery
    • b. Dual credit
    • c. Statewide articulated classes
    • d. a, b and c

    3. Career learning experiences could include:

    • a. internships
    • b. job shadowing
    • c. career preparation classes
    • d. a, b and c

    4. It is important for students to take several different skill or aptitude assessments because:

    • a. they can compare results
    • b. they can think realistically about their abilities
    • c. they may identify a career they did not originally consider
    • d. all of the above

    5. Personality characteristics are:

    • a. the patterns of behavior, temperament and emotion that make each individual unique
    • b. what makes each person different from one another
    • c. genetically passed down from your parents
    • d. all of the above

  • III. Specific Career Cluster

    shutterstock_165507215

    TEKS Addressed

    (1) The student explores one or more career clusters of interest. The student is expected to:

    • (A) identify the various career opportunities within one or more career clusters
    • (B) identify the pathways within one or more career clusters

    (2) The student explores pathways of interest within one or more career clusters. The student is expected to:

    • (A) investigate career opportunities within the pathways
    • (B) explore careers of personal interest
    • (C) research the academic requirements for careers of personal interest
    • (D) research the certification or educational requirements for careers of
      personal interest
    • (E) describe the technical-skill requirements for careers of personal
      interest

    (3) The student explores programs of study. The student is expected to:

    • (A) compare levels of education for careers of personal interest
    • (B) identify the academic and technical skills needed
    • (C) develop a personal program of study for at least one career

    Module Content

    Prior to this lesson, decide whether to focus on one cluster at a time or all three consecutively.

    Explore three specific career clusters – Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services in the third module in this online course.

    This section contains three units of study that include:

    • A. Introduction to a Specific Career Cluster
    • B. Career Pathways
    • C. Focus on a specific Career of Interest


    Refer to lessons:


    A. Introduction to a Specific Career Cluster

    Career and Technical Education, or CTE, as we commonly call it, is the set of courses, or classes, that help prepare students for the workplace during and after high school.

    There are 16 Career cCusters of courses that are offered within CTE. The 16 clusters were identified by the U.S. Department of Education in 2000.

    Within the 16 Career Clusters, Career Portals aims to explore three specific Career Clusters – Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services. Each Career Cluster classifies workforce preparation programs that are obtained through career and technical education.

    B. Career Pathways and Careers

    Each of the three career clusters discussed in this module contain specific career pathways that the students can choose from.

    A pathway is a sequence of coherent courses that help prepare students for a career within the career path. Each of the courses within a pathway contain classes with rigorous, real-world experiences enabling students to be prepared for postsecondary education or the work force.

    C. Focus on a specific Career of Interest

    Education and Training
    The Principles of Education and Training Career Cluster is for students who are interested in working with children to become teachers, coaches, principals, counselors and other school officials.

    In this cluster, students would take the introductory course – Principles of Education and Training – a course that teaches the fundamentals of teaching, the history of the educational system and more.

    After the principles course, students would take Human Growth and Development which teaches students theories of human growth throughout the lifespan from pregnancy through the aging adult.

    Then, in Instructional Practices in Education and Training, the student has the opportunity to gain field experiences in the elementary setting, middle and high school while at the same time having classroom instruction.

    Practicum in Education and Training also provides students with field experiences as well as helps prepare the student more for college and becoming a classroom teacher.

    Both of the field experience courses provide students with two – three credits as a part of the CTE graduation requirement – public services endorsement.

    Education and Training Pathways
    There are three pathways that fall under the Education and Training Career umbrella.

    The three pathways are:

    • Administration and Administrative Support
    • Professional Support Services
    • Teaching and Training

    Some of the careers in this pathway include:

    • audiologists
    • coaches
    • counselors
    • diagnosticians
    • principals
    • teachers

    The education and training necessary for careers within the education and training cluster vary greatly on the specific job tasks.

    Hospitality and Tourism

    The hospitality and tourism industry maintains the largest national employment base in the private sector. Students use knowledge and skills that meet industry standards to function effectively in various positions within this multifaceted industry.

    Students are encouraged to participate in extended learning experiences such as career and technical student organizations and other leadership or extracurricular organizations.

    Hospitality and Tourism Pathways

    In the Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster, there are several career pathways to choose from such as:

    • lodging
    • recreation, amusements and attractions
    • restaurants and food/beverage services
    • travel and tourism

    Hospitality and tourism consists of careers that deal with customer service such as:

    • chefs/cooks
    • concierge
    • general managers
    • travel agents

    Human Services
    The State Board of Education has approved 12 high school courses in the Human Services Career Cluster; however, not all high schools offer all courses.

    Students who take the Consumer Services pathway will discover how to become financially fit, meaning they will know how and when to apply for a credit card, how to balance a checkbook, how to calculate interest payments and more.

    Students who are interested in Counseling and Mental Health Services will take courses in counseling individuals and families of all ages.

    Early Childhood Development and Services gives students insights into the early intervention techniques and programs available to parents and teachers for young children.

    The Family and Community Services pathway prepares students for careers that aid families and individuals within the community with special needs such as financial assistance, housing issues, disabilities, employment, social services and more.

    Students who are interested in Personal Care Services will be exposed to a variety of careers that cater to an individual’s personal care such as cosmetology, spa and fitness, funeral services and more.

    Human Services Pathways

    Within the Human Services Career Cluster, there are several career pathways such as:

    • consumer services
    • counseling and mental health services
    • early childhood development and services
    • family and community services
    • personal care services

    There are several different careers within the Human Services Cluster. Each of the careers in this cluster require excellent people and communication skills.

    Careers include:

    • health educators
    • loan counselors
    • marriage counselors
    • massage therapists
    • preschool teachers
    • social workers

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Give an overview of the Career Portals course with the PowerPoint™ Introduction to Career Portals.
    • Give an overview of all Career Clusters using the Career Clusters PowerPoint™.
    • Have students identify and describe each of the three career clusters using AchieveTexas In Action College and Career Planning Guides.
    • Have students identify programs of study within each of the three career clusters and create a multimedia presentation about the program of study.
    • Allow students opportunities to identify and investigate careers within each of the three career clusters.
    • Have students develop a career pathway for a specific career of interest. What Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses does your campus/district offer? What colleges or universities offer degrees or certifications for your selected career?
    • Have students create a portfolio containing various documents and projects throughout the school year.
    • Research careers using the handout Career Investigations.
    • Organize a mini career day with guests from each of the respective career clusters.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Textbooks

    • Bostick, A. (2009). I rock living my dreams: A success system. St. Louis, Missouri: United States.
    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.

    Websites

    • Bureau of Labor Statistics
      Information about specific careers available in the United States, including education and training, salary, benefits and job outlooks.
      http://www.bls.gov/home.htm
    • National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium
      NASDCTEc, through leadership, advocacy and partnerships, supports an innovative CTE system that prepares individuals to succeed in education and their careers and poises the United States to flourish in a global, dynamic economy.
      http://www.careerclusters.org
    • O*Net Resource Center
      Career exploration tools to help students consider and plan career options, preparation, and transitions more effectively.
      http://www.onetcenter.org/tools.html

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The three Career Clusters covered in Career Portals are:

    • a. Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services
    • b. Criminal Justice, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services
    • c. Education and Training, Marketing and Human Services
    • d. Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Finance

    2. A career pathway is:

    • a. a grouping of classes a guidance counselor suggests a student to take in high school
    • b. a cluster of possible career options
    • c. an option a career aptitude test suggests a student to take
    • d. a sequence of coherent courses that help prepare students for a career within the career path

    3. Possible careers within the Education and Training Career Cluster include:

    • a. concierge, ticket booth clerks, general managers and travel agents
    • b. preschool teachers, marriage counselors, loan counselors, massage therapists, health educators and social workers
    • c. teachers, counselors, principals, diagnosticians, audiologists and coaches
    • d. teachers, coaches, fashion designers, social workers and travel agents

    4. Possible careers within the Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster include:

    • a. concierge, ticket booth clerks, general managers and travel agents
    • b. fashion designers, preschool teachers, marriage counselors, loan counselors, massage therapists, health educators and social workers
    • c. teachers, counselors, principals, diagnosticians, audiologists and coaches
    • d. teachers, coaches, fashion designers, social workers and travel agents

    5. Possible careers within the Human Services Career Cluster include:

    • a. concierge, ticket booth clerks, general managers and travel agents
    • b. fashion designers, preschool teachers, marriage counselors, loan counselors, massage therapists, health educators and social workers
    • c. teachers, counselors, principals, diagnosticians, audiologists and coaches.
    • d. teachers, coaches, fashion designers, social workers and travel agents

  • IV. College and Career Readiness

    shutterstock_224998789

    TEKS Addressed

    (4) The student explores the professional skills needed for college and career success. The student is expected to:

    • (A) articulate the importance of strong academic skills to meet personal academic and career goals
    • (B) explore the importance of curricular, extracurricular, career preparation and extended learning experiences
    • (C) develop a personal six- or eight-year achievement plan that incorporates rigorous academic and relevant enrichment courses
    • (D) explore the steps required to participate in a variety of career and educational opportunities, including, but not limited to, entry-level employment, military service apprenticeships, community and technical colleges and universities
    • (E) identify professional associations affiliated with a specified program of study
    • (F) employ effective leadership, teamwork and conflict management
    • (G) recognize the value of community service and volunteerism
    • (H) demonstrate characteristics required for personal and professional success including work ethics, integrity, dedication, perseverance and the ability to interact with a diverse population

    Module Content

    This module contains information to help prepare students for postsecondary education and the work force. It is the fourth module of this online course.

    This section contains four units of study that include:

    • A. Academic Skills
    • B. School Coursework
    • C. Extended Learning and Career/Educational Opportunities
    • D. Professional Associations


    Refer to lessons:

    A. Academic Skills

    Our society is comprised of fast-paced, tech savvy individuals who are ready and willing to work. Employers are looking for a specific set of skills that can be utilized on the job. Regardless of a student’s plans, all students need to prepare for some type of post-secondary education, whether it be a two- or four-year college/university, trade school or on-the-job training. While in school, students can gain invaluable transferable skills needed for life beyond high school.

    Skills Needed for College and Career Readiness
    Whether students are going to college or going straight to the workforce, the skills needed for each are the same:

    • Communication
    • Leadership
    • Organization
    • Study skills
    • Test-taking
    • Time management
    • Writing skills

    Each skill listed is required for students to reach personal academic and career goals. Preparation for college and career readiness begins immediately when the student enters middle school.

    Sure, the student is not going off to college upon leaving middle school; however, students can begin actively preparing themselves for life beyond high school by setting realistic, attainable goals, both academic and personal. It also involves choosing academically challenging classes, maintaining good grades, becoming involved on and off campus and exploring career interests.

    Students must begin actively doing these things to preparing themselves for life beyond high school.

    B. School Coursework

    Part of a student’s academic success greatly depends upon the planning and attention to detail given to the school courses chosen throughout middle and high school. Creating plans for one’s future leads to success and in turn creates mindful, high-achieving students.

    Developing a Six- or Eight-Year Achievement Plan
    Goal setting for a personal and academic achievement plan is vital in a student’s success.

    Goals need to be:

    • measurable
    • realistic
    • specific

    A person cannot expect to lose 100 pounds in a month. Make sure the goal is something you can realistically attain within a set time period.

    Short goals can be reached within a short time period, usually within one year. A short-term goal can be a stepping stone toward a long-term goal – a goal that takes more than a year to accomplish.

    • Goal: A statement of something a person wants or needs to do
    • Long-term goal: A goal that will take more than a year to achieve
    • Short-term goal: A goal that can be achieved within a year

    Goal-Setting Model

    1. Define the objective/goal
    2. Determine the steps required
    3. Evaluate the methods
    4. Evaluate the outcome

    The most important step in the goal setting process is evaluation. Always review the methods used to reach the goal to ensure the correct choices were made. If not, repeat the process until the desired results are achieved!

    C. Extended Learning and Career/Educational Opportunities

    Career preparation courses give students a real-world experience that provide students with a wide variety of skills that can be used during and after high school. Students can participate in extended learning and career or educational opportunities though curricular and extracurricular activities and Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs).

    Career and Technical Student Organizations (CTSOs)
    The Education and Training, Hospitality and Tourism and Human Services clusters contain several CTSOs.

    The three main CTSOs available for students to participate in are:

    • FCCLA
    • SkillsUSA
    • TAFE

    Co-Curricular Activities
    Co-curricular activities may take place during the course period or are tied to the course and its credit for the course.

    Examples of co-curriculars are:

    • FCCLA
    • SkillsUSA
    • TAFE

    Extra-Curricular Activities
    Extra-curricular activities includes activities that extend beyond the classroom and are not tied to course credit.

    Examples of extra-curriculars are:

    • band
    • choir
    • journalism
    • orchestra
    • yearbook

    According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, in 2010, 32% of high school students participated in co-curricular and extra-curricular activities. The study conducted also said that students who participated in these activities were more likely to attend college.

    Career Preparation
    Career Preparation courses are divided into two types of courses – Career Preparation I and II and Practicum Courses.

    These types of courses help students to:

    • acquire transferable skills
    • balance school, work and extra-curricular activities
    • discover details about a specific industry
    • experience what the “real world” expects of you
    • learn to work with others
    • possibly get paid

    Extended Learning Opportunities
    Service learning is at the basis of all CTE courses. It is a requirement of all upper-level CTE courses because of the valuable skills and knowledge students gain from it.

    Service learning activities give students a real-world application of what they are learning in the classroom. A service learning project can involve direct action in which students respond to a community need by interacting with and impacting the community – for example, sewing fleece blankets for the homeless.

    Indirect service is in response to the community need – for example, conducting a canned food drive.

    Research and Advocacy service is when students find, gather and report on information to raise awareness of a problem and/or advocate for change about a specific community concern – for example breast cancer awareness.

    D. Professional Associations

    There are several reasons to join a professional organization. They may provide you with a wealth of resources through colleagues.

    Professional organizations may also have opportunities for:

    • career opportunities
    • knowledge
    • networking
    • professional development
    • resources

    Career Opportunities
    A benefit of joining a professional association is career opportunities. Members usually have access to exclusive career opportunity listings that are not available to the public. Some associations offer assistance in searching for careers such as help writing resumes, cover letters and interviewing.

    Knowledge
    Professional associations keep members aware of news, trends, advancements and
    changes in their field.

    Networking
    No matter what area of life or stage in your education or career, networking is beneficial. Getting to know others in your field can provide you with a great support system with which you can share ideas, gain advice, have a mentor and access to references on job applications.

    Professional Development
    Often times professional associations offer access to free trainings or at a reduced cost to members. They also offer regular meetings to share ideas, participate in discussion groups and sometimes offer continuing education credits which are needed for many fields of study, including education.

    Resources
    Membership in professional organizations also gives you privileges to industry specific resources such as scholarly journals, magazines, webinars, podcasts, books and online training opportunities. Again, these resources are offered free or at a reduced price to members.
    __

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Articulate the importance of strong academic skills in relation to GPA, ranking and scholarships to meet personal academic and career goals. Invite the data clerk or a counselor from your school as a guest speaker. They may be able to give students a copy of their transcripts. Or, invite an admission’s counselor from a college as a guest speaker.
    • Explore the importance of curricular, extracurricular, (CTSOs, other school clubs and organizations) career preparation, (internships) and extended learning experiences (summer employment).
    • Develop a personal six- or eight-year achievement plan that incorporates rigorous academic and relevant enrichment courses.
    • Explore the steps required to participate in a variety of career and educational opportunities, including, but not limited to, entry-level employment, military service, apprenticeships, community and technical colleges and universities.
    • Identify professional associations affiliated with a specified program of study.
    • Allow opportunities for students to explore and practice effective leadership, teamwork and conflict management.
    • Participate in a service learning project.
    • Create a video documenting a service learning project. Take pictures/video that demonstrate each step of the process. Use the video to teach parents, teachers and other students about service learning.
    • Assign handout Career Research Assignment to students.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Textbooks

    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Bostick, A. (2009). I rock living my dreams: A success system. St. Louis, Missouri: United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.
    • Kaye, C. B. (2010). The complete guide to service learning. Free Spirit Publishing.
    • Kimbrell, G., & Vineyard, B. (2008). Succeeding in the world of work. Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Mortenson, G. and Roth, S. (2009). Listen to the wind: The story of Dr. Greg and three cups of tea. New York, NY: Penguin Young Readers Group.
    • Mortenson, G. and Relin, D. (2009). Three cups of tea: One man’s journey to change the world, one child at a time. New York, NY: Penguin Young Readers Group.
    • Reynold, J. (2010). Hospitality services: Food and lodging. (2nd ed.) Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Co., Inc.
    • Silverstein, S. (1999). The Giving Tree. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

    Websites

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Service learning project ideas should originate from:

    • a. student generated ideas
    • b. community needs
    • c. campus needs
    • d. classroom instructor

    2. Career and Technical Student Organizations include:

    • a. TAFE
    • b. FCCLA
    • c. SkillsUSA
    • d. All of the above

    3. Organization, communication and leadership are all skills needed for:

    • a. on-the-job training
    • b. the workforce
    • c. college and career readiness
    • d. a two- or four-year college/university

    4. When creating goals, they should be:

    • a. realistic, specific and measurable
    • b. realistic, specific and attainable
    • c. smart, attainable and measurable
    • d. based upon a needs and wants survey

    5. The difference between curricular and extracurricular activities is:

    • a. curricular activities relates to life outside of school
    • b. extracurricular activities are activities performed for extra credit
    • c. curricular activities may take place during the course period or are tied to the course and its credit for the course
    • d. extracurricular activities are performed as part of career preparation during the summer before work begins

    6. An example of a service learning activity is:

    • a. helping your teacher move books after class
    • b. volunteering to hand out fundraiser supplies
    • c. sewing fleece blankets for the homeless
    • d. an activity for which you get paid

    7. Professional organizations offer:

    • a. networking opportunities
    • b. professional development
    • c. career opportunities
    • d. all of the above

  • V. Job Seeking Skills

    shutterstock_85840621

    TEKS Addressed

    (7) The student explores job-seeking skills. The student is expected to:

    • (A) identify the steps for an effective job search
    • (B) describe appropriate appearance for an interview
    • (C) participate in a mock interview

    (8) The student creates professional documents required for employment. The student is expected to:

    • (A) develop a résumé
    • (B) write appropriate business correspondence such as a letter of intent and a thank you letter
    • (C) complete sample job applications
    • (D) explain protocol for use of references

    Module Content

    This module contains information pertinent to students acquiring job-related skills. It is the fifth module in this online course.

    This section contains six units of study that include:

    • A. Overview of job seeking skills
    • B. Business correspondence
    • C. Job applications
    • D. Reference letters
    • E. Dress for success
    • F. Interview skills


    Refer to lessons:

    A. Overview of Job Seeking Skills
    The interview process can be one of the most overwhelming situations for a student, especially when it is a student’s first job.

    Employers are looking for a key set of employability skills that shows the candidate is able to:

    • be organized
    • communicate
    • lead others
    • manage time wisely

    Candidates can convey these key skills through:

    • interview attire
    • letters of intent
    • job applications
    • reference letters
    • résumés
    • the actual interview
    • thank you letters

    B. Business Correspondence
    Throughout the interview process, the hiring manager will ask for documents relevant to applying for a position within the company. These documents give the hiring manager an insight into the candidate’s personal, academic and professional abilities and capabilities.

    Résumé Writing
    A résumé is a personal “fact sheet,” used when looking for a job. It is the only document most job applicants will leave with a prospective employer. It is the main tool employers use to compare a potential employee with others. For that reason alone, individuals should give great attention to making a résumé be the best it can be.

    Constructing a Résumé
    One of the first documents a potential employer will see is the résumé. It is a brief history of your educational and work background.

    The résumé should include:

    • activities
    • an objective
    • awards
    • educational background
    • employment history
    • special skills
    • up-to-date contact information

    Functional résumé – This type of résumé format works well for people with limited work experience, or have been out of the workforce for a while, or who seek to change their careers at some point. This type of résumé focuses more on an individual’s skills than on one’s employment history. This is a good format for a high school student who is looking for their first job.

    Students can list involvement in high school with:

    • accomplishments
    • extracurricular activities
    • volunteering activities

    Chronological résumé – The chronological résumé is the style most people are familiar with. This type of résumé showcases the progression of skills and experience to a potential employer.

    A résumé‘s objective describes the purpose of the résumé.

    It is customized to:

    • describe desirable skills a prospective employer wants
    • entice a hiring manager to continue reading the résumé
    • match the position being applied for

    The objective should be two or three lines long at most.

    The educational history contains information about:

    • previous school(s) attended
    • dates and addresses of the school(s)

    The employment record contains all skills and accomplishments that directly relate to the résumé‘s objective including:

    • addresses of present and/or previous work experiences
    • companies/jobs worked for
    • dates of employment
    • job duties

    Students who have minimal work experience can include:

    • babysitting
    • lawn care
    • volunteer work

    Even though it was not a job at a retail store or chain restaurant, babysitting and lawn care are still considered work and can be included as part of one’s work history.

    Include all skills and accomplishments that directly relate to your objective such as:

    • A/B honor roll
    • attendance
    • class recognitions
    • clubs
    • curricular and extra-curricular activities
    • organizations
    • service learning activities
    • sporting events

    Lastly, résumés should highlight:

    • fluency in multiple languages
    • leadership
    • marketable skills
    • organization

    Résumé Tips

    The résumé should be:

    • brief and concise
    • easy to read
    • visually appealing

    Other tips include:

    • use “action words” to highlight accomplishments and achievements
    • use white or off white paper only – DO NOT use scented papers!
    • proofread – look for spelling and grammatical errors

    Letter of Intent
    The letter of intent accompanies the résumé and serves as an introduction to your résumé. It tells the employer the prospective employee is interested in the job and how the person learned of the position.

    There are generally several applicants for a position, therefore, to ensure a résumé stands out above the stack, be sure to highlight reasons why the individual should be considered for the position.

    Always include:

    • contact information
    • when and how you can be reached

    Lastly, be sure to state you would like to meet for an interview.

    Thank You Letters
    A follow-up letter or a thank you letter is often a forgotten part of the interview process.

    A thank you letter should be immediately sent following an interview to let the hiring manager know you are indeed interested in the position and that you appreciated the interviewer taking time to interview you.

    In our digital age, it is also quite common to send a follow-up e-mail message. An electronic message is a great tool to use because it is quick, easy and is immediately sent to the interviewer. The candidate no longer has to wait for snail mail for this option.

    Writing a Thank You Letter
    Begin the letter explaining to the hiring manager that you are indeed interested in the position and that you appreciated the interviewer taking time to interview you.

    Always thank the interviewer – he or she did take the time out of their busy schedule to sit down with you. Then, remind the interviewer of something you discussed during your interview that he or she was particularly fond of – this will help the interviewer to remember you when he or she reads over the follow-up letter.

    Lastly, end the thank you letter by stating you look forward to hearing from the hiring manager soon. Remind the interviewer how he or she may contact you.

    C. Job Applications
    Job applications come in two forms – print and electronic versions.

    Submitting a paper copy of a job application can have its benefits over an online application because it allows you to see the place in person that you are applying to and how the business is run. It also allows the manager to meet you in person when you hand deliver the application.

    On the other hand, submitting an online application also has its benefits. It allows you to quickly send several applications while in the comforts of your own home.

    Most applications will begin with:

    • personal contact information
      • name
      • address
      • phone number
      • email
      • date of birth

    Next, you will most likely be asked questions about your educational background – where you went to school and for how long you attended that school. Some applications will ask about your activities, hobbies and interests – remember to keep this area professional and add positive activities, hobbies or interests.

    All applications will ask you about your work history. It is important to be truthful about your work history because your future employer will call previous employers and conduct a background check.

    The goal of the job application is to ensure it stands out among the stack of applications.

    This can be done by:

    • completing the application in its entirety
    • using neat handwriting
    • following directions on the application
    • highlighting an individual’s best qualities

    The Job Search
    When searching for a job, it is important to dress appropriately. Some hiring managers will want to have an impromptu interview when the person submits an application. Therefore, always be ready when asking for an application and when returning an application for an unplanned interview.

    Completing a Job Application
    Before completing a job application, always read the directions and make sure you have all of the required information before you begin filling out the application. This will ensure the process is easier for you and you fill out the application accurately.

    The information can be kept on a data sheet on hand, a résumé or even notes on your cell phone. It really helps to have the information on hand when completing the application so it can be accurately filled out instead of guessing.

    Along with the résumé, this is the first document a hiring manager will see, so it is important to fill out the application completely and use neat, legible handwriting.

    D. Reference Letters
    Most companies will ask potential employees to provide references – names and phone numbers of persons who can tell them more about you. Candidates should keep this information available when inquiring about a job position.

    A reference is an individual to whom one refers to for testimony as to character, skills or abilities. A reliable reference should not be relatives, but instead should be someone that can give a positive, professional recommendation.

    Inform students that they should ask permission from the individuals prior to placing their name as a reference on a resume.

    E. Dress for Success
    Clothes and appearance say a lot about a person! It shows you care about the interview and that you are taking it seriously.

    Interviewees should dress conservatively in clean, pressed and appropriate clothing. Good grooming and personal hygiene is a must!!

    The key to a perfect interview is to be confident but not boastful.

    General clothing tips for both men and women:

    • always iron your clothes
    • a two-piece suit is always the best and safest choice
    • bright colors and patterns should be avoided
    • wear classics like wool or wool blends
    • wear minimal pieces of jewelry

    Men should choose socks that match their pants and do not show skin. Shoes and belts should be a durable leather material. Belts should always match the shoes. For men who choose to display facial hair, it should be well groomed.

    Just as with the men’s attire, a woman should always choose classic styles in clothing.

    Shoes should be a durable, leather material. Hosiery should be plain and should not be patterned. For an interview, simple is best when it comes to make-up and nails. Women should avoid heavy make-up or fancy nails. A small, simple leather purse that matches the outfit is best.

    Men and women should be sure to look themselves over before going on an interview. Personal appearance tells the interviewer how much time an individual spent preparing for the interview and if the person took it seriously.

    If you are interviewing for a summer job such as a camp counselor or a lifeguard, then interview dress can be more casual.

    Young men do not have to wear a tie but should still dress professionally.
    Shirt should be button-down, khakis and a belt are appropriate.

    Young women should wear nice pants (khakis or dress pants) and a blouse. Dresses and skirts are also appropriate and will help keep you cool, but they should be knee-length. The outfit should be free of wrinkles and any rips or holes.

    F. Interview Skills
    With a great résumé in hand, next comes a successful interview.

    The purpose of a job interview is for the hiring manager to learn more about the applicant and for the applicant to gain more knowledge about the position applied for. The interview process is very important. This is the candidate’s chance to shine and let the hiring manager know why you are the best person for the job. The interview is an opportunity for students to make a lasting first impression.

    Interview Do’s

    Be sure to:

    • know the exact time and location or your interview
    • arrive at least 10 minutes early
    • be courteous and respectful
    • give a firm handshake
    • make eye contact
    • be friendly
    • use correct grammar and pronunciation
    • sit still in your seat; avoid fidgeting and slouching
    • ask for clarification if you don’t understand a question
    • be honest
    • treat the interview seriously
    • have a positive attitude
    • prepare questions for your interviewer

    After the interview, be sure to send the interviewer a thank you note as soon as possible. This lets the interviewer know you are still interested in the job and that you appreciate them taking the time to interview you.

    Interview Don’ts

    Remember to:

    • go alone to your interview
    • turn off cell phone or put ringer on silent, or
    • leave your cell phone at home or in the car

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students review several different types of résumés. Possibly even display some of the faculty’s résumés (be sure to black out personal information.)
    • Distribute the handout, Basic Information for a Résumé and Gathering Information for a Résumé and have the students complete each.
    • Have students create a résumé.
    • Participate in the FCCLA or TAFE job interview competitive events.
    • Collect job applications for students to review.
    • Have students complete job applications.
    • Distribute Mini Data Sheet for students to complete about their personal data relevant to job seeking.
    • Encourage students to find at least three professional, non-family job references.
    • Review the help wanted ads in print or online.
    • Have upper classmen model professional clothing to the students.
    • Distribute handout Job Interview Dos and Don’ts and discuss the items.
    • Students could use magazine cut-outs to create a poster of a five-day wardrobe for an individual within a specific career field assigned.
    • Students could use www.glogster.com to create an online interactive poster of a five-day wardrobe for an individual within a specific career field assigned.
    • Students could use http://www.polyvore.com/cgi/app to create and publish a wardrobe for a five-day work week for an individual within a specific career field assigned.
    • Allow students to practice 101 Interview Questions in pairs, groups or in front of the whole class.
    • Conduct a mock interview using Mock Interview Documents.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Textbooks

    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.
    • Kaye, C. B. (2010). The complete guide to service learning. Free Spirit Publishing.
    • Kimbrell, G., & Vineyard, B. (2008). Succeeding in the world of work.
    Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.

    Websites

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Which of the following is not a form of business correspondence discussed as part of the interview process?

    • a. E-mail messages
    • b. Letters of intent
    • c. Résumés
    • d. Follow-up letters

    2. When completing a job application, applicants should:

    • a. complete the form in its entirety
    • b. complete the form in blue or black ink
    • c. read all directions before completing
    • d. all of the above

    3. Which of the following is an example of a professional reference?

    • a. Friends
    • b. Family members
    • c. Previous employers
    • d. College roommates

    4. For the purpose of an interview, bright colors and patterns:

    • a. should be worn with caution
    • b. are best complimented with a dark shoe and purse
    • c. are permitted with permission of the interviewer
    • d. should be avoided

    5. Which of the following is an interview don’t?

    • a. It is okay to answer a phone call during an interview as long as it is your parent
    • b. Arrive early to an interview
    • c. Firm handshake
    • d. Make eye contact with the hiring manager

    6. Following the interview, it is common courtesy to:

    • a. send the interviewer a box of chocolates
    • b. send a follow-up letter or thank you letter
    • c. call the hiring manager to ask if you received the position
    • d. wait in the lobby until all interviews are completed and speak to the manager about the position again

  • VI. Personal Banking

    shutterstock_126097778

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student understands personal financial management and recognizes the value of personal fiscal responsibility. The student is expected to:

    • (A) compare and contrast different types of banking services
    • (B) open and maintain different types of simulated bank accounts
    • (C) practice different methods of withdrawing and depositing funds
    • (D) reconcile bank statements, including fees and services

    Module Content

    Management of personal finances is the sixth module in this online course.

    This section contains three units of study that include:

    • A. Bank Accounts
    • B. Debit Cards vs. Check Writing
    • C. Importance of Reconciling Your Bank Account


    Refer to lessons:

    A. Bank Accounts / B. Debit Cards vs. Check Writing

    Types of Bank Accounts

    Individual account: A bank account in the name of one person

    Joint account: A bank account in the names of two or more persons or parties and subject to withdrawals by each

    Savings account: A bank account on which interest is paid, traditionally one for which a bankbook is used to record deposits, withdrawals and interest payments

    Interest: A sum paid to the account holder by the bank for the use of money or for borrowing money.

    The decision to choose a bank should be made with a few considerations.

    First, a consumer must consider:

    • automated teller machines (ATM) availability
    • branch offices
    • location
    • office hours

    Then, a consumer should consider:

    • fees assessed
    • restrictions, if any
    • types of accounts offered by the bank

    Some banks impose:

    • balance requirements
    • holds on deposits
    • variety of fees

    The fees can be:

    • a monthly requirement
    • a result of using an automated teller machine (ATM)
    • overdrafts
    • requesting a stop-payment
    • other services

    Lastly, a consumer should consider:

    • special features offered by the bank, such as:
      • automatic bill pay
      • direct deposit
      • online banking
      • overdraft protection
      • the possibility of free banking

    Debit Cards

    Debit cards give consumers the freedom to purchase goods electronically without having to carry cash.

    Consumers swipe their debit cards through the electronic card reader, enter their Personal Identification Number (PIN) number and complete the on-screen prompts to complete the purchase transaction.

    Debit cards also give consumers access to cash quickly through ATM withdrawals.

    Bank customers can withdraw money from their bank’s ATM, or through banks with which they do not hold accounts, simply by inserting their debit card into the ATM and entering their PIN number.

    Some banks will impose a fee for using other bank’s ATMs.

    Writing Checks

    Check purchases are not as convenient as debit cards, although they are still easy to make.

    When making a check purchase, consumers should also use a pen and completely fill out the check.

    Check purchasers should consider completing the check in cursive rather than print. This is because it is easier for others to make changes to the printing on the check and commit check fraud.

    C. Importance of Reconciling Your Bank Account

    Budgeting and Financial Planning

    • Consumer Activities
      A consumer has many decisions to make throughout his or her financial lifespan. The decisions involve utilization of the resources available to the consumer and the consumer’s family. Because resources are usually limited, financial planning can help consumers and their families with their economic choices.
    • Financial Planning is the process of managing financial resources (money) so one can achieve goals and dreams. It involves dealing with financial limitations that come with every stage of life. Financial planning is a journey, not a destination!

    Financial Planning Begins with a Decision-Making Model

    1. Define the objective
    2. Determine the choices
    3. Evaluate the choices
    4. Make the decision
    5. Evaluate the decision

    The first step in financial planning is budget preparation.

    Many people experience financial crisis because of:

    • inadequate savings
    • poor planning
    • too much debt

    A budget is a plan for spending money on necessary resources.

    A budget involves:

    • estimating income
      • money coming in from:
        • gifts
        • investments
        • work
    • estimating expenses
      • money going out to pay for life’s necessities such as:
        • cars
        • food
        • housing
        • taxes

    Steps in budget preparation:

    • Income
      • Gross Income (before taxes)
      • Net Income (after taxes)

    Be sure to include irregular payments such as:

    • bonuses
    • gifts
    • interest payments from:
      • investments
      • savings
    • tips

    Identify Expenses

    • Fixed Expenses – Regular payments that don’t change, such as:
      • car payments
      • credit card payments
      • rent or mortgage
    • Variable Expenses – Amounts can change, such as:
      • clothing
      • entertainment
      • groceries
    • Savings contributions – Don’t forget savings, which should be treated as an expense. There are many reasons to save, including:
      • education
      • emergencies
      • goals
      • large expenses
      • retirement
      • vacations
    • Occasional Expenses – Items such as:
      • insurance
      • gifts
      • medical expenses
      • taxes

    A budget should be prepared on a monthly basis, listing income (money coming in) and subtracting expenses (money going out).

    The goal is a balanced budget with all money accounted for. If the ending amount is positive, more money is available for saving. If the ending amount is negative, the consumer must reduce expenses or increase income to balance the budget to zero.

    Get some budget practice at:

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Practical Money Skills for Life provides free online resources for educators focused on financial literacy and education. Explore games, calculators and lessons at: http://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/
    • See Hands on Banking http://www.handsonbanking.org/en/. Activities can be reviewed as a class with the use of a projector and notes handout.
    • Free financial education materials for teachers are available from the National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) High School Financial Planning Program®. The NEFE HSFPP is intended for use as a public service to enhance the financial literacy of youth. http://hsfpp.nefe.org/home/
    • Invite a guest speaker, such as a certified financial planner or credit counselor, to speak to the class on the effects of cultural, demographic, and societal factors on family financial decisions.
    • Have students complete Maintaining Your Account handout. Allow for questions and discussion.
    • Have students complete The Guide to Banking. Have students share and compare their completed bank deposits.
    • Have students complete How To Reconcile a Bank Account.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Textbook

    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.
    • Lowe, R. (2006.) Consumer education & economics, Student Edition. 6th Edition. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Wehlage, N. (2001.) Goals for living: Managing your resources. Edition. Goodheart-Wilcox Publisher.

    Websites

    • Debit Card Basics
      Practical Money Skills for Life
      If credit cards mean “pay later,” debit cards mean “pay now.” These cards are tied to your bank account and are like paying with cash. With debit cards, you’ve got to have the money in the bank to cover your purchases. These cards look similar to credit cards so make sure you know what type of card your financial institution issued you.
      https://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/downloads/pdfs/PMS_Guide_DebitCard.pdf
    • National Endowment for Financial Education
      The National Endowment for Financial Education (NEFE) is the leading private nonprofit 501(C)(3) national foundation dedicated to inspiring empowered financial decision-making for individuals and families through every stage of life.
      http://www.nefe.org/
    • NEFE High School Financial Planning Program
      For over twenty-five years this award-winning, free, non-commercial financial education program has been provided to millions of students in thousands of schools and community organizations throughout the country.
      http://hsfpp.nefe.org/

    YouTube™

    • Tips on How to Manage Your Money
      See and learn the financial wisdom of our elders and become wiser on how to manage money wiser. Here are some great tips from Warren Buffet: American billionaire, investor, businessman, and philanthropist. Distributed by Tubemogul.
      http://youtu.be/Ktute59Tzv0

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Which of the following bank accounts is known as a savings account?

    • a. A bank account in the name of one person
    • b. A bank account that holds a higher balance to avoid a monthly fee
    • c. A bank account in the names of two or more persons or parties and subject to withdrawals by each
    • d. A bank account on which interest is paid, traditionally one for which a bankbook is used to record deposits, withdrawals and interest payments

    2. Debit cards:

    • a. give consumers the freedom to purchase goods electronically without having to carry cash
    • b. are the same as electronic check purchases
    • c. require the consumer to visit an ATM prior to making a purchase
    • d. can only be used for ATM withdraws at the individual’s bank

    3. The best description of a budget is:

    • a. a financial tool for consumers who have very little money
    • b. a plan for saving and spending money
    • c. a set of restrictions for how a consumer can spend money
    • d. a statement of savings and debt

    4. Budgeting a particular amount for savings should be treated as:

    • a. something to do if there is any money left after other expenses
    • b. an important step in reaching financial goals
    • c. helpful in preparing for unexpected emergencies
    • d. b and c

    5. Banks are considered safe places to keep money because:

    • a. owners of the bank will honor their obligations
    • b. banks will pay interest on the money deposited by consumers in accounts
    • c. most accounts are insured by a federal agency call FDIC
    • d. a consumer can withdraw their money in person or online

    6. A budget is a tool:

    • a. to help you plan, prioritize and manage your income
    • b. to help you plan, prioritize and manage expenses
    • c. that needs to be reviewed and updated when you experience a change in income and expenses
    • d. all of the above

    7. Life events that involve money matters include, but are not limited to:

    • a. buying a car
    • b. renting an apartment
    • c. marriage
    • d. all of the above

  • VII. Career Research

    shutterstock_212353825

    TEKS Addressed

    (6) The student explores labor market information. The student is expected to:

    • (A) analyze national, state, regional and local labor market information
    • (B) cite evidence of high-skill, high-wage or high-demand occupations based on analysis of labor market information
    • (C) analyze the effects of changing employment trends, societal needs and economic conditions on career planning.

    Module Content

    Management of financial resources is the seventh module in this online course.

    This section contains three units of study that include:

    • A. Analyzing the Labor Market
    • B. Employment Trends
    • C. Outlook

    __

    A. Analyzing the Labor Market

    Every year the job market changes. Careers that were once thought of as having a stable market and new openings daily, sometimes plummet and are no longer in need of new hires. Likewise, some careers are new to the labor force and occur due to the ever changing society.

    Students looking into careers choices should research interested careers to determine if the career is a good fit for them.

    Resources to research career information include:

    • The Occupational Outlook Handbook
      Provides information and statistics on a wide range of occupations and individual jobs. This information is revised every two years and provides a detailed description of each occupation covered.
      http://www.bls.gov/

    • O*NET OnLine
      Detailed descriptions of the world of work for use by job seekers, workforce development and HR professionals, students, researchers and more.
      http://www.onetonline.org/

    Each website displays the following information about careers:

    • Abilities
    • Education
    • Interest code
    • Job zone
    • Knowledge
    • Skills
    • Tasks
    • Tools and technology
    • Wages and employment trends
    • Work activities
    • Work styles
    • Work values

    Additional career research resources:

    • CareerOneStop
      Compares state information to national perspectives. Also has tools to help job seekers, students, businesses and career professionals.
      http://www.careerinfonet.org/

    Students can also utilize the Career and Technical Education Texas Genuine website to:

    • complete a “Find Your Future” career assessment, providing them with their top three Career Clusters® of interest
    • explore potential careers that fall within their top Career Clusters® of interest
    • view salary information and educational requirements for potential careers
    • watch short videos to learn about CTE programs offered at the more than 50 public community and technical colleges throughout the state

    Counselors, advisors and educators can complete the site’s free MPOWER TEXAS e-course to learn more about the need for, value of and availability of CTE career pathways in Texas.

    Salaries
    Each year, as the demand for various jobs and careers change, so does the salary for each position. The need and demand for specific positions can lead to increases in salaries and increase the number of applicants interested in that particular job field.

    Increased salaries also help retain qualified, competent employees and decrease the turnover rate.

    Students should review the salary of careers they are interested in to ensure the career will be able to finance their desired lifestyle choices.

    Students can review salaries for a variety of careers at:

    Annual openings
    Each month, the U.S. Department of Labor releases a press statement with the latest findings on employment statistics in the United States.

    According to the August 2014 press release, the average number of youth workers aged 16 to 24 years rose from 2.1 million to 20.1 million workers. Summer typically shows a high increase in the number of youth workers; however, this summer showed a 50.7 percent increase over the previous summer.

    You can review the number of projected yearly job openings with your students, including the number of current workers in each field for a variety of careers at:

    The site even gives a breakdown of male and female workers in each job or career.

    B. Employment Trends

    This section provides an opportunity for students to explore careers and learn about the advances being made in each area.

    Educational level, knowledge, skills, abilities, working conditions and tasks will dictate the directions of this portion of the course. Students should research these trends with the mindset of where they want to go with their life goals and plans. Researching the employment trends of a particular job or career is vital information for students as they are preparing for life beyond high school.

    Education level
    The amount, or lack of, educational background makes a dramatic impact on a person’s employment status.

    Each job or career may require additional education such as:

    • high school/GED
    • on-the-job-training
    • technical school
    • associate’s degree
    • bachelor’s degree
    • master’s degree
    • doctoral degree

    Students can research the educational requirements for specific careers at:

    Knowledge, skills and abilities
    Along with educational background, employers are looking for a key-set of knowledge, skills and abilities that tell the employer the potential employee would be a great candidate for the position.

    The knowledge, skills and abilities can be acquired through taking Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses during middle and high school. CTE courses set a foundation or basis for additional knowledge and skills to be gained at on-the-job training or during post secondary education.

    Students can research the knowledge, skills and abilities required for specific careers at:

    Working conditions
    The work environment of a specific job or career can affect an individual’s physical, emotional, intellectual and social well-being. For this reason, students should review the working conditions required of each job or career they consider.

    This will give students an understanding if the job requires them to work:

    • alone
    • with other people
    • in a quiet environment
    • in a noisy environment

    It will also give them insight if the job requires:

    • traveling
    • long hours
    • extended time on their feet

    Students can research the work environment for specific careers at:

    Tasks
    Knowing the day-to-day tasks of any job or career can give the greatest insight into what it is like to truly work at a particular career.

    More than just reading about it online, students should experience the tasks first hand.
    Students can do this by job shadowing an individual in the field they are interested in. This will give them the greatest indicator of what the position entails.

    Job shadowing is a partnership or agreement with the teacher, student and business/employee for the student to follow the employee around for a specified amount of time, while experiencing the job first hand.

    Students can also take part in a work program or practicum course during high school to gain more knowledge of the desired field while gaining portfolio experience and sometimes, a wage.

    C. Outlook

    As society changes and technological advances make completing job tasks easier and more efficient, the demand for some jobs and careers are decreasing, while others are becoming obsolete. The only way to know for sure that a particular job or career is not on the downward slope, is to do research.

    Job seekers can research the career’s outlook at:

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students investigate careers, including labor market trends, employment trends and job outlook, on the website, www.bls.gov or http://www.onetonline.org/.
    • Have students job shadow individuals in careers they are interested in.
    • Using the research above, have students write a research paper about their findings.
    • Research careers using the handout Career Investigations.
    • Organize a mini career day with guests from each of the respective career clusters.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Education and Training Videos

    Hospitality and Tourism Videos

    Textbook

    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.
    • Jackson, L., (2003). Careers in focus. Tinley Park, IL: Goodheart-Wilcox Company.
    • Lowe, R. (2006.) Consumer education & economics, Student Edition. 6th Edition. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Wehlage, N. (2001.) Goals for living: Managing your resources. Goodheart-Wilcox Publisher.

    Websites

    • CareerOneStop
      CareerOneStop compares state information to national perspectives. It also has tools to help job seekers, students, businesses and career professionals.
      http://www.careerinfonet.org/
    • O*NET Online
      The O*NET Online has detailed descriptions of the world of work for use by job seekers, workforce development and HR professionals, students, researchers and more.
      http://www.onetonline.org/
    • U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
      The Occupational Outlook Handbook provides information and statistics on a wide range of occupations and individual jobs. This information is revised every two years and provides a detailed description of each occupation covered.
      http://www.bls.gov/

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. The most accurate source of occupational information put out by the U.S. government is the:

    • a. Occupational Outlook Handbook
    • b. The 2012 Census
    • c. The U.S. Employment Resource
    • d. The Federal Reserve Manual

    2. Within the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), hospitality and tourism occupations would be found in the ________________ category.

    • a. Healthcare
    • b. Military
    • c. Food Preparation and Serving
    • d. Education

    3. Which of the following pieces of information can be found on the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) website?

    • a. Salaries
    • b. Outlook
    • c. Working conditions
    • d. All of the above

    4. Employment trends are based on:

    • a. supply and demand
    • b. salary demand
    • c. job outlook
    • d. educational level, knowledge, skills, abilities, working conditions and tasks

  • VIII. Consumer Credit

    shutterstock_130347173

    TEKS Addressed

    (5) The student understands personal financial management and recognizes the value of personal fiscal responsibility. The student is expected to:

    • (E) compare and contrast forms of credit, including credit cards and debit cards
    • (F) list the qualifications and procedures to obtain and improve credit scores
    • (G) discuss the impact of identity theft on credit
    • (H) examine the effects of poor credit scores as they relate to personal finance and career opportunities

    Module Content

    Consumer credit is the eighth module in this online course.

    This section contains four units of study that include:

    • A. Forms of Credit
    • B. Ways to Obtain Credit
    • C. Credit Scores
    • D. Identity Theft


    Refer to lessons:

    A. Forms of Credit and B. Ways to Obtain Credit

    Often, consumers don’t have the money in their checking, savings or investment accounts to purchase goods or services they might need.

    In this situation, the consumer can use credit.

    Credit is receiving money, goods or services now, with the promise to repay in the future.

    Examples of credit include:

    • automobile loans
    • credit cards
    • mortgage loans (loans to buy housing)
    • other personal loans

    The borrower agrees to pay the creditor the amount of the loan or credit (the principal) at some future time, plus interest. The amount is referred to as debt, until the borrower repays the creditor.

    The person, business, or financial institution that gives or extends the credit is the creditor. The person receiving the credit is the borrower.

    Advantages of Using Credit

    • Allows consumers to take advantage of sales or special promotions
    • Enables purchase of items not otherwise affordable
    • Facilitates ordering by mail or Internet
    • Helpful when making travel reservations
    • Helps with emergencies
    • May be used to finance education
    • Offers convenience
    • Permits immediate consumption

    Types of Credit

    Types of loans or credit consumers can use:

    • bank loans
    • credit cards
    • finance contracts
    • mortgages

    The types can be summarized:

    • Cash and Sales Credit
      • Cash credit – the borrower receives cash from the creditor (a loan)
      • Sales credit – the borrower buys something now, pays for it later

    • Secured and Unsecured Credit:
      • Secured credit – the borrower pledges property (collateral) to the lender. If the borrower is unable to pay back the actual money of the loan, the creditor gets the collateral. Examples include:
        • car loans, where the car is the collateral
        • mortgage loans, where the collateral is the property
      • Unsecured credit – an unsecured loan is one that is obtained without the use of property as collateral for the loan. Borrowers generally must have high credit ratings to be approved for an unsecured loan.
    • Closed-and Open-Ended Credit:
      • Closed-end credit: A one-time loan for a specific amount and time period. The amount of interest to be paid by the borrower is calculated at the beginning. Closed-end credit can be repaid all at once (single payment) or in set payment amounts, at regular times, over a period of time (installment credit), such as car loans or mortgages.
      • Open-end credit: A line of credit is when the creditor agrees to make available a certain amount of money for the borrower, which can be used and repaid repeatedly. The borrower makes monthly payments and can repay all of the money or make partial payments. Interest is calculated every month. Examples include home equity loans or credit cards.

    Credit cards are probably the most widely used type of credit. They can have a dramatic effect on consumer financial health.

    In the United States today, there are approximately 160,000,000 credit card holders (2012 US Census Statistical Abstract), that’s 51% of the total population! Furthermore, the 30 day delinquency rate in 2011 averaged out at 3.2% (Moody’s April 2012).

    Visit the Mint.org for an explanation of credit cards:

    Cost of Credit:
    When a consumer decides to use credit, he or she is going to pay more than if they had saved the money and purchased the goods or services without using credit. The average American household with at least one credit card has nearly $15,950.00 in credit-card debt (in 2012), according to CreditCards.com, and the average interest rate runs in the mid- to high teens at any given time.

    This amount can be a lot more! See how this works with the Mint.org’s Credit Calculator tools:

    Paying the Bill

    Financial institutions that issue credit cards will send monthly statements. As a consumer, you have certain responsibilities to your creditors.

    Responsibilities of credit users:

    • accept the penalty outlined in the contract for failure to fulfill the promise
    • compare the cost of interest to other things you could do with the money
    • do not borrow unless it is necessary and will enable you to make money
    • pay on time according to the terms of the contract
    • pay the late charge written in the contract for late payments
    • shop for the lowest annual percentage rate
    • think of your overall financial state and your ability to repay before signing a credit agreement

    Get some practice reading and understanding all types of bills and statements from:

    Obtaining and Safeguarding Credit

    The 4 C’s determine how much credit and what form of credit a consumer can receive.

    The 4 C’s of obtaining and keeping credit:

    Capacity: Refers to earning power or regular income available to repay debts. The debt-to-income-ratio, which is the total monthly debt payment divided by net take-home pay, is an indicator of an individual’s capacity to repay new debts.
    Questions on the credit application related to occupation, income, length of employment, and other debts which may reduce monthly income help the creditor evaluate the applicant’s capacity to repay the debt. Does the consumer have the income to repay the debt?

    Capital: Refers to financial worth, including savings and property. The creditor is looking for evidence that the applicant possesses things of value and is thus more likely to be able to repay the debt. Information on the credit application related to savings accounts, other investments, or home ownership are indicators of capital. Does the consumer have items of value which could be used to repay the debt?

    Character: Refers to a person’s reputation for honesty and reliability as demonstrated through stable credit history. A credit application will ask for credit references to learn where credit has previously been granted. Length of time at a job or a residence are indicators of stability. Through a credit investigation, the creditor can learn information such as how much credit has previously been extended and whether the applicant pays bill on time. What is the consumer’s reputation concerning repaying debt on time?

    Collateral: Refers to items of value that lenders may require in return for a loan in the event the loan is not repaid.

    Understanding credit and how to use it is an important financial planning tool.

    C. Credit Scores

    A credit score is the number given to a person that lenders use to determine their ability to repay a loan. The higher the credit score, the better the applicant looks to the credit lender. The lower the score – the higher the risk to the lender and a higher interest rate to you, the borrower.

    A high credit score is needed when searching for an apartment or house because it helps ensure you will be able to make your payments to the credit lender. A good credit score can also mean better job opportunities because it lets employers gauge your responsibility and character. Lower interest and insurance rates are also given to individuals with higher credit scores.

    There are many factors that can lower a person’s credit score that many individuals are unaware of, such as:

    • If a person fails to pays the bills on time, or has delinquent accounts.
    • Every time a person’s credit is checked for a new loan or credit card, even department cards.
    • If an individual has multiple credit cards or has a high debt to income ratio.
    • Filing bankruptcy.

    When a score is lower, it takes a long time of adding positive points to the credit score to change the credit rating.

    Credit Problems

    Too Much Debt

    Consumers can take on too much debt. The inability to repay debt can seriously impact the consumer and the family. A person should weigh the advantages of planned spending:

    • Advantages
      • Family harmony
      • Financial independence
      • Living within income
      • Peace of mind
      • Planned spending patterns
      • Reach long-range goals
      • Satisfies desires and gives lasting enjoyment
      • Saving for emergencies
    • Disadvantages
      • Costly
      • Embarrassment over debt
      • Fuels the temptation to overspend
      • If improperly used, can lead to serious problems, including repossession of property or bankruptcy
      • Impulse buying
      • Increases risk of identity theft
      • Insecurity/unhappiness
      • Tension and/or family friction
      • Worry over money
      • Lack of reserves for emergencies
      • Many unsatisfied wants
      • Reduces financial flexibility in personal money management
      • Ties up future income

    When a consumer is unable to pay back debt, they might have to declare bankruptcy.

    Bankruptcy is a legal term which requires selling off assets (valuables) to pay off the debt. The Department of Justice’s United States Trustee Program approves organizations to provide the credit counseling and debtor education required for anyone filing for personal bankruptcy.

    Visit the site to view on filing for bankruptcy:

    Credit lenders look at the amount of debt owed, your payment history, the types of credit you have, how many new accounts you have opened and the length of credit history to determine your potential to repay a credit loan.

    To Request A Free Credit Score

    Contact one of the three free credit reporting agencies:

    Beware of credit reporting agencies that ask for a credit card to give credit scores. These are the only free credit agencies. Credit scores should be checked at least once per year so you are aware of your financial records.

    A credit score can always be changed. It may take a few months before a noticeable
    change is seen on a credit score. This is because it depends on when the company or business has reported its payments to the credit reporting agencies. For this reason, it is important to always pay your bills on time and to only use credit responsibly.

    Never max out a credit card, and always monitor credit cards, just the way you do your bank account.

    D. Identity Theft

    Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes that affects people all over the world. It is using a person’s private information without their knowledge for personal gain.

    How Identity Theft Occurs
    The individual gains access to your information by robbing the account holder, searching through trash for documents, phishing (defrauding an online account holder of financial information by posing as a legitimate company) or skimming (steal credit/debit card numbers by using a special storage device when processing your card.)

    Reporting Identity Theft

    There are two ways to report identity theft:

    • Contact credit bureaus (places a fraud alert and security freeze on the account to prevent access to your personal information and ability to open new accounts)
    • File a police report where the crime occurred to create an “identity theft report”

    After you report the identity theft, you also should contact the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).
    The FTC will share information of your case nationwide.

    Then, contact the bank and credit card companies to report theft and request new cards and account numbers to be issued.

    The time to fix identity theft varies by each case. Early detection could help minimize the effects. This is why it is important to monitor your credit score at least once yearly through the free credit reporting agencies.

    Safeguards Against Identity Theft

    Protection from identity theft begins by practicing safe internet use –

    • Do not send personal information via e-mail and make online purchases through unsecure websites.
    • Destroy financial records by tearing or shredding any document containing personal information.
    • Guard social security information by keeping it in a secure place at home or in a safe deposit box.

    Check credit reports once a year through free credit reporting agencies, such as Equifax, Experian or Trans Union. Monitoring your credit report will allow you to see any suspicious activity.

    Some credit card companies offer plans to help protect you from identity theft such as Identity Theft Protection plans.

    Teaching Strategies/Lesson Ideas

    • Have students read For Young Adults and Teens Quick Tips for Managing Your Money for simple strategies and practical guidance for borrowing, saving, banking and avoiding scams.
    • Refer to Practical Money Skills for grades 9-12 for additional lesson plans, resources and activities. Educators can use the 22 free, standards-aligned lessons in sequence or on an individual basis.
      https://www.practicalmoneyskills.com/foreducators/lesson_plans/highschool.php
    • Students can get a free credit score estimate by answering the questions at whatsmyscore.org.
    • Ask students to interview one or more family members about where they keep their money and why. If they keep their money in a bank, what factors did they consider in choosing that institution?
    • Distribute handout, Credit Scavenger Hunt and instruct students to use the magazines to find advertisements for three credit cards.
    • Distribute the handout, Credit Interview. Instruct students to interview two adults about their experiences using and obtaining credit.
    • Distribute handout, What’s the Score and have students complete the handout individually using the credit score estimator from http://www.whatsmyscore.org/estimator/.
    • Distribute handout, Deter. Detect. Defend. Watch the video, Deter. Detect. Defend. Avoid ID THEFT from the Federal Trade Commission.
    • Distribute handout, Identity Theft Interview and ask students to interview an adult about identity theft and prevention. Students will write the responses on the handout.
    • Have students develop a plan for maintaining credit safety in order to prevent identity theft and steps to take when reporting identity theft in the form of a checklist.

    References and Resources

    Technology

    Textbook

    • Bingham, M. and Stryker, S. (2003). Career choices: A guide for teens and young adults. Third Edition. United States.
    • Flippen, M. (2001). Teen leadership: Developing leaders for the future. College Station, Texas. United States.
    • Lowe, R. (2006.) Consumer education & economics, Student Edition. 6th Edition. Glencoe/McGraw-Hill.
    • Wehlage, N. (2001.) Goals for living: Managing your resources. Edition. Goodheart-Wilcox Publisher.

    Websites

    • Credit Bureaus
      There are three major credit bureaus, all who use the FICO model to calculate credit scores. Each bureau compiles their own credit reports, so it is important to check your report from each of them to ensure against inaccuracies and fraud.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/resources/bureaus.php
    • Deter, Detect, Defect.
      This website is a one-stop national resource to learn about the crime of identity theft. It provides detailed information to help you deter, detect, and defend against identity theft.
      http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/
    • Deter, Detect, Defend. Avoid ID Theft.
      Source: Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
      Running Time: (9:58)
      Identity theft. It happens when your personal information is stolen and used without your knowledge. It’s a serious crime that can cost you time and money, ruin your credit, and destroy your good name. We know that identity fraud, in its various forms, has affected 10 million people in any given year, and what that means in dollars, is that it is a loss to businesses of about $50 billion. On top of that, victims of identity theft have spent $5 billion trying to undo this harm.
      http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/video/avoid-identity-theft-video.html
    • Do I need to worry about identity theft?
      Check your credit report regularly to make sure you’re not a victim of identity theft. Imposters may use your personal information to get and use credit, which may damage your score.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/break/idtheft.php
    • Free Annual Credit Report
      By federal law, each of the 3 major credit bureaus is required to provide you with one free copy per year of your credit report (though not your credit score) upon request. It is important to review this information not only to track and improve your financial health, but also to ensure against fraud and identity theft.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/resources/freereport.php
    • How do I choose a credit card?
      Before you apply for a credit card or accept a pre-approved offer, examine the credit card closely. The annual percentage rate, annual fee, and transaction fees are just a few factors to consider closely.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/break/creditcardchoices.php
    • Identity Theft
      Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes, and happens when personal information—such as your name, credit card number, social security number or drivers license number—is stolen and used to assume your identity. Imposters can use this information to open bank accounts, make purchases, or even get an apartment in your name. All of this activity will show up on your credit report and may affect your credit score negatively.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/resources/idtheft.php
    • Take Control of Your Credit Score
      This brochure covers all of the essentials of credit scoring. Learn what a credit score is, how it’s calculated, why it’s important, and tips on how to improve your score and keep it in top form.
      http://www.whatsmyscore.org/downloads/pdf/WMS_brochure.pdf
    • Tools for Victims
      While dealing with problems resulting from identity theft can be time-consuming and frustrating, most victims can resolve their cases by being assertive, organized, and knowledgeable about their legal rights. These tools are designed to assist you in resolving disputes related to identity theft and in asserting your legal rights.
      http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/tools.html

    YouTube™

    Career Portals Pre-Assessment Questions

    1. Examples of credit include:

    • a. credit cards, auto loans, mortgage loans and personal loans
    • b. personal and business loans
    • c. a department store card
    • d. money owed to a friend

    2. Which of the following is not an advantage of using credit?

    • a. Allows consumers to take advantage of sales or special promotions
    • b. Carrying a balance instead of paying a bill in full
    • c. Helps with emergencies
    • d. Offers convenience

    3. A credit score is:

    • a. a number assigned to a person who is waiting for a credit card application to be approved
    • b. the number given to a person that lenders use to determine their ability to repay a loan
    • c. the number given to a person who has a large number of purchases on his or her credit card
    • d. the number assigned to a person who has made a significant number of purchases towards a reward level

    4. Which of the three agencies below is a free credit reporting agency?

    • a. FreeCreditReport.com
    • b. MyScore.com
    • c. Experian.com
    • d. Annualcreditreport.com

    5. Identity theft occurs when an individual:

    • a. gains access to your information by robbing the account holder
    • b. skimms
    • c. phishes
    • d. all of the above

    6. To protect yourself against identity theft:

    • a. do not send personal information via e-mail
    • b. do not make online purchases through secure websites
    • c. destroy financial records by tearing or shredding any document containing personal information
    • d. all of the above

  • Quiz

    Career Portals Online Course

    Progress:

    1. Career Portals is a course that:

    2. The Statewide Instructional Resources Development Center focuses on the needs of Texas teachers in the areas of:

    3. The goals of this course include guiding students as they:

    4. School districts have the flexibility to:

    5. Which of the following statements is correct?

    6. According to TEA, a Career Portals course must:

    7. A lifestyle is:

    8. The decision-making process is critical for students to grasp because:

    9. The purpose of creating a lifestyle budget is to:

    10. All of the following are components of a budget except:

    11. A graduation plan:

    12. ________________ allows junior or senior students to enroll in a college course and simultaneously earn high school and college credit for the course.

    13. Career learning experiences could include:

    14. It is important for students to take several different skill or aptitude assessments because:

    15. Personality characteristics are:

    16. The three Career Clusters covered in Career Portals are:

    17. A career pathway is:

    18. Possible careers within the Education and Training Career Cluster include:

    19. Possible careers within the Hospitality and Tourism Career Cluster include:

    20. Possible careers within the Human Services Career Cluster include:

    21. Service learning project ideas should originate from:

    22. Career and Technical Student Organizations include:

    23. Organization, communication and leadership are all skills needed for:

    24. When creating goals, they should be:

    25. The difference between curricular and extracurricular activities is:

    26. An example of a service learning activity is:

    27. Professional organizations offer:

    28. Which of the following is not a form of business correspondence discussed as part of the interview process?

    29. When completing a job application, applicants should:

    30. Which of the following is an example of a professional reference?

    31. For the purpose of an interview, bright colors and patterns:

    32. Which of the following is an interview don’t?

    33. Following an interview, it is common courtesy to:

    34. Which of the following bank accounts is known as a savings account?

    35. Debit cards:

    36. The best description of a budget is:

    37. Budgeting a particular amount for savings should be treated as:

    38. Banks are considered safe places to keep money because:

    39. A budget is a tool:

    40. Life events that involve money matters include, but are not limited to:

    41. The most accurate source of occupational information put out by the U.S. government is the:

    42. Within the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), hospitality and tourism occupations would be found in the ________________ category.

    43. Which of the following pieces of information can be found on the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) website?

    44. Employment trends are based on:

    45. Examples of credit include:

    46. Which of the following is not an advantage of using credit?

    47. A credit score is:

    48. Which of the three agencies below is a free credit reporting agency?

    49. Identity theft occurs when an individual:

    50. To protect yourself against identity theft:

    Please only click once to submit. Your answers are ready to be sent.

    Please confirm that you are human and answer on this simple math question: 5 + 6 =